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Full text of "CTA transit news"

NORTHWESTERN UNIV'r F 
LIBRARY 




TRANSPORTA1 



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1984 Volume 37-Number 1 

Transit News 



/ 



Raging fire stops service; 
threatens CTA elevated 



(Story on page 2) 



•\ K 



A Lake/Dan Ryan train crosses the 'L ' structure at Jefferson and Lake near the site of a multi-alarm fire, the worst in two years for Chicago. Remnants of 
the six-story building, seen in the background, were leveled by a crane. 



©Chicago Sun-Times 
Photograph by Jim Klepitsch 
Reprinted with permission 






Raging fire stops service 

An early morning fire on Tuesday, January 3, ripped 
through a six-story building at the southwest corner of Lake 
and Jefferson streets, quickly spreading to two adjacent 
buildings and threatening CTA's 90-year-old Lake street ele- 
vated structure, just 25 feet away. 

The blaze broke out at 3:30 a.m. on the morning of the 
first working day of the new year, and before the dramatic 
story of the worst fire in Chicago in two years ended, 
30,000 Lake-Dan Ryan "L" riders, and many CTA officials, 
would be wondering when — or if— the venerable structure 
would be back in service. 

The fire spread rapidly through the multi-use buildings 
and suddenly erupted with volcanic fury into a roaring con- 
flagration that grew so hot paint bubbled on vehicles parked 
more than 100 feet away. 




A Bantam crane and tower truck hoists men and material up to build 
new track at Lake street. Extensive repairs were needed following 
firemen and CTA workers' around-the-clock efforts to subdue a multi- 
alarm fire which temporarily halted "L" service. 

Chicago Fire Department fire chiefs at the scene 
ordered a 5-11 alarm with two specials, one of the depart- 
ment's highest priorities; that brought a total of 185 firefight- 
ers, 28 engine companies, five truck companies, and two 
giant snorkel units to the scene. 

They fought the blaze for more than three hours before 
bringing it under control and listing it as "struck out." Actual- 
ly, the burned buildings were still smoldering on January 23. 

Firefighters pumped more than five million gallons of 
water on the blaze to bring the inferno under control. 

"The near-disaster which threatened the Lake street 'L' 
structure was averted because of the excellent cooperation 
of the Chicago Fire Department plus other city departments 
with the CTA," said Thomas Wolgemuth, manager, Facili- 
ties Engineering and Maintenance department. 

"Together, the city and the CTA prove, in big ways and 
small, Chicago is the city that works— very well," he added. 

For more details on the Lake street fire, and the out- 
standing response from CTA employees that restored serv- 
ice the next day, see pages 12- 13. 



From the Chairman 

Meeting the challenge 

Deep snow on our streets, sleet and icing on our rail 
lines, extended periods of bone-chilling temperatures, and 
seasonally-high ridership levels have always made winter 
the most difficult and trying season for public transportation 
in Chicago— and this year is no exception. 

During the height of the Christmas Season, when we 
experienced 100 consecutive hours of sub-zero tempera- 
tures, and four consecutive days of record-breaking low tem- 
peratures, CTA employees put aside thoughts of warm holiday 
gatherings and met winter's challenge, many working 12 to 
16-hour days to keep the system moving. Bus operators and 
train crews braved hazardous operating conditions to meet 
their schedules, and treated frustrated riders courteously. 
They were supported by other dedicated employees who 
worked out in the weather clearing frozen switches, jump- 
starting, repairing, and towing disabled vehicles, maintaining 
signals, and clearing station platforms and bus terminals of 
hazardous snow and ice. 

As a result of your efforts, CTA was able to maintain an 
extraordinary level of service, with 96 per cent of our sched- 
uled runs operating at the worst point, and 99 per cent of 
our scheduled runs operating at most times during those 
four cold days. My fellow Board members and I congratu- 
late you for a job well done and thank you for the sacrifice 
and dedication you have shown. 

In the midst of the ravages of winter, at 3:30 a.m. 
January 3, CTA employees were called upon to meet yet 
another challenge. A 5-11 alarm fire with two special 
alarms, Chicago's worst fire in two years, destroyed a six- 
story building just south of the Lake Street elevated structure 
and west of the Clinton Street station. Lake Street rapid 
transit service was suspended while the Chicago Fire Depart- 
ment contained the blaze and prevented the flames and in- 
tense heat from causing severe damage to the steel elevated 
structure. As soon as the Fire Department determined that it 
was safe for CTA to inspect and repair damage caused when 
part of a wall fell onto the structure, Facilities Engineering 
and Maintenance personnel answered the call and worked 
through the night replacing bent rail, broken ties, and dam- 
aged electrical cables. 

We commend Facilities Maintenance for a job well 
done. Through their efforts, which were hampered by the 
cold weather and smoke from the smoldering fire, Lake 
Street service was restored for the morning rush hour on 
January 4. We also commend employees from Transporta- 
tion and other departments who operated one of the most 
smoothly-run emergency shuttle services ever deployed in 
Chicago, filling the gap in Lake Street service during the fire. 

It is also gratifying to see that, even when faced with the 
challenges of a severe winter, we can show our concern for 
those less fortunate than ourselves. I therefore join the 
United Cerebral Palsy Foundation in thanking and congrat- 
ulating CTA employees. Your generous donations and other 
activities helped make the 1984 United Cerebral Palsy Tele- 
thon a success that will provide aid for victims of this crip- 
pling disease and research that will some day find a cure. 



JLXL; 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




John McClain. bus instructor at Limits Garage, is commended by C TA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 
after McClain rescued a young Indianapolis couple who were stranded on Chicago's south side 
due to foul weather. 



Bus Instructor 
McClain rescues 
stranded couple 

This story is so good it should be 
made into a television movie. So, let's 
go ahead and do it. 

Opening Scene: A 1973 red Ford 
sedan slowly makes its way through a 
December snowstorm just before Christ- 
mas. The old car is on the northbound 
lanes of the Dan Ryan expressway. 

Inside are a young couple, James 
Stoneking, 21, and his 18-year-old 
wife, Kristine. Stoneking has trouble 
steering the car on the snow-packed 
roadway. The car's tires are bald and 
the gas tank is nearly empty. 

The young husband is nearly ex- 
hausted. He's been driving through 
the snow from Indianapolis since 10:15 
p.m. It is nearly 6:30 a.m. 

The visibility on the Ryan gets worse 
as the storm intensifies. Stoneking is 
so tired he aches and he is concerned 
for his young wife. 

His car suddenly skids, he avoids 
hitting one car, nearly collides with a 
second and his sleepy wife is thrown 
against her door. 

She is seven months pregnant, very 
weary, and anxious to be with her 
mother in Batavia, Illinois, another 50 
miles away. 

Stoneking can't go any further; he 
pulls off the expressway into an all- 
night gas station. 

Scene 2: Kristine telephones her 



mother, Mrs. Barbara Lawrence. She 
tells her mother she and James are ex- 
hausted, are somewhere on the South 
Side, 79th and State, read the street 
signs, they are low on gas, the car's 
tires are bald, and she is frightened. 

Scene 3: While talking to her daugh- 
ter on the telephone, Mrs. Lawrence 
tells her help will be on the way, to stay 
with the car at the gas station. After 
getting the gas station's telephone 
number from Kristine, Mrs. Lawrence 
hangs up her phone and as part of her 
morning routine, tunes in the Wally 
Phillips radio show on WGN, and pon- 
ders her daughter's problem. 

Wally Phillips is always helping peo- 
ple with problems, she recalls. She 
finds the station's number in the tele- 
phone directory, dials it, and asks for 
Wally Phillips. 

Scene 4: Marilyn Miller, Wally 
Phillips' producer, answers Mrs. 
Lawrence's phone call and hears the 
anxious mother pour out her story. 
Quickly, Ms. Miller sends Phillips an 
urgent note. 

Scene 5: Wally Phillips, ear phones 
in place, microphone close to his face, 
signals for Mrs. Lawrence's telephone 
call to go "live" with him. She repeats 
her story to Phillips and to the millions 
of listeners on his radio show. "Sure- 
ly," Phillips tells his listeners, "someone 
in Chicago could come to the rescue 
of this young couple, lost in the winter 
storm." 

Scene 6: A 1982 GMC pickup truck 
is heading north out of Roseland with 
CTA bus driver instructor John McClain 



at the wheel. He too is tuned to the 
Wally Phillips show and he hears the 
pleas for help. At 79th, McClain turns 
off and drives to the gas station. 

Scene 7: The pickup stops at the 
red '73 Ford. McClain gets out of his 
truck, motions Stoneking to open his 
car window and asks "Can I help 
you?" The young couple are stunned. 
How did this stranger know they need- 
ed help? The 50-year-old bus driver 
instructor explains the broadcast on 
Wally Phillips' radio show. 

"First, we have to get your car to a 
safe place. Then we'll see about get- 
ting you two to Batavia," he says. 

Scene 8: After parking their car by 
McClain's pickup, he tells Stoneking, 
"I've got some time before 1 report to 
work. Will you let me drive you to 
Batavia? My pickup is equipped for 
bad weather driving." 

Scene 9: Just before leaving, 
Kristine telephones her mother with 
the wonderful offer they have just re- 
ceived "from a CTA employee" and 
happily said they will be home as soon 
as possible. 

Scene 10: Mrs. Lawrence tele- 
phones Wally Phillips and gives him 
and his listeners the good news of the 
rescue of the young couple. Phillips 
praises the unknown CTA employee 
turned good Samaritan and asks the 
anxious mother to call him again when 
they arrive at her Batavia home. 

Scene 11: Mrs. Lawrence excitedly 
tells Phillips a pickup truck has just 
pulled up to her home and her daugh- 
ter, son-in-law, and a uniformed man 
are getting out. The couple praise the 
man in uniform to Phillips and Phillips 
joins in the praising of McClain, who 
characteristically says, "Thanks, but 
someone had to help them. I just hap- 
pened to be the first one along. There 
probably were plenty of others." 

Epilogue: Paul Kadowaki, area su- 
perintendent, Instruction, later escorted 
McClain to the Chairman's Office where 
CTA chairman Michael A. Cardilli ex- 
pressed his sentiments: "It was won- 
derful, just wonderful what you did for 
those young people." 

What motivates McClain to go to 
the aid of distressed people? 

"My mother is a strongly religious 
Methodist who reads her Bible daily 
and is a great and good influence on 
me. She has taught me to respect 
others, to help those in need, and to 
share my joy in living the good life in 
the service of God" 



Commendation Corner 



Marshall Price (77th Street 

garage) was appreciated (or 

his alertness on a No. 30 

South Chicago bus by Rose 

Pilipowski, of Avenue J. "In 

South Chicago, about five 

senior citizens got on the bus 

and also a young man. The 

driver watched in the rearview 

mirror as the young man was 

about to pick the purse of 

one of the ladies. He stopped 

the bus, opened the door, 

turned in his seat and told the 

young man to leave, all done 

very calmly. The young man 

got off. Due to the alert 

driver, the lady didn 't lose 

anything. This driver is very 

courteous, as I have ridden 

on his bus many times. He 

handles his job with dignity." 



John Koldan (North Section) was thanked for his honesty 
as a ticket agent at the Jarvis station by Scott Foster, of 
Jarvis Avenue. "I paid what I thought was 90 cents to the 
agent and proceeded upstairs to the platform . Upon reaching 
the platform, a voice came over the loudspeaker asking for 
'the gentleman in the suit' to come back downstairs. I 
responded, albeit slightly annoyed, since I was sure I had 
paid the full amount. Well, I was wrong. One of the 'quar- 
ters' 1 had paid was actually a Susan B. Anthony dollar, 
which the agent called to my attention, whereupon 1 ex- 
changed a quarter for the dollar. Such honesty is certainly 
commendable and worthy of attention." 

George Gray (Archer garage) was the operator of a No. 
99 Stevenson Express bus ridden by Therese Bronsberg, of 
Palos Heights. "Riding with him is a real pleasure. He always 
greets you with a 'Good morning' and a big smile. I even 
heard him tell a lady who was standing that a seat was va- 
cant at the rear of the bus. You do not mind going to work, 
on Mondays especially, when he is in the driver's seat. I am 
sure I am not the only one who feels that way about him. If 
they would all take the trouble to write, believe me you 
would have a very thick file on this wonderful man." 

Lachesler Drain (Limits garage) was complimented for 
his courtesy as operator of a No. 36 Broadway bus by 
Joseph Meagher, who lives in a senior citizen center on 
Broadway. "He is very friendly and helps people all the 
time. One morning I saw him stop the bus and help a blind 
person who was caught in traffic. His conduct as a driver is 
excellent. He is also neat and clean. Everybody has a good 
word for him. He would make a good supervisor. The main 
thing is he gets along with people. That is the main factor in 
dealing with the public." 




Rosemary Hoskins (North 
Park garage) was commended 
for "her efficient and courteous 
manner" as operator of a No. 
146 Marine/Michigan Express 
bus by Louise Slowick, of 
Hawthorne Place. "I boarded 
the bus and sat directly 
behind the driver. She answered 
all questions cheerfully, and 
called out all stops. It is 
difficult for visitors to get 
around without directions. She 
quickly put them at ease with 
her help. I counted 10 per- 
sons who took the time, as 
they got off, to compliment 
her on being so polite and 
courteous. Too many of us 
complain but seldom take 
the time to let someone know 
we do care. I enjoyed that 
bus trip." 



Cesar Lovera (North Park garage) "deserves nothing but 
the utmost of praise" for helping to recover documents that 
Jeanne Fox, of Worth, had left on his leader's bus. "He did 
everything possible to get my package, and tried to reassure 
me everything would be all right after he saw how terribly 
upset I was. He finally caught up with the (No. 156) LaSalle 
bus ahead of us, and I did get my package back. This 
package meant a lot, since it was full of important documents 
associated with my job. This driver had the utmost courtesy 
and handled the situation with ease. He helped me out in a 
time of critical need." 

Henry Johnson (West Section) was the agent at Damen/ 
North where Helen Ptasek, of Augusta Boulevard, went to 
take a train downtown. "In my haste, I gave the agent a $10 
bill. I am a senior citizen and usually pay 50 cents. I walked 
away without counting my change. When I sat in the train, I 
was about to put my money away when I remembered 
about the $10 bill. What to do? I got off at Division and went 
back to Damen. Imagine my surprise when the agent told 
me he tried to call me, but I was already gone. He had my 
$9 in bills for me. I felt so good to think there are some won- 
derful people still around." 

Donald Liberko (North Section) was remembered for his 
helpfulness as an agent by Richard Kosik, of New York City. 
"I happened to be visiting the Near North Side on business. I 
was supposed to meet someone at Elm and State. I got off 
the train at Chicago/State and ascended to the mezzanine. I 
was confused about which way to go, so I consulted the 
ticket agent. He was very helpful, and I reached my destina- 
tion with no trouble at all. While I was getting my directions, 
several people came by with fares and transfers. He wished 
them all a nice day, and they all went their ways with smiles 
on their faces." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Honorees cited for 
response to crises 

A bus operator and two rail service 
personnel who took direct action to 
minimize injury to CTA riders and 
avoid property damage, or service de- 
lays in two separate incidents have re- 
ceived special recognition on "A Day 
in CTA." 

The honorees are Marshall E. Boyd, 
bus operator, 77th Street Garage, and 
motorman John Williams and his con- 
ductor, Jimmie Singleton of Howard 
Street Terminal. 

John McClain, a bus instructor at 
the Limits Training Center, was also 
honored for assisting a stranded mo- 
torist and his wife who were enroute to 
Batavia (see story, page 3). 

Boyd earned kudos for stopping his 
southbound Michigan/Harrison bus 
when he observed his leader's slowly 
moving bus with no one at the steering 
wheel. The problem developed as the 
operator of the errant vehicle and a 
passenger were fighting. 

Boyd caught up with the bus board- 
ed and brought it to a safe stop. Boyd 




Appreciation for a pb well done is shown to (from left) bus instructor John McClain, motorman 
John Williams and conductor Jimmie Singleton, "A Day in CTA" honorees. The three show off 
their certificates during a visit in the control center. 



notified the control center and re- 
quested medical aid for a woman who 
had injured her ankle when she jumped 
from the moving bus and fell to the 
pavement. 

Other honorees, motorman John 
Williams and conductor Jimmie 
Singleton, were the operating crew on 
Run 820 of the North-South route 
outside the 35th Street station when a 



fire developed underneath their train. 
The fire was not discovered until 
Singleton heard a noise and saw smoke 
coming from one of the cars as the 
train was leaving the southside station. 
Unable to get to the emergency cord, 
he pulled the door emergency which 
caused the motorman (Williams) to 
stop the train. The two then worked to 
evacuate the train of its passengers. 



Thanks for a job well done 



Employees who have received commendations. 



Shaid Abdullah, 77th Street 

Carmen Betances, North Park 
James Bibbs, 69th Street 
James Brooks, 77th Street 
Robert Brown, North Park 
Raymond Burkhardt, Archer 

Jean Cage, North Park 
Sergio Candelaria, Limits 
Eugene Cannon, Archer 
Wafer Carter, 69th Street 
Ray Carter, Limits 
Anthony Ceriale, Forest Glen 
Rufus Cleveland, Douglas/ 

Congress 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
Michael Cobleigh, North Park 
Farris Collins, Lawndale 
Mary Conley, Limits 
Jerry Conner, North Park 
Claude Conwell, 69th Street 
Andrew Correa, North Park 
Luke Costanza, Forest Glen 
Robert Cowan, North Avenue 
Albert Croarkin, 77th Street 

Victor Davila, North Park 
Electra DeAlba, North Avenue 
Joseph Dean, 69th Street 
William Demery, Jr., 77th Street 
Robert Densmore, Rail District- 
North 



Robert Devitt, North Park 
Charles Dial, North Park 
Allen Dixon, North Avenue 

Leslie Edwards, North Avenue 

Frederick Fadowole, North Park 
Emiliano Feliciano, Limits 
Roberta Flores, North Avenue 
Judge Ford, Limits 

Tyrone Garrett, North Park 
David Gaston, North Park 
George Gray, Archer 
Edgar Griffin Jr., North Avenue 
Joe Griffith, Beverly 

Moses Hampton, 69th Street 
John Hanna, North Avenue 
Leon Hayden, 77th Street 
Mildred Heath, 77th Street 
Joseph Hendrickson, North Park 
Sabino Hernandez, North Park 
Peyton Hightower, 77th Street 
Gregory Hoard, Forest Glen 
Diane Howard, Ashland 

Sanders Ingram, Lawndale 

Willie James, North Park 
Jerry Jenkins, North Park 
Walter Jentsch, North Park 
Lewis Johnson, 77th Street 
Calvin Johnson, North Avenue 



David Jones, North Avenue 
Howard Jones, Archer 
Robert Jones, North Park 

William Knudsen, Forest Glen 
Bernard Koniarski, North Park 
Robert Kremer, North Park 

Charley Lane, Beverly 
Nathan Lanier, North Avenue 
John Lemond, North Park 
Giles Liddell Jr., Limits 
Augustin Lopez, Jefferson Park 

Ephriam Mauldin, 69th Street 
Jesse Mayfield, North Avenue 
Diego Medina, North Avenue 
Carmelo Morales, Forest Glen 
Robert Moskovitz, North Park 
Edward Mrozek, 77th Street 

Martin Navarro, North Avenue 
Wanda Navarro, Howard/ 
Kimball 

Elbert Pearson, 69th Street 
Hillman Phillips, 77th Street 

Manuel Ramirez, North Park 
Thomas Rhone, 77th Street 
Annie Rice, Limits 
Artis Rigsby, Forest Glen 
Jack Robinson, Limits 



John Ross, Archer 
Lonnie Rupert, Limits 

Joseph Slaughter, North Park 
Frank Staszak, Limits 
Willie Stewart, Beverly 
Willie Stewart, North Avenue 
Hugh Stone, Archer 
Theodore Stutts, Archer 
Elmer Swan, North Park 
Henry Sykes, Beverly 

Pleas Talley Jr., 69th Street 
Adrian Taylor, Douglas/Congress 
Rhone Terrell, Lawndale 
Doris Thompson, 77th Street 
Johnny Trice, Forest Glen 

Arturo Valdez, North Park 
Maria Vinas, Forest Glen 

Elizabeth Washington, 77th Street 

Walter White, Beverly 

Rickey White, Douglas/Congress 

James Williams, Limits 

Willie Williams Jr., North Park 

Jacques Yezeguielian, North 

Avenue 
Amy Young, 69th Street 
Thelma Young, Forest Glen 

Anthony Zenner, North Park 
Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



1984 



Vol. 37-No. 1 




A»W»A»R»D»S 





A special service bus at Washington garage is safety checked thoroughly from engine and platform operation by bus repairer William McCray, to 
clean windows by bus servicer Ray Jasutsis. 



Maintenance personnel at Rosemont 
terminal were first place winners in the 
third quarter Zero Accident Program 
competition. It was the first ZAP com- 
petition for the terminal which will pro- 
vide service to O'Hare International 
Airport. 

Rosemont, which opened early last 
year, "is a melting pot of personnel," 
said Richard Lorimer, superintendent 
for equipment and maintenance. "We 
have a mixture of people from all over 
the system who picked Rosemont ter- 
minal, and we have some of the best 
working conditions," he added. 

Lorimer said Rosemont, the largest 
rapid transit terminal in the CTA sys- 
tem, has the most modern equipment 
and lighting. "Work conditions and 
employee attitude contribute to a low- 
er accident rate at Rosemont," said 



Rosemont, 
Washington 
take first place 
in ZAP 



Lorimer. He noted that cleaner facili- 
ties tend to make the employee a bit 
more careful. 

Another first timer in the ZAP compe- 
tition taking place honors was Wash- 
ington garage, the Special Services 
facility. 

William Wong, maintenance super- 
visor at Washington garage, said the 
facility will continue to participate in 
ZAP, and hopes to continue in first 
place. 

Wong attributed the garage's first 
place ZAP showing to the close super- 
vision of part time employees where 
he said the most attention was needed. 
Close supervision by the Equipment 
Engineering/Maintenance and Indus- 
trial Safety Group, and monthly fire 
drills also played a part in Washington 
garage's success in ZAP, Wong said. 

Meanwhile, rail maintenance per- 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



MM 


9S J 

Eft ■ J 'f ^H 




The undercarriage of this truck at the new Rosemont terminal gets a 
good inspection from this safety conscious crew which includes (from 
left) repairers Bill Nielsen, Joe Kolek, and Ed Regester. 



Fields discusses a heating circuit problem on this 2400 series car with 
maintenance repairmen (from left) Mike Cochran, Al Curtis, and John Luiz. 




Showing off first place ZAP plaques earned at Skokie shops are (from left) Jan Broda, Shop Service foreman; Frank Vukovics, unit supervisor; Frank 
Porcaro, Sub-Mechanical foreman; Bob Bueger, Carpenter Shop foreman; Ted Szymanski, Armature Room foreman; George Haenisch, superintend- 
ent; Vito Pontrelli, acting foreman, Armature Room; Mark Dundovich, unit supervisor; Pat Harnett, Sub-Electrical foreman; Ken Blocker, Blacksmith/ 
Welding foreman, and George Wylie, unit supervisor. 

sonnel at the 98th Street terminal took 
their second consecutive first place ZAP 
honor. Foreman Leon Fields, formerly 
of 61st Street terminal, said as person- 
nel at 98th Street continue to exercise 
safety discipline, the accident rate con- 
tinues to decline. 

"Our record has improved greatly 
because our personnel are really tak- 
ing safety seriously," said Fields. 

First place winners in the Bus Shops 
competition were: Vehicle Wiring, Up- 
holstery Shop, Mechanical, Electrical 
Units Rebuild, Engine Rebuild, Ma- 
chine Shop, Radiator Shop, and the 
Print Shop. 

At Skokie Rail Shops first place hon- 
ors went to: Carpenter Shop, Armature 
Room, Shop Service, Blacksmith/ 
Welding, Degreasing, Sub-Mechani- 
cal, and Sub-Electrical. 




Leon Fields, 98th Street terminal foreman (center, shop coat), is proud of the first place achieve- 
ment earned by maintenance personnel. Holding the coveted plaque is Mike Cochran, car repairer. 



1984 



Vol. 37-No. 1 



Maintenance employees earn a Day in CTA 




Josefina Ramos, Terry Short, and Roy Mitchell, Maintenance department personnel honored with 
"A Day in CTA, " get a close look at operations in the control center. Their hosts are bus con- 
trollers Michael Sanchez (back to camera), and Frank Jones. 



Three employees from Equipment 
Engineering & Maintenance were rec- 
ognized January 10 for their alertness 
and actions beyond the call of duty 
with a "Day in CTA." 

Terry Short, night foreman at North 
Avenue, was making a routine inspec- 
tion of the garage last winter when he 
discovered flames shooting out of a 
large electrical box. After summoning 
help over a bus monitor, he turned off 
electrical power and attempted to ex- 
tinguish the blaze until firemen arrived. 
Due to his efforts, damage was kept to 
a minimum and all personnel remained 
out of danger. 

Roy Mitchell, acting foreman, Rail 
South, was in the Racine shop when 
he noticed a flash in the yard last July 
21. Upon investigation, he found a fire 
under a rapid transit car, and notified 
the Control Center. After calling for 
the removal of power in the yard, he 
tried to put the fire out with a hand ex- 
tinguisher. Mitchell and other repair 
personnel continued working to con- 
tain the fire until firemen arrived. 

Josephine Ramos, bus servicer at 
North Avenue, risked her personal 
safety on two occasions last fall to stop 
runaway buses. In both instances she 
jumped onto a moving bus to bring it 
to a stop. By taking prompt action, she 
was able to prevent any injuries to per- 
sonnel or damage to the equipment. 



Perfect attendance 

Equipment Engineering & Mainte- 
nance employees who achieved perfect 
attendance records at their jobs in 1983 
have been presented with achievement 
awards for their efforts. Florence Salus, 
superintendent of Personnel, an- 
nounced the following recipients from 
among bus maintenance personnel: 



Archer: 

Allan Adamczyk 
Carmen Alletto 
Wayne Burton 
Richard Creal 
Salvatore DeStefano 
Steven Econom 
David Evans 
Gabriel Figueroa 
Federico Garza 
Patrick Healy 
Gregory Johnson 
Dennis Kostolansky 
Jose Mercado 
Lorenzo Rodriguez 
Antone Shimkus 
David Thompson Jr. 
8 



William Vandusen 
Calvin Webb 
Beverly: 
Donald Berge 
Burton Bockel 
Dennis Dougherty 
Roger Ferguson 
Claude Fizer 
Thomas Hummel 
Andrew Karkoska 
Fred Klotzbucher 
Paul Klotzbucher 
Thomas Paski 
Jonathan Rivers 
Thomas Smith 
Melvin Tolliver 



Forest Glen: 

Steven Braswell 
Robert Kaese 
Richard Kosinski 
Thaddeus Kwiecien 
Gaspare Lombardo 
Mark Maginnis 
Aldo Marsico 
Salvatore Marsico 
Edward Murray 
Robert Romano 
Michael Schwarz 
Larry Styburski 
Richard Ulasy 
Phillip Wong 
Lawndale: 
John Brown 
Verdie Coleman 
Leslie Gooley 
Michael Jurek 
William Michaluk 
Salvatore Salatino 
Limits: 

Maurice Austin 
Julio Diaz 

Roger Louis-Charles 
George Maloy 
Raul Robaina 



North Avenue: 

Jerry Dominick 
Vincent Genna 
Jose Guerrero 
Joseph Lombardo 
Gumersindo Nazario 
Michael Nykolyshyn 
Elmer Seymore 
Nicola Tropea 
North Park: 
Leonard Bialek 
Jose Caravantes 
Patrick Daly 
Alcides Gonzales 
Gary Kendzerski 
Sang Joo Kim 
Robert Lorentz 
Keith Szlak 
Mariano Urdaz 
Ronald Vick 
John Ward 
William Wehrmeister 
69th Street: 
James Allen 
Charles Baker 
Eugene Banks 
Robert Bosco 
Harvey Brock 



Vandie Brown 
Byron Clinton 
James Evans 
Michael Jagielski 
Horace Lewis 
Clarence Reese Jr. 
Willie Whaley 
77th Street: 
Marcellus Barnes 
Louis Coleman 
William Donovan 
Andrew Durity 
Clarence Forbes 
Bernard Grant 
Raymond Hendricks Jr. 
Willie Hudson 
Harold Johnson 
Wadswort Jones 
Roger Koehler 
Alan Lewis 
David Pavey 
Lasalle Randle 
Robert Valerious 
Louis Warmack 
Samuel Washington 
John Wiggins 
Kleo Zaharopoulos 

CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Crisis intervention 




Separate groups of CTA women employees participated in recent seminars on rape crisis intervention conducted by the 
Women's Services Department, Loop YVVCA. Attending were (Top, front row), Sandra Shintani, Francesca Pancewicz, 
Dorothy Johnson, Elda Leal, Carol Mamon, Joan Berry, Betty Richman, Virginia McGraw, Dickelle Fonda, Program Coor- 
dinator, Women's Services, and Barbara Engel, Director of Women's Services, Loop YWCA. James Blaa (left), special assis- 
tant to Executive Director Bernard Ford, and Ford (right) were also present. Others in the photo are (back row), Ruth Alicia 
Moore, Ethel Armstrong, Mary Beth Cobleigh, CTA Assault and Rape Victim Advocacy Program Coordinator; Theresa 
Sawyer, Margo Julun, Helma Duniver, Judy Hedin, Veronica Parker, and Charlie Mae Lee. The second group (bottom 
photo) included (front row), Mary Beth Cobleigh, Claudette Westbrook, Dickelle Fonda, Geri Tapling, Camilla Render, 
Diane Rockymore, Diane Blaino. Carolyn Brown, Ella Otis, and Arlene Jenny. Others shown (back row) are James Blaa, 
Barbara Engel, Norma Porter, Jan Olson, Clare Cox, Frances Calpin, and Hattie Peterson. 




Food baskets 

CTA employees at the Merchandise 
Mart filled these boxes with canned 
goods and other food items to be dis- 
tributed to the needy during the Christ- 
mas season. The contributions were 
delivered to Chicago's Department of 
Human Services. Shown preparing the 
boxes for delivery are (from left) Carol 
Jackson, computer section data entry 
clerk; Wendy Evans, Schedules sec- 
tion control clerk; Virginia Wolfe, sec- 
retary. Schedules section, and James 
Marble, senior schedules clerk. Marble 
was project coordinator. Another par- 
ticipant in the Christmas project for the 
needy was Alton Norris, schedule maker. 



7984 



Vol. 37-No. 1 



halti 




A snorkel is the only answer as firemen 1 
remains of the 129-year-old building whin 
later felled by a wrecking ball. 

This smoldering, twisted wreckage is all't 
Lake Street as firemen continue to pump* 

Bricks and other rubble from the north A 
Lake Street 'L ' tracks at Jefferson with 9 
were strewn onto the structure (above) it 
to clean up the area. 



Afire in the Lake Jefferson Industrial Building, 601-627 W. 
Lake St., at 3:30 a.m. on January 3 quickly mushroomed 
into one of Chicago's worst fires in two years when a three-inch 
natural gas pipe ruptured, escalating the fire's intensity. 

The natural gas, backed by a force of 17 pounds per square 
inch of pressure, spewed its energy-rich fuel into the flames, 
converting the fire into an inferno. 

To reach this pipe's shut-off valve, Peoples Gas Company 
crews had to dig a hole three feet deep into Lake street, a diffi- 
cult task in the face of the heat generated by the blaze. They 
finally reached the valve at 11:15 a.m. and turned off the gas. 

Above the diggers stood the Lake street 'L' structure. It 
appeared to be the growing fire's target until the CTA asked the 
Fire Department for help. 

At the request of CTA officials at the fire scene, firefighters 
were assigned to train hoses on the Lake street 'L' structure 
to protect its steel, iron, and wooden components from the 
intense heat. 

A 14 m.p.h. south wind fanned the flaming fingers at the old 
metal and wood elevated structure raising fears that damage 
might be caused by warping or cracking of its columns and hor- 
izontal support beams. The old structure had been riveted 
together in 1893. 

It was newer than the six-story building at Lake and Jeffer- 
son which was constructed in 1855 and managed to survive the 



Great Chicago Fire of 1871. 

C. Len Wiksten, director of Facilities Maintenance, and his 
staff were at the fire scene shortly after they were alerted that 
the blaze was endangering the 'L' structure. 

During the height of the furious fire, they looked on in horror 
as the north wall of the six-story building suddenly collapsed, 
sending tons of bricks and steel onto the old 'L' structure and 
into Lake street. 

By dawn, the smoke streaked sky over Lake and Jefferson 
illuminated a scene of apparent disasterous results to the old 
Lake street 'L.' 

A large section of the double track structure was burdened 
with rubble piled on the running rails, third rails, footwalks and 
ties. Water used to control the fire now encased everything on 
the structure and in the street with ice because of the below 
freezing weather that gripped the city. 

Worse yet, two towering portions of the burned buildings 
loomed over the 'L' structure, threatening to repeat the first 
calamity. 

Wiksten and his men took a grim survey of the scene. They 
listed about 250 feet of third rail mangled or broken; 1,000 feet 
of telephone cable and another thousand feet of signal cable 
was burned through in various places, leaving some of it in the 
street below. 

They counted 37 stout timber ties broken, 310 feet of wood 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



re threatening damage to 'L' service 




! flames from a better vantage point. The gutted 
rilously overshadowed the 'L ' tracks was 



r emains of the six-story industrial building at 
?r into the rubble. 

' the six-story burning building tumbled onto the 
•pact of an earthquake. Tons of brick and steel 
ito Lake Street until workmen (below) were able 




guard rails were broken, and more than 80 feet of wood foot- 
walks between the tracks had completely or partially collapsed. 

The worst part was structural damage to seven top lateral 
steel angles and six top flange angles, which were bent for 
lengths of one to five feet. 

"As soon as the smoke cleared, CTA laborers hauled many, 
many 100-pound bags of sand up the stairs of the Clinton sta- 
tion," said Pat McCarthy, supervisor of track and structure. 

"Under the guidance of LeVelle Nichols, their foreman, they 
spread the sand over the disaster scene and got as close to 
those towering pieces of walls as possible." he said. 

McCarthy said the laborers then assisted track foreman Bob 
Wantrease and his section gang in removing the ice and debris 
from the structure, and hauled up fresh lumber and equipment 
from the street. 

Rebuilding and rehabilitating of the structure and its compo- 
nents were coordinated by Tommy Staunton, unit supervisor, 
track construction, who ordered the needed materials from 
West Shops' storeroom 48. and Charles Dunkins, unit super- 
visor, track maintenance and his crew working on the dam- 
aged site. 

Meanwhile, carpenter leader Stein Gunderson and a small 
gang of carpenters went to work replacing the damaged foot- 
walks between the tracks under the supervision of Joe 
Fucarino, unit supervisor, general maintenance. 



All of this CTA employee activity was going on in the shad- 
ows of those two ruined structures — one, apparently an eleva- 
tor shaft, the other the remains of a tall chimney. 

About 125 CTA workers were working on the structure while 
smoke continued to rise from the fire's rubble. 

By late Tuesday afternoon a huge crane, sitting imperially on 
its own three trailers, with a smaller crane used to put it togeth- 
er, arrived under a police escort. 

With darkness falling, the Chicago Fire Department brought 
in its lighting trucks to illuminate the demolition scene. The 
giant crane and its two-ton "headache" ball leveled the shaft 
and chimney to track height. 

The Chicago Department of Inspectional Services brought in 
a crane io pick off the tops of the remaining walls John Dean, 
demolition director for that department, reported that the 
building owner had contacted a wrecking company to raze the 
remainder of his building in the interest of public safety. 

While this was going on, two ironworker crews inspected 
about 200 feet of the 'L' structure in the vicinity of the collapsed 
wall for metal warping or structural cracks. They discovered 
only superficial damage Their work was directed by Glenn 
Zika. planning engineer. 

At 4:40 a.m. Wednesday morning, power was restored to 
the third rails by the power/rail supervisors in the Control 
Center. 



1984 



Vol. 37- No. 1 



11 




CTA workmen at Clinton station wrap up details of the cleanup as 

'L ' service is restored after 26 hours of delay due to a devastating fire in 

sub-zero temperatures. 

At 5 a.m. an out-of-service eight-car train was driven over 
the eastbound track while maintenance personnel stationed at 
columns in the area of the collapsing wall observed the col- 
umns' foundations for any sign of instability. 

At 5:28 a.m. service was restored. 

Restoration of cab signal cable that contains 60 connections 
was done by Dave Barr, signal foreman, and his maintainers 
and supervised by Foreman Steve Zellner, Signal Mainte- 
nance, Central Section. 

Charles Parham, telephone maintenance foreman, and his 
gang made 300 delicate soldering connections in the junction 
box that was rebuilt at the Clinton station. 

George Christensen, unit supervisor, radio and telephone, 
supervised another gang of workers who made 300 splices in 
the damaged telephone cable. 

Gene Hill, utility superintendent, assisted by Jim Sheldon, 
handled the logistics of bringing the supplies to the fire scene 
with various trucks and other vehicles. 



"I think a word of thanks has to be said to the Salvation 
Army," said Pat McCarthy. "They provided free coffee, soup, 
and hearty sandwiches to the firefighters, our workers, and a 
fellow who took video film pictures practically all through the 
night. I think his name is Larry Shriner," McCarthy said. 

Thomas Wolgemuth, manager, Facilities Engineering and 
Maintenance Department, said he was extremely pleased with 
the professional manner and efficiency his personnel displayed 
in repairing the damaged Lake Street 'L' structure. 

"I want to especially acknowledge the outstanding efforts 
made by our laborers and lower echelon personnel who per- 
formed double and triple duty doing hard, sometimes grueling, 
work with fine spirit and dedication. This successful project 
could not have been so without their willing, cooperative 
efforts," Wolgemuth said. 

Fear that the Lake street 'L' structure may have been perma- 
nently, or temporarily crippled lasted just 26 hours. 




Mother Nature 's artistic hand developed this icy scene at Jefferson and 
Lake Streets (looking east) as firemen continue to hose the burning 
structure. Although the signal cable at left is down, the traffic signal 
continues to function. 



Reporter Shriner calls CTA response amazing 




Larry Shriner (left), freelance reporter, donates a video tape of the January 3 multi- 
alarm Lake-Jefferson fire, Chicago's worst in two years, to CTA. Accepting on behalf 
of the Authority is CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli. 



Larry Shriner, WGN radio traffic reporter and 
free lance video cameraman, was at the fire scene 
giving millions of radio listeners his first hand re- 
ports of developments of the fire. 

"Despite sub-zero temperatures, heat from the 
intense fire radiated hundreds of feet from the burn- 
ing six story brick building. Fire fighters and equip- 
ment had to retreat to a safe distance to avoid being 
scorched. 

"Once the walls began to crumble and fall, fire 
fighters were able to move closer and direct larger 
volumes of water on the burning buildings. Until 
then, there was very little they could do as flames 
blew out every window and shot 75 to 100 feet 
through the roofs. 

"Although CTA maintenance repairmen had 
been working on the structure through the night, it 
seemed to me that it might be days or maybe even 
a week before service could be restored. 

"But at 5:27 a.m. the following morning the first 
CTA train passed over the previously damaged 
tracks and structure. 

"It was truly amazing that service was restored 
so quickly." 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



CTA employees participate in a gift to sickle cell 




Skokie Shop foreman James R. House (top hat), worshipful master, Garden City Lodge 59, F&AM, 
presents a $500 check to James H. Dawkins of the Sickle Cell Anemia Midwest Association. 
Other lodge officers present for the donation are (from left) Samuel I. Graham, treasurer; 
Lawrence A. Watts, 69th Street Garage, senior warden; Thurston Hill, junior warden; Past Grand 
Master Alto Clark, and Past Master Ernest L. Johnson, South Shops, lodge secretary. 



Masons of Garden City Lodge 59, 
F&AM presented a $500 donation to 
the Sickle Cell Anemia Midwest Associ- 
ation recently. The southside masonic 
lodge membership includes more than 
20 CTA employees. 

James H. Dawkins, past first vice 
president of the Sickle Cell Midwest 
Association, received the donation in 
a special ceremony. Making the pres- 
entation was Skokie Shops foreman 
James House, Worshipful Master of 
Garden City Lodge. 

Other CTA employees attending 
the ceremony were South Shops fore- 
man Ernest L. Johnson, district deputy 
grand master, past master of Garden 
City Lodge, and lodge secretary; South 
Shops mechanics Milton Britton, 
Levelle Stewart, and Roy Slater, as- 
sistant secretary; laborers William 
Robinson, and Orlando Stanback; 
blacksmith Tobbie Gowans, and elec- 
trician Charles Dickerson. 

Others were 69th Street bus op- 
erators Thomas Washington, and 
Lawrence A. Watts, senior warden, 
and 77th Street bus operators Kevin 
Sparks and Juan McClellan, and 
Delmar Morton, material control, South 
Shops. 



Limits operator finds 
relief in marathons 

Chicago was in awe of the spectac- 
ular running feat, the demonstrated 
athletic prowess, and subsequent finish 
last October 16 by two foreign contest- 
ants in the city's American Marathon- 
Chicago. 

Kenya's Joseph Nzar, and England's 
John Hughes pushed hard in the final 
laps toward the finish line, zipping 
back and forth for the glorious first 
place honor as the African finally, and 
narrowly edged the Englishman by a 
hair's breadth in a little more than two 
hours. 

It was a great show by the two 
visitors to America but hope looms 
that Chicago may soon have a home 
grown champion. It is an idea which 
surely must have crossed many a Chi- 
cagoan's mind, and most certainly has 
crossed the mind of CTA bus operator 
James C. Boyd of Limits Garage, a 
gospel minister and student at Chicago 
Baptist Institute. 




James C. Boyd, Limits bus operator and mar- 
athon runner, zips along at a brisk pace during 
a Saturday morning trek with the Stony Island 
Runners' Club. 



Boyd, a marathon runner for nearly 
eight years, was among the hundreds 
who crossed the finish line behind 
Nzar last fall. He finished in a respecta- 
ble 3 hours, 17 minutes— respectable 
enough in such a gruelling event, to 
warrant observing over the next sev- 
eral months as he prepares for the 
1984 American Marathon-Chicago. 

Boyd's philosophy of the sport prac- 
tically ties running to the soul. "I run 
for spiritual well being as well as for the 
physical benefits derived," he said. "I 
find it stimulating for both mind and 
body. It helps me to relax and to deal 
with everyday stress," he added. 

The Limits bus operator paricipates 
in a minimum of two marathons annu- 
ally. Events in which he has regularly 
participated in more than seven years 
of running include races for Sickle 
Cell, Olive-Harvey College, Loop the 
Loop, the Chicago Lung Association, 
Rosemont Horizon Turkey Trot, the 
American Restaurant Association, and 
the Beverly Ridge Run. 

To stay in shape, Boyd runs at least 
(continues on page 14) 



1984 



Vol. 37-No. 1 



13 



10 miles at each outing, usually be- 
tween 50 and 70 miles per week, un- 
less he is training for a particular event 
which may require a different strategy 
and a different pace. 

His particular training vehicle is the 
Stony Island Runners' Club, a south- 
side organization of dedicated running 
enthusiasts representing a variety of 
careers who meet each Saturday morn- 
ing for a basic 10-mile trek. Usually 
running at his side is Boyd's wife, 
Brenda. The couple's 12-year old son, 
Kenneth, an occasional runner, pre- 
fers biking, said Boyd. 



f 



Your Health 



Hit record 




A new single release recording, "My 
Heart Skips a Beat," by recording artist 
Joydan Prince, was written by the 
singer and her husband, CTA ticket 
agent Afidale Prince. 

Prince, a CTA employee for 20 
years, has also guided his wife's 
career. The recording artist's best seller 
mail order album, "All Time Hits," was 
awarded the Good Time Award by 
Good Time Magazine of Los Angeles 
and Chicago. 

Two songs from the album, "Mid- 
night Train to Georgia," and "For Your 
Precious Love," were popular singles, 
Prince said. He said other songs re- 
corded by his wife include, "I Lost a 
Love," "Hey Mister", and "If I Could 
Live My Life Over Again." 

Joydan has made night club appear- 
ances in Las Vegas, the Chicago area, 
New York and other cities around the 
country. She and her husband Afidale 
are the parents of six children. 



14 



Cigarette smoking 
slows blood flow to brain 

Cigarette smoking slows blood flow 
to the brain and is also the leading risk 
factor for heart attack in women under 
50 years of age, according to recent 
reports of the American Medical 
Association. 

Compared to nonsmokers, cigarette 
smokers (those who smoke more than 
one pack per day) experience a seven 
percent decrease in blood flow to the 
brain. This blood deficit increases the 
risk for stroke, say Robert L. Rogers, 
MA, and colleagues from Baylor Col- 
lege of Medicine in Houston. 

"Smoking seems to be a potent risk 
factor decreasing cerebral blood flow 
probably by enhancing cerebral arteri- 
osclerosis," say the researchers after 
studying 192 smokers and nonsmok- 
ers. "Our present study lends further 
support to long-suspected clinical im- 
pressions that there is increased risk 
for stroke among chronic cigarette 
smokers." 

Smokers experience an even great- 
er blood deficit to the brain if they also 
suffer from other risk factors, such as 
hypertension, hyperlipidemia and dia- 
betes, the researchers add. 

A related report from Boston Uni- 
versity says that of all risk factors asso- 
ciated with nonfatal first heart attacks 
in women under 50 years of age, ciga- 
rette smoking is the most dramatic. 

Lynn Rosenberg, ScD, and col- 
leagues studied more than 1,000 wom- 
en and found that 65 percent of all 
nonfatal first myocardial infarctions 
(heart attacks due to decreased blood 
supply) in women were attributable to 
cigarette smoking. 

"The relative risk of MI increased 
with the amount smoked," say the re- 
searchers. "The estimated risk of myo- 
cardial infarction for current smokers 
of 35 or more cigarettes per day was 
ten times that of women who never 
smoked," they add. 

After smoking, the most prominent 
risk factors were elevated total plasma 
cholesterol levels and decreased levels 
of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. 
Higher levels of high-density lipopro- 
tein cholesterol have been associated 
with reduced risk of coronary heart 
disease. 



Submit retirement 
applications early 

If you're planning to retire soon 
your application should be submitted 
to the Pension Section not later than 
the 14th day of the month preceeding 
the effective date of your retirement. 

As an example , an employee plann- 
ing to retire March 1, 1984, should 
have an application on file with the 
secretary's office on or before 
February 14, 1984. Applications 
should be obtained from the in- 
dividual's department. 

If you work in: You should see: 

Transportation Joe Tunzi 

Rm. 760 - Mart 
Ext. 4159 

Plant Maintenance Mike Rickson 
(West Shops) 3900 W. Maypole 
722-6700 
Ext. 504 



Rail & Surface 
Janitors 



Vehicle 
Maintenance 
(South Shops) 



Surface Janitors 



Operations 
Planning 



Accounts 
Receivable 



Personnel/ 
Area 605 



Leonard Bearty 
Madison & 
Wabash 
263-4434 
Ext. 2274 

Wally Feulner 
7801 S. Vincennes 
874-7100 
Ext. 303 

Harold Berndt 
3900 W. Maypole 
722-6700 
Ext. 408 

Sophia Reynolds 
Rm. 703 - Mart 
Ext. 4071 

John Billis 
Rm. 714 - Mart 
Ext. 4518 

Mary Beth Hurley 
Rm. 742 - Mart 
Ext. 3476 



Rail Vehicle Tom Smith 

Maintenance 3701 Oakton 

(Skokie Shops) 973-3280 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Annual Dinner Dance 

The third annual dinner dance sponsored by 
Painters Local 396 was held -ecently at Zum 
Dutchen Ech. Festivities included a nine course 
dinner, and dancing to the music of Dezeray. 
Enjoying the evening were (1) the Richard Han- 
nigan family; (2) Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hull, South 
Shops; (3) Mr. and Mrs. Erwin Knudsen, West 
Shops; and (4) Don Freebairn.and Mr. and Mrs. 
Rich Chacon, South Shops. 





_ , __ 



\NM\I 1 



* 1)\N(1 




Officers of Local 396 are (seated from left) Jim Downes, vice president; Loid Brown, 
business representative; Jim Haynie, president. Others are (standing) John Norman, 
executive board; John Glatz, recording secretary; John Seay, executive board; Ralph 
Ziegler, warden, and Luther Walker, steward. 






15 



Scouting honors 
Lemons with Silver 
Beaver award 




Walter Lemons, Jr., and his wife, Ida Mae, out- 
side their tent at the Philmont Ranch for Boy 
Scouts near Cimarron, New Mexico. During 
visits to the ranch, Lemons serves as scout- 
master and protestant chaplain, and his wife 
serves as a den leader. 

To Walter Lemons Jr., the phrase, 
"the boy is the father of the man," is 
not a jingle. It's one of life's signposts 
that should not be ignored. 

Since 1948, Lemons has been an 
adult volunteer in the Boy Scouts of 
America and since 1953 he has been 
associated with the Greater Metropoli- 
tan Baptist Church, 5856 S. Wabash 
av., where he serves as scoutmaster 
and troop counselor and his wife, Ida 
Mae, serves as den leader. The couple 
have five grown children. 

"When my wife and I joined Greater 
Metropolitan Baptist church we learned 
it had an inactive scouting program. 
Thanks to the cooperation of other 
adult volunteers in the church, Boy 
Scout Troop No. 188 and Cub Pack 
No. 3188, were brought back to the 
lists of active Boy Scout and Cub Scout 
units," Lemons said. 

Lemons is seniority clerk in the CTA's 
Transportation Department at the Mer- 
chandise Mart and has been a CTA 



employee for 32 years. 

Scouting to some people is a pas- 
time; to Lemons and his wife it is a 
commitment with strong religious over- 
tones. Not only does Lemons act as 
scoutmaster for his troop, he also 
serves as chaplain for the BSA's Mid- 
way District bounded by the lakefront, 
35th street, Dan Ryan expressway, and 
95th street. 

"Many of the boys in this district don't 
have fathers living at home. Their fami- 
lies are headed by their mothers. If 
there is another adult in the family, it's 
usually another woman, a grandmother 
or aunt. Boys, especially those from 
about eight years old through their mid- 
teens, need, and many actually crave, a 
father figure. 

"How else can a developing boy, 
with boyhood instincts and needs, be- 
come a well-rounded, responsible adult 
without a positive adult male to guide 
him through the tempestuous teens?" 
Lemons asked. 

"The distractions caused by drugs, 
promiscuous sexual activity, gangs, and 
sporadic lawlessness can be overcome 
by the developing boy who has a good 
image of himself and knows he has a 
bright future. 

"This kind of boy knows that oppor- 
tunity knocks on the door of the person 
who has prepared himself to meet 
challenges that lead to achievements, 
and he anticipates success in his future 
field of endeavor." 

In 1982, in recognition of his dedica- 
tion to scouting and his religion, Lemons 
was awarded the Good Shepherd Reli- 
gious Award from the National Associ- 
ation of Baptists for Scouting, which 
has its headquarters in Irving, Texas. 
The award is a gold metal cross embla- 
zoned with a shepherd's staff on a red, 
white and blue ribbon. 

This important award goes annually 
to the person who has made signifi- 
cant contributions in scouting and reli- 
gious work for the betterment of youth. 

In January, Lemons received the 
prestigious Silver Beaver Award from 
Chicago Area Council, Boy Scouts of 
America. 

Samuel Nolan, chairman of the Silver 
Beaver Selections Committee, wrote 
Lemons and said, "I am very pleased 
to inform you that the Executive Com- 
mittee approved our recommendation 
and you are to receive this, the highest 
recognition a local Boy Scout Council 
can bestow on its volunteers." 



Lemons also serves as a neighbor- 
hood scouting commissioner working 
with other scout troops on various im- 
provement and educational projects. 
He is past chairman for cub scouting in 
his district, and has served as chaplain 
and leads protestant religious services 
at the famous Philmont Ranch for Boy 
Scouts near Cimarron, New Mexico, 
for 600 adults and 300 to 400 boys en- 
camped there. In addition, he served 
as camp counsellor. 

"My philosophy of life and contin- 
ued dedication to scouting partly came 
from those many, many 'father and 
son' talks I have had with boys during 
35 years of scouting. The rest came 
from my religious training at the Moody 
Bible Institute here in Chicago, teach- 
ing classes in church school, and serv- 
ing as church school superintendent 
for six years," Lemons said. 

"So what does all this prove, you 
probably ask yourself," he continued. 
"Every so often a grown man will come 
up to me, offer his hand, and tell me 
who he is, that I once was his scout- 
master and now he is a success in his 
chosen field. 

"I'm not ashamed to admit I get a 
lump in my throat and develop a husky 
voice now and then when that hap- 
pens. I can feel my soul shout with joy 
and the satisfaction from those words I 
hear cannot be measured in dollars 
and cents. 

"My personal goal in life is to leave 
this world a little better than the way I 
found it." 



New organization invites 
rail fan membership 

A new organization which may be 
of interest to rail fans is open for 
membership. 

The Shore Line Interurban Historical 
Society was formed for persons inter- 
ested in the Chicago North Shore and 
Milwaukee, Chicago South Shore and 
South Bend, and Chicago Aurora and 
Elgin Railroads. 

Members will receive a quarterly 
publication entitled First and Fastest. 
Annual dues are $10 for individuals. 

Information and membership appli- 
cations may be obtained from Shore 
Line Interurban Historical Society, 
P.O. Box 346, Chicago, IL 60690. 



16 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Retirement rookies 

The latest to join CTA pensioners from the Claims Depart- 
ment for some well deserved leisure are (from left) Cecil 
Mimms, John Bosacki, and Rocco Iacullo. Their combined 
service represents 104 years of dedicated employment. An 
open house in their honor was sponsored by Claims Depart- 
ment co-workers. 




Rowbottom 

"All the best" is wished for Harold Rowbottom (right) as he 
retires after 42 years of service with CTA and its predecessors. 
Presenting the transit project representative with a retire- 
ment folder is Harold Hirsch, manager, Operations Planning. 
Co-workers, family members and friends honored Rowbottom 
at a reception in the executive conference room. 




41 Years 

John Boyce, safety standards specialist, and his wife, and 
daughter, Mrs. Lucille Boyce, and Mrs. Karen Ekstrom, ad- 
mire the plaque of memorabilia which was designed by 
Safety Manager Tom Boyle and presented to the retiring 
Boyce in commemoration of his 41 years of service. 




Memorabilia 

Insurance Clerk Jim Burklow and his wife, Gladys, display a 
montage of memorabilia spanning his 37 years of service, 
which began in 1946 with the Chicago Motor Coach Company 
as an extra trainman and later as a streetcar motorman. 
Burklow retired January 1 and now resides in Mt. Vernon, 
Indiana. His Insurance Department co-workers feted him 
and his family with a farewell open house, and presented 
him with a monetary gift. 



1984 



Vol. 37-No. 1 



17 



Birthday /retirement 
bash surprises 
Bill Rooney 




Service Anniversaries 
in January 

35 Years 

Maury Adams, Douglas/Congress 
Robert Desvignes, Transportation 
Robert Flowers, Rail Maintenance 
Henry Fullriede, Materials Mgmt 
Walter Kinnish, Lawndale 
Peter Kourakos, North Park 
Stanley Kubicz, Forest Glen 
Stanley Kuropas, South Shops 
Thomas Lenoir Jr., 77th Street 
Daniel O'Donnell, Equip Engr./Maint. 

30 Years 

John Broadnax, South Shops 
Prestal Carnes, Bus Instruction 
Watkiel Edwards, Central Bus Dist. 
Richard Goldman, Limits 
Ray Hardin, Limits 
Alfred Jackson, Stores- South 
Tomie Jackson, North Avenue 
Charles Lindsay, Lawndale 
Melvin Mitchell, Lawndale 
Thomas Warren, Relief Area-Bus 
Wilson Washington, 77th Street 
John Weber Jr., North Park 
Robert Zimmerman, Forest Glen 

25 Years 

Stanley Andrews, Forest Glen 
Joseph Carlyon, South Shops 
George Cox, Power & Way 
Lincoln Eaton, Forest Glen 
Harvey Heide, Buildings & Grounds 
Charles Kehoe, South Shops 
Louie Lee, 77th Street 
Arthur Plecyk, Skokie Shop 



Kathy O'Malley of the Rolling Mead- 
ows Daily Herald reports that CTA's 
Bill Rooney (Far North Area superin- 
tendent) thought he was going to a 
birthday party for Darlene Cullen, a 
friend, when he discovered that the 
party was really for him. 

"It was a combination birthday/re- 
tirement bash thrown by Bill's wife, 
Mary, who had never been able to sur- 
prise Bill before". Nearly 60 people 
gathered at the Sheraton-Walden Hotel 
in Rolling Meadows to help celebrate 
with dinner and cocktails. 

"Mary figured that Bill's Christmas 
day birthday, and January 1 retire- 
ment after 40 years, was cause enough 
for a big party," so she began planning 
the surprise last September. One cou- 
ple came from as far away as Pitts- 
burgh. Bill's sister of Niagara Falls also 
flew in for the surprise. 

"There were plenty of friends from 
Rolling Meadows on hand as well as the 
Rooney's son Brian, his wife, Bonnie, 



and their six-year old daughter Erin from 
Aurora, and Mary and Bill's daughter, 
Mary J. Rooney of Antioch." 

Mary credits Brian and his wife as 
well as his sister Mary with helping to 
make the affair a memorable event for 
their father. 

A host of Bill's CTA co-workers who 
were also on hand for the farewell 
bash included Michael Veltri, superin- 
tendent, Desplaines/54th terminal; 
Michael LaVelle, director of service; 
Patrick O'Malley, assistant superintend- 
ent, Howard terminal, and Tom Stiglic, 
CTA retired former director of Training. 

Transit Project Representative Harold 
Rowbottom, another Rolling Mead- 
ows resident and friend attending the 
Rooney bash, called the celebration 
one of the finest he has attended. "It's 
the first time I've ever seen Rooney 
speechless," said Rowbottom. Both 
Rowbottom and Veltri will also be- 
come pensioners on January 1 after 
more than 42 years with CTA and pred- 
ecessor companies. 



Edward Schwamb, Transportation 
John Smith, North Avenue 
Chester Tylinski, Archer 



New Pensioners 

December, 1983 

LUTHER BROWN, Rail Janitor, 
Madison & Wabash, Emp. 4-30-68 

CLARENCE DOTSON, Rail Janitor, 
Madison & Wabash, Emp. 9-7-67 

Disability Retirements 

GREGORY ANTHONY, Bus Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 5-23-57 
•ROBERT DENNIS. Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 4-18-66 
GIUSEPPE GERACI, Shop Tractor Oper 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 10-25-71 
ROY HOWARD, Rail Janitor, 

Madison & Wabash, Emp. 12-14-65 
HENRY LAWS, Bus Instructor, 

Training Center, Emp 9-28-50 
MICHAEL NUGENT, Car Repairman, 

Kimball, Emp. 11-3-67 

'Retroactive to 11-1-83 



New Pensioners 

January 1984 

EDWARD ADAMOWSKI, Bank Ldgr Bkpr 11 

Treasury, Emp. 9-15-47 
JAMES ALLEN, Trainman, 

Desplaines, Emp. 2-7-49 
ELMER AUST, Craneman A, 

West Shops, Emp 5-8-41 



THOMAS BANKS, Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 9-17-53 
HENRY BEATY Jr., Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 8-11-48 
LeANDREW BLAKE, Bus Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 1-28-49 
MICHAEL BOGIRA, Car Repairman, 

54th Street, Emp. 8-5-52 
JOHN BOSACKI, Claim Representative, 

Law/Claims, Emp. 10-2-51 
JOHN BOYCE, Safety Strd Spec, 

Safety, Emp. 9-24-42 
HARVEY BROCK, Bus Repairer, 

69th Street, Emp. 6-21-51 
VERNON BURGESS, Asst. Supt., 

Transportation, Emp 3-9-48 
JAMES BURKLOW, Ins. Clerk V, 

Insurance & Pensions, Emp 4-15-46 
THEODORE BURNETT, Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 4-18-52 
WILL CANDY, Bus Operator, 

Lawndale, Emp. 8-24-43 
JOHN CAROLAN. Chief Clerk, 

Jefferson Park, Emp. 11-27-41 
JACK CARTER, Bus Operator. 

Archer, Emp. 7-22-46 
RAYMOND COLELLO, Superintendent 

Lawndale, Emp 10-20-47 
FRANK COLEMAN. Bus & Truck Mech. 

South Shops, Emp 3-12-53 
MARTIN CONNEELY, Car Repairman, 

61st Street, Emp. 6-12-51 
JAMES COONEY, Warehouse Wkr 11, 

South Shops, Emp. 11-5-48 
ROBERT CRANE, Bus Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 7-29-46 
LEONARD DAKE, Bus Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 9-27-47 
BYRON DEAN, Bus Operator, 

Beverly, Emp 10-17-46 
ARMANDO DeBUONO, Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 1-12-48 



18 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



SAM DeVUONO, Carpenter Foreman, 

West Shops, Emp 7- 16-46 
JOSEPH DREW, Bus Operator. 

Beverly. Emp 11-23-53 
LOUIS DRINKA, Elec. Wkr. Ldr. 

South Shops, Emp 5-3-44 
PETER DUFFY, Warehouse Wkr 1, 

South Shops, Emp 2-12-51 
CLAUDE DUNLAP. Car Repairman, 

61st Street, Emp. 7-3-51 
THECLA DUSZYNSKI, Bindery Wkr. Ldr., 

South Shops, Emp 9-11-56 
ROY EVANS, B&T Mech. Foreman, 

South Shops, Emp. 10-11-52 
BENERRAGE FLENAUGH, Ticket Agent, 

Jefferson Park, Emp. 12-31-53 
AMOS FOSTER. Money Handler, 

South Shops, Emp. 8-6-53 
PAUL FRANK. Conductor, 

Jefferson Park, Emp 5-14-48 
SAM GIRARD, Chief Clerk, 
Forest Glen, Emp. 5-6-46 
ANTHONY GR1MALD1, Carpenter, 

South Shops, Emp 5-3-48 
WILLIAM HARRIS Jr.. Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp 11-3-47 
FRANCIS HARTIG, Bus Operator 

Archer, Emp. 2-17-50 
ROLAND HARTNEY, Assignment Clerk, 

95th Street, Emp. 3-28-40 
IRVING HENDERSON, Bus Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 6-11-53 
JAMES HICKMAN, Bus Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 8-13-53 
ATLAS HORN, Sheet Metal Worker, 

South Shops, Emp. 7-16-52 
ROCCO IACULLO, Claim Coordinator, 

Law/Claims, Emp 6-28-46 
EARL JACKSON, Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 11-13-51 
MAXINE JEFFERSON, Agent Supervisor, 

North Section, Emp 6-15-51 
WALTER JENTSCH, Bus Operator. 

North Park, Emp. 3-6-61 
ARCEDUS JONES, Bus Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 11-16-53 
ROLAND JONES, Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 3-17-69 
WILLIAM KALBOTH, Bus Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 8-15-47 
LOUIS KASPER, Warehouse Wkr. 1, 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 9-22-69 
JOSEPH KILCULLEN, Warehouse Wkr. 11, 

South Shops, Emp 12-11-50 
WILLIAM KILLION, Money Handler, 

South Shops, Emp 8-13-53 
JOHN KINCADE, Bus Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 1-25-54 
WILLIAM KLOS, Comm Engr Asst , 

Fac Engr. & Maint., Emp 6-2-75 
ROBERT KOEHLER, Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 7-24-46 
VIRGIL KRUSE, Engr. Asst., 
West Shops, Emp. 1-27-47 
EDWARD KRUSZYNA, Lineman, 

West Shops, Emp. 10-6-48 
CHARLES KUCERA, Controller. 
Control Center, Emp. 2-12-47 
JOHN KURINEC, Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 5-29-46 
LEROY KUTCHINS, Engr. Asst., 

West Shops, Emp. 12-17-41 
JAMES LeMOND, Unit Supervisor, 

West Shops, Emp. 5-20-43 
HUBERT LIGON, Bus Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 7-19-56 
BEN LONGINOTTI, Serv. Truck Chauff., 
West Shops, Emp. 2-14-55 



ROSARIO LOREF1CE, Trackman 11, 

West Shops, Emp 1-11-68 
DONALD MAYER. Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 3-17 58 
CHRISTINE McCORD, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp 5-13-76 
CECIL MIMMS, Claim Rep , 

Law/Claims, Emp. 8-24-48 
FLARZELL MOORE Sr., Asst. Supt , 

Beverly, Emp 6-19-46 
MARTIN MORRISON, Supervisor, 

District A, Emp. 6-30-49 
WILLIAM MURPHY, Chief Clerk, 

Beverly, Emp. 1-27-43 
JOHN NORMAN, Painter, 

South Shops, Emp 5-5-53 
JOHN O'CONNOR, Director, 

Pass. Cont. /Graphics, Emp 6-5-46 
EUGENE PAOLI, Bus Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 10-12-53 
JOHN PELZMAN, Bus Operator, 

Beverly, Emp 10-5-50 
JOSEPH PHILIP Sr., Supervisor, 

District A, Emp. 3-10-58 
TOMIE PHILLIPS, Bus Operator, 

Lawndale, Emp. 8-13-53 
WILLIAM RAPPOLD, Controller, 
Control Center, Emp. 3-24-41 
IKE RIVERS, Mail Clerk, 

Management Services, Emp. 4-11-53 
GEORGE ROBINSON, Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp 4-10-51 
WILLIAM ROONEY, Superintendent, 

Kimball, Emp. 12-22-43 
FRANK ROSS Jr., Machinist Foreman, 

West Shops, Emp. 11-1-39 
HAROLD ROWBOTTOM, Trans. Proj. Rep 

Street Traffic, Emp. 8-17-23 
ANGELO SALVAGGIO, Motorman, 

Desplaines, Emp. 11-1-48 
ROBERT SHEA, Bus Operator, 
North Avenue, Emp. 3-19-41 
JOHN SMITH, Bus Operator, 

Beverly, Emp. 8-1-49 
THOMAS SMITH, Supv , Proc. Rail, 

Rail Shops, Emp 8-24-65 
DALE SOMSEL, Bus Operator. 

North Park. Emp 1-4-46 
RAYMOND SPAKOWSKI, Bus Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 4-27-46 
JOSEPH SPARKS, Janitor, 
West Shops, Emp 2-2-53 
RALPH STEPHENS, Final Assembler, 

Rail Shops, Emp 11-28-52 
LEWIS TAYLOR, Bus Operator, 

Beverly, Emp 6-10-52 
JOHN TIFFY, Clerk, 

Central District, Emp. 5-28-46 
ERNEST TONSIL. Ticket Agent, 

Kimball, Emp. 8-3-53 
MICHAEL VELTRI, Superintendent, 

Congress, Emp 12-18-40 
PAUL VENTICINQUE, Unit Supv., 

Rail Shops, Emp. 5-26-49 
WILLIAM WEBB, Bus & Truck Mech , 

South Shops, Emp. 5-19-47 
ELVIN WHITE, Superintendent, 

77th Street, Emp. 2-24-48 
JESSIE WHITEHEAD, Bus Operator. 

Lawndale, Emp. 10-12-53 
EDWARD WHITING, Lineman. 

West Shops, Emp. 8-1-45 
THEODORE WRIGHT, Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 12-6-48 
WALTER ZAWACKI, Carpenter, 

West Shops, Emp. 3-12-46 
CHESTER ZIELINSKI, Carpenter Leader, 
South Shops, Emp. 5-9-41 



WALTER Z1NKOVICH, Bus Operator, 
North Park, Emp. 3-21-63 

Disability Retirements 

SAMUEL BIBB1NS. Mat'l Handler. 

69th Street, Emp 8-1-60 
HENRY BRUCKER Jr., Bus Operator, 

Transportation, Emp 2-12-68 
LONNIE FIELDS Jr., Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 5-7-70 
MARY GALLAGHER. Ticket Agent. 

West Section, Emp 8-15-64 
VICK SNOW, Cond /Motorman. 

South Section, Emp. 5-25-73 
ROY WILLIAMS, Ticket Agent, 

95th Street, Emp 10-7-70 
•LOYCE WRIGHT. Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp 12-15-66 

'Retroactive to 121 83 



xisr i^E:ivioi^i-A.iva: 



LeROY ARRASMITH, 70, District D, 

Emp. 4-30-42, Died 9-24-83 
JOHN BELLISARIO, 77, Engineering, 

Emp. 4-10-34, Died 10-28-83 
GU1SEPPE BOVINO, 86, Const. & Maint. 

Emp. 3-12-29, Died 10-18-83 
JOHN BRUNELLI, 80, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 7-22-27, Died 10-1-83 
GEORGE CZAJKA, 89, Way & Structs . 

Emp. 5-11-23, Died 10-20-83 
DUDLEY CONEY, 69, Archer, 

Emp. 1-14-44, Died 10-30-83 
CASTRO DAHMER. 80, Beverly, 

Emp. 6-25-26. Died 10-17-83 
FRED DESCH, 77, West Section. 

Emp. 2-9-37, Died 10-17-83 
ROBERT DIETZ, 93, West Shops, 

Emp. 5-10-13, Died 10-20-83 
CHARLES GERARD, 64, South Shops, 

Emp. 6-21-46, Died 10-5-83 
ALBERT HERRMANN, 92, Devon, 

Emp 12-23-19, Died 10-14-83 
GORDON LaCROSSE. 71, Stores-North. 

Emp 9-26-46. Died 10-6-83 
IRMA LUDW1G, 88, North Section, 

Emp. 7-25-45, Died 10-7-83 
OTTO MACRINI, 84. South Section, 

Emp. 4-16-18, Died 10-7-83 
FRANK MATRE, 83. Lawndale, 

Emp. 5-1-26, Died 10 18-83 
FRANK MITTLER, 71, 69th Street. 

Emp 5-16-46. Died 10-24-83 
JOHN NEWMAN. 68. Archer. 

Emp. 5-28-46. Died 9 30-83 
JULIA O'CONNOR. 87. North Section. 

Emp. 1-19-27, Died 10-21-83 
LARS PEDERSEN, 65. North Park. 

Emp. 7-30-47, Died 10-10-83 
ELMER REIMANN, 81, North Section. 

Emp. 9-21-37, Died 10-26-83 
FRANK SCHEUBERT. 81. Engineering. 

Emp. 3-23-20, Died 10-2-83 
JOHN SPOO, 75, District B. 

Emp. 9-29-36, Died 10-2-83 
ARLENE SWANSON. 77, West Section, 

Emp. 5-18-51, Died 10 17-83 
BENEDICT TOLVAIS, 92, 77th Street, 

Emp. 6-9-16, Died 9-24-83 
EDWARD TONER Jr., 63, West Shops, 

Emp. 9-29-75, Died 10-19-83 
PETER YUSKA, 65, 77th Street, 

Emp. 2-14-45, Died 10-27-83 



7984 



Vol. 37-No. 1 



19 




The first social event of the 1984 
calendar for the CTA Pioneers Retire- 
ment Organization will be a Valentine 
Day party set for February 14, it was 
announced last month. 

Other calendar events planned for 
the new year include a Mother's Day 
party May 8; Back to School party, 
September 11, and a Christmas party, 
December 11. 

The pioneers meet the second Thurs- 
day of each month at the Golden 
Flame Restaurant, Nagle and Higgins 
avenues at 12:30 p.m. For additional 
information, telephone Secretary 
Walter Steinbeiss at 334-9386. 



New officers of the CTA Pioneers Retirement Organization are (from left) Mel Horning, first vice 
president; George Nash, second vice president; Frank Koziol, president; Warren Scholl, treasurer, 
and Walter Steinbeiss, secretary. The new slate of officers were introduced to the membership at 
the organization 's annual Christmas party. 



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CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume 37 Number 1 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Department. 
Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 

Editor: Rick Willis 

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r l 










Third rail 
round up 
winner 
recounts 
D.C.- 
Metro visit 




1984 Volume 37-Number 2 

Transit News 






Robert Sanders. Howard Terminal 
motorman and Third Hail Round-up 

winner, is congratulated by U.S. 

Senator Alan J. Dixon (D-lll.) in 

Dixon 's Washington office. 
Sanders presented Dixon with a 
Third Rail Round-Up belt buckle. 

The Senator presented Sanders 

with passes to the U.S. Senate 

visitor's gallery and to the Senate 

dining room. 



Motorman Robert Sanders of the Howard terminal 
is still shaking his head in disbelief. 

"That first-place prize— that all-expense paid trip to 
Washington I won in the Third Rail Round-Up competition 
was just too good to be true. Now that I look back on that 
wonderful week of November 5 through 11, I'm anxious 
to try again in the next Third Rail Round-Up," he said. 

After being feted by CTA officials and Transportation 
Department staff members, Sanders flew from Chicago's 
Midway Airport to Washington's National Airport on a two 
and a half hour flight on Midway Air Lines on November 
5. He stayed in the Ramada Inn, 14th Street and Rhode 
Island Avenue, about a dozen blocks from the White 
House. 

The next day he took a motoring trip of the famous 
landmarks of the nation's capitol including the Kennedy 
Center for the Performing Arts. That evening he dined in 
Blackie's House of Beef restaurant, known for its 1930s 
decor and delicious prime rib dinners. It was the first of 
many excellent restaurants he enjoyed. 

On Monday, November 7, Sanders, with invitation in 
hand, visited Washington's Metro subway system. What 
he saw, and learned, amazed him. 

"When I think of Washington's Metro subway now, the 
first word that comes to my mind is— lavish. I mean every- 
thing about it is lavish. It's computerized, space age, ultra- 
modern, world class, the best," he said, describing the 
42-mile long rapid transit system that took years to build 



at a cost of $8 billion. 

Escorted by James Redding, Metro's assistant superin- 
tendent, Sanders toured the subway, surface, and elevated 
portions of the new system. Its stations have automatic 
fare collecting devices where zone fares are paid and the 
machines even make change. A one-way trip from one 
end of the Metro to the other costs $3. 

Boarding one of the six-car trains, with 75-foot-long 
cars, Sanders was startled to find that each train, as 
Redding explained, has a one-person crew. There are 
no conductors. 

"That one crewman is called an operator, not a motor- 
man. His job is to announce the stations and to stop the 
train if necessary with his train's cineston (power control 
handle). Otherwise, computers do everything — start the 
train, govern its speed, stop at stations, and open and 
close car doors," said Sanders. 

Metro's cars can carry 175 persons, have wall-to-wall 
carpeting, fluorescent lighting, air conditioning, and can 
go up to 75 miles per hour. 

The transit agency has its own headquarters building 
where special passes are required just to go from floor 
to floor. 

"Metro's central control somewhat resembles the CTA's 
Control Center. The important difference is that Metro's 
controllers can adjust the speeds of trains from central con- 
trol," Sanders said. 

(Continued on page 2) 



4? ^ 


jug 




l'*r*& 




^— 



Robert Sanders (right) receives his prize, an all-expenses paid trip to 
Washington, from Elonzo Hill, director of Training and Instruction. Join- 
ing the informal ceremony are David Martin (left), area superintendent, 
Central, and Dennis Closs. superintendent, Howard Terminal. 

Later, Sanders visited Metro's train repair shop that 
resembles CTA's Skokie Shop, and a train yard capable 
of storing 300 cars that is operated by one switchman and 
one towerman. 

Bidding farewell to Redding and Metro, he went to 
Baltimore and toured its recently completed transit line 
that is very similar in design to Washington's Metro but 
is only eight miles long. Baltimore's transit line cost $797 
million. 

"Some of the stations have a visitor's area where per- 
sons can look down into the subway tube and see trains 
coming and going. This area is on the mezzanine level," 
Sanders recalled. 

The following day, November 8, Sanders visited the 
headquarters of the American Public Transit Association. 

At 2:30 p.m., Sanders met with Sen. Alan Dixon of 
Illinois in his Senate building office. There, he presented 
Dixon with a CTA Third Rail Round-Up belt buckle. In 
return, Dixon gave Sanders passes to the Senate dining 
room and visitor's gallery above the floor of the Senate. 

"During a debate on the senate floor a door slowly 
opened and in walked Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. I finally 
had the opportunity to see him in person in the Senate," 
Sanders said. 

"I admire that man for all he has gone through and 
suffered and still bears himself like the true gentleman 
that he is— and the fine family he represents." 

Later, Sanders visited the graves of the Kennedy brothers 
at the front of the Lee-Custis mansion in Arlington 
National Cemetery and toured the cemetery marked by 
its precise rows of white crosses. 

Rounding out his week-long visit, Sanders went to the 
White House and the Smithsonion Institution, visiting its 
space museum and modern art gallery. 

One of the last things Sanders did in Washington was 
to go to the Watergate Apartments and to the door which 
was forced open one night in June, 1972, by Nixon 
Administration agents. The incident led to the Watergate 
Investigation. 

On Friday morning he boarded a plane for his flight 
back to Chicago, back to his friends, and back to work. 



From the Chairman 



Safety is no accident 



Congratulations to all CTA employees for making 
1983 the safest year in CTA history and especially for 
re-establishing this record for the third year in a row 

Safe operation is one of our most significant accom- 
plishments because it instills confidence in our service 
among the riding public and proves that we are making 
proper use of riders' fares and public funding. Constant 
improvement of safety records also demonstrates that 
all CTA employees are dedicated to serving the public, 
because safe operations can only result through safety 
consciousness and coordinated effort by operating, 
maintenance, supervisory, and instruction personnel. 
Once again, congratulations on this fine accomplish- 
ment, and let's strive to set a new record in 1984. 

In recent years, many employee incentive, improve- 
ment, and training programs have been instituted at 
CTA which have certainly contributed to service im- 
provements. Our report in this issue on the trip to Wash- 
ington awarded to Third Rail Roundup winner Robert 
Sanders reminds us that many self-improvement and 
career development programs will continue to be of- 
fered throughout the Authority this year. I urge all those 
of you who are eligible to participate in these programs, 
because they will certainly lead to greater accomplish- 
ments for yourselves and the Authority. 

My fellow Board members and I are also delighted 
that the membership of Locals 241 and 308, ATU, have 
voted favorably on the amendments to the Retirement 
Plan. By doing so, you have demonstrated your confi- 
dence in the health of our Pension Fund and your com- 
mitment to providing cost-effective service for CTA rid- 
ers. Although it is necessary for CTA to suspend Pension 
payments and to defer the loan to the Pension Fund in 
order to have a balanced 1984 Budget, the amended 
Retirement Plan assures employees of job security while 
continuing to provide many Pension benefits. 



*.JlJi/j 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Mayor and CTA chairman dedicate Polk Street Station 




CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli (left), and Mayor Harold Washington review plaque honoring Dr. David Jones Peck for whom the Polk Street 'L ' 
station is dedicated. Dr. Peck, an 1847 graduate of Rush Medical College, was the first American Black to receive a Doctor of Medicine degree from 
an American medical school. photo by Antonio Dickey 



Mayor Harold Washington and CTA 
Chairman Michael A. Cardilli dedicated 
CTA's newly rebuilt Polk Street/West 
Side Medical Center rapid transit sta- 
tion January 17 in memory of Dr. David 
Jones Peck. 

Doctor Peck was graduated from 
Rush Medical College in 1847 and was 
the first American Black to receive a 
Doctor of Medicine degree from an 
American medical school. 

The inscription on the plaque reads: 



Polk Street Station of the Chicago 
Transit Authority, which serves the 
West Side Medical Center, was dedi- 
cated on the 17th day of January, in 
the year 1984 to the memory of Dr. 
David Jones Peck. 

Dr. Peck was graduated from Rush 
Medical College in 1847, and was the 
first American black to receive a Doc- 
tor of Medicine degree from an Ameri- 
can medical school. 



Harold Washington, Mayor 
City of Chicago 
Michael A. Cardilli, Chairman 
Chicago Transit Authority 

The new $2.6 million steel and con- 
crete 'U station along the Douglas 
branch of the Congress-Douglas-O'Hare 
rapid transit route replaces a small 
91-year-old brick station built in the 
era of Chicago's World's Columbian 
Exposition of 1893. 

"This Polk Street station is part of 
the CTA's ongoing commitment to 
modernization and revitalization of its 
facilities," Chairman Cardilli said. "The 
station design incorporates both pano- 
ramic windows and bright fluorescent 
lighting to provide beauty, as well as 
increased security for our riders." 

Architects of the Design/Construc- 
tion Section of the CTA's Facilities 
Engineering/Maintenance Depart- 
ment designed and planned the entire 
project. 



A unique feature of the new station 
is its H-shaped canopy, which covers 
both 425-foot-long trackside concrete 
platforms. The passenger waiting areas 
are each 40 feet long and 16 feet deep, 
and have six infrared heaters for use 
during cold weather. 

The station has two elevators pro- 
viding complete access to both plat- 
forms for physically disabled riders. 

Glass walls erected on the station's 
front and two sides make its interior 
highly visible from the street. Riders 
waiting for No. 37 Sedgwick/Ogden 
buses and other transportation will 
also benefit from the two sets of infra- 
red heaters just inside the building. 

The station will also have a "hotline" 
to the University of Illinois Medical 
Center for emergencies. 

The project was funded by the U.S. 
Department of Transportation and the 
Illinois Department of Transportation. 
The station was built by John Burns 
Construction Co., Orland Park. 



7984 Vol. 37-No. 2 



New rail supervisors 




Edward Tribue (third from left), and Mary Fryar, were named rail service super- 
visors in the West rail district, effective January 15. The appointments were made 
by Transportation Manager Harry Reddrick (left). Others attending the promotion 
ceremony were Robert Desvignes, director, Administration and Performance 
Control, and Michael LaVelle, director of Service. Ms. Fryar becomes the first 
woman to be appointed to an operations rail service supervisory position. She is a 
veteran of 10 years CTA service while Tribue has 15 years of service. 



Management theory 




Showing off their certificates of training following completion of a 15-day manage- 
ment theory and skills orientation are (from left) controllers Luster Morton and 
John Betourne, and assistant superintendents Elvin Carey and Andrew Bishop. 
The program, developed by Bill Sholdice, superintendent, Training Development, 
provides orientation for assistant superintendents and controllers to management 
and professional theory and skills. The training covers such subjects as communi- 
cations, motivation, leadership, problem solving, decision making, report writing, 
employee assistant program, and contract negotiations. 



CTA '83 traffic, 
rider accidents 
lower than ever 

CTA did it again in 1983. For the 
third year in a row, reports of traffic 
and passenger accidents were lower 
than ever before, making 1983 the saf- 
est year in CTA history. 

CTA recorded 5.1 accidents per 
100,000 miles of operation in 1983, or 
7 percent fewer than the previous low 
of 5.5 set in 1982. 

"We're very proud of this new re- 
cord," said Executive Director Bernard 
Ford, "and we hope the riding public 
will appreciate how much of a coordi- 
nated effort it represents. 

"Improved performance by bus op- 
erators and rail personnel is just part of 
the answer," Ford added. "We also 
have to recognize the contributions of 
supervisors and instructors, as well as 
our safety and maintenance depart- 
ments. They have all done a fine job, 
and we hope to make 1984 even 
better." 

According to Safety Department 
Manager Tom Boyle, CTA's 2,275 
buses and 1,200 rapid transit cars 
were operated almost 125 million 
miles in 1983. He said the current fleet 
averaged 19,608 miles between traffic 
or passenger accidents per vehicle, 
compared to only 4,785 miles in 1947. 

That was the year CTA took over 
operation of 3,026 streetcars, 787 
motor buses and 152 trolley buses 
from the Chicago Surface Lines, and 
1,616 rapid transit cars from the Rapid 
Transit Company. 

Boyle said the improved safety re- 
cord for 1983 translates into savings of 
more than three-quarters of a million 
dollars in claims and related costs. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Chairman Cardilli announces top management reorganization 

71 




Six deputy executive director posi- 
tions, and a deputy general attorney 
have been established in a reorganiza- 
tion of top level CTA management. All 
will report to Executive Director Bernard 
J. Ford. 

CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 
said the new positions were established 
to provide better management and 
greater efficiency. 

The deputies are veteran CTA em- 
ployees and represent a cross section 
of management personnel. 

The changes were effective March 1. 

The new positions and persons fill- 
ing those positions are: 

— Deputy Exectuve Director, 
Finance— Paul J. Kole. 
Responsible for Field Review, 
Insurance/Pensions, Financial 
Services, and Treasury. 

— Deputy Executive Director, 



Operations — Harry Reddrick. 

Responsible for all bus and rail 
transportation. 
Deputy Executive Director, 
Administration — Not filled. 
Responsible for Materials Man- 
agement, Datacenter, and Safety. 
Deputy Executive Director, 
Human Resources— Frederick 
G. King. 

Responsible for Personnel Ad- 
ministration, Affirmative Action, 
Community Affairs, and Man- 
agement Services. 
Deputy Executive Director, 
Planning and Development- 
Ernest Sawyer. 

Responsible for Strategic Plan- 
ning, Operations Planning, and 
Capita] Development. 
Deputy Executive Director, 
Maintenance/Engineering— 



George Millonas. 

Responsible for Facilities Engi- 
neering/Maintenance, and Equip- 
ment Engineering/Maintenance. 
— Deputy General Attorney- 
Ronald F. Bartkowicz. 
Responsible for Law, Labor Re- 
lations, Claims, Worker's Com- 
pensation, and Real Estate. 
Also reporting to the executive direc- 
tor are Manager, Budget — Jud Lawrie 
and Manager, Public Affairs— C 
William Baxa. 

Under the present structure of CTA, 
the new deputies hold the following 
positions: Kole, Group Manager, Fi- 
nance; Reddrick, Manager, Transpor- 
tation; King, Group Manager, Human 
Resources; Sawyer, Manager, Strate- 
gic Planning; Millonas, Manager, Equip- 
ment Engineering/Maintenance; and 
Bartkowicz, Assistant General Attorney. 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 2 



Beverly gets 
equipment for 
petroleum disposal 

A major project to control the 
disposal of petroleum wastes was 
completed recently at Beverly garage. 
North Park was the site of the first such 
project four years ago. The new Ked- 
zie garage has pollution control equip- 
ment built in, while similar features are 
included in the design for another new 
garage at 103rd and Stony Island 
Avenue. 

The Design and Construction sec- 
tion, headed by Chris Kalogeras, 
director, began drawing up plans for 
the Beverly facilities after federal tund- 
ing for the project was secured in 
1981. The new system has been oper- 
ational since last September. 

F.H. Petzold, mechanical engineer, 
was manager of the Beverly project, 
which involved the installation of a 
20,000-gallon oil/water separator and 
drainage line connections to the out- 
door bus parking area south of the 
garage structure. Drainage lines were 
also extended inside the garage, con- 
necting the hoist pit and other work 
areas to the new system. 

The $225,000 pollution control 
facilities at Beverly require very little 
maintenance or attention. Once a 
year, the settling basins and separator 
are to be inspected for sand or other 
solids which may have accumulated so 
they can be removed. 

Meanwhile, oil is collected in a 
2,000-gallon compartment in the sep- 
arator. A remote level gauge in the 
garage shows when the compartment 
is full so a scavenger can be called to 
remove it. 

CTA benefits from the process be- 
cause the scavenger pays for the waste 
oil, which is then recycled for reuse. 

The 20,000-gallon separator unit 
was manufactured by Hardee Steel 
Fabricators Inc., near Tampa, Florida, 
and was transported to Beverly by 
truck. It was one of the largest pieces 
of equipment legally permitted to be 
moved by road. 




F.H. Petzold (left), CTA project manager, and David Cowart, quality control manager for Hardee 
Steel Fabricators Inc., inspect the 20,000-gallon oil/water separator unit for Beverly garage at the 
Hardee plant near Tampa, Florida. 




Knowing when to contact 
social security is vital 

Virtually all of us will have the need 
to contact the social security office at 
sometime in our lives. What is espe- 
cially important however, is to know 
when that contact should be made. 

According to the Social Security 
Administration, general guidelines one 
should follow regarding when to con- 
tact the local social security office are: 

• Before getting that first job inas- 
much as a social security number is 
needed to get the proper social securi- 
ty earnings credited. This should be 
done at least two weeks before a new 
job holder begins working. 

• After a death in the family in order 
to collect survivor benefits. 

• When a family member is disabled 
in order to collect disability benefits if 
payable. 



• Upon retirement— at 65 for full 
rate cash benefits, or as early as 62 for 
reduced benefits. Individuals should 
sign up for Medicare two or three 
months before reaching age 65, even 
if there are no retirement plans. 

• Anytime there is a question about 
social security. 

Information is always available at 
the local social security office on how 
much work credit is needed to be in- 
sured for benefits, who receives bene- 
fits, how to replace a lost social secur- 
ity or medicare card, how to get a free 
statement of the earnings credited to 
your social security record, and what 
documents are needed when applying 
for benefits. 

Additional information about social 
security is also available by contacting 
the Social Security Teleservice Center 
at 725-8838. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Honor 12 for 
heroic actions 

Twelve Equipment Engineering & 
Maintenance employees assigned to 
Archer garage were presented with 
Special Recognition Awards for help- 
ing to extinguish a fire on a bus in the 
garage last August 5. They were com- 
mended for "their quick actions and 
joint effort in preventing further dam- 
age to the garage and other equip- 
ment, thereby saving the Authority 
great expense." 

Receiving the awards were Robert 
Adamczyk, Carmen Alletto, Anthony 
Blazevich, James Conway, Salvatore 
DeStefano, Edward Havlicek, James 
Moone, Patrick Murphy, Anthony 
Pajkos, Lorenzo Rodriguez, David 
Thompson Jr. and Robert Woods. 

Two other Archer employees re- 
ceived awards for another act of hero- 
ism at the garage July 5. Robert 
Vandiver, a bus operator, and Brian 
Grabowski, relief foreman, were cited 
for responding quickly to a fire outside 
bay 2. 

After noticing the fire, they im- 
mediately alerted the Control Center 
and asked for medical attention for an 
injured employee. They then moved 
buses out of danger and used fire ex- 
tinguishers to control the blaze until 
firemen arrived. 



First Aid Training 



New Uniforms 




Selected bus operators representing all 10 garage locations are modeling a new 
uniform to test its durability and maintenance cost as they share in the decision 
making process of bus operators' changing fashions. Encouraged by officials of 
Amalgamated Transit Union 241 and Transportation management's cooperation 
to consider a different garb for CTA bus operators, male and female employees 
are expected to model the new uniform for approximately four months. The new 
attire is similar in color to apparel CTA bus operators have worn for more than 20 
years, but is lighter in weight, and offers an option of a coat or Ike jacket. 




W.C. Roman, director of Stores (standing, left), presents certificates of recognition to volunteer Stores department personnel 
for completion of a Red Cross first aid and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training. The volunteers are (seated from 
left) Leon Harris, Charles Turner, Jim McMahon, Reginald Ramsey, and Walter Griffin, Others are (standing) Roman, Jack 
Lira, Cleophas Fultz, and John Gill, supervisor who coordinated the program with the American Red Cross. In addition. 
Gerald Paces received special recognition for completing the CPR modular instructor training. Classes were held at Red 
Cross headquarters, 43 East Ohio street. 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 2 



Firemen, paramedics learn CTA rail sale' 




Lt. Paul Sobczak (left, with clipboard). Chicago Fire Academy instructor, and eight fire fighters or paramedics who completed the course offered by CTA Sep 
Department personnel. 





A fire fighter applies a \ack under train 's truck uti 
guides "hands on" procedure. 

•^ Jack Thompson shows fire fighters how wooded 
from tracks so that objects can be removed frQ > 



y procedures 




hr through November each year lor Chicago Fire 





Rail instructor Gerald West demonstrates to Chicago Fire Department personnel the correct, and 
sale, way to step over third (power) rails in Kimball train yard Fire and paramedic personnel are 
undergoing safety procedures by Transportation Department's Rail Training Section 



ise wheels off the tracks Instructor Thompson (right) 



K'?s are placed under train's wheels to elevate wheels 
tr,?r wheels. 



A training program to familiarize 
5.000 Chicago fire fighters and para- 
medics with the rapid transit system's 
safety and emergency procedures is 
sparking great interest in the Chicago 
Fire Department's ranks. 

Lieutenant Paul Sobczak. an instruc- 
tor at the Chicago Fire Department 
Academy, said learning to walk safely 
on CTA tracks and structures, working 
near high voltage equipment, and learn- 
ing the dos and don'ts of safety proce- 
dures is helping ease concern in the 
Fire Department ranks. 

"This valuable program, started by 
the CFD and the CTA in 1982. is help- 
ing our fire fighters and our paramed- 
ics to more quickly apply their skills 
where they are most needed on the 
rapid transit system with confidence." 
Sobczak said. 

This "hands-on" training program, 
held three times a day. three days a 
week, is conducted in CTA rail terminal 
yards by members of the Transporta- 
tion Department's Training and Instruc- 
tion Section and the Utility Section of 
the Facilities Engineering and Mainte- 
nance Department 

Groups of about 15 fire fighters and 
paramedics are given detailed instruc- 
tion on a number of procedures: then 
all members of the group are asked to 
go through the procedures so they may 
experience them first hand and gain 
confidence. 

Elonzo Hill, director of Training and 
Instruction. Transportation Depart- 
ment, has assigned 29 members of his 
staff to take part in the program on a 



rotating basis C Len Wiksten. direc- 
tor of Facilities Maintenance. Facilities 
Engineering and Maintenance Depart- 
ment, has members of his Utility Sec- 
tion teaching the program along with 
the training instructors- 
Arthur Hubbard, superintendent. 
Rail Instruction, stressed that fire fight 
ers and paramedics must have confi 
dence in working on the I. system not 
only in daylight, but at night and undei 
foul weather conditions. 

"Besides providing their various 
skills, the fire fighters and paramedics 
must keep in mind that time also is a 
critical factor on mi ist of our L' routes, 
especially in rush periods, these tram 
ing sessions are designed to help them 
quickly get to where they are needed. 
perform their duties, and depart as 
quickly as they came." Hubbard said 
"The purpose of this program." 
added Eugene Hill, area superintend 
ent. Utility Section, "is to familiarize 
Fire Department personnel with the 
operation of the rail system, safetv, 
procedures, and equipment, and to 
promote understanding of what they 
can expect when they are working on 
the right-of-way." 

The training of Fire Department per 
sonnel runs the gamut of instruction 
from the proper method of carrying 
equipment while on the tracks to jack- 
ing procedures for raising a rail car from 
the tracks to remove anything under 
the wheels 

Trainee ee dem< mstratii ins which 

providi such pertinent information .is 

How. standard hand, flag and Ian- 




Fire fighters practice climbing up side of train 
using recessed foot ladder and hand rail. 

tern signals are used to alert oncoming 
train motormen. 

- The safe way to walk on or near 
the rail right-of-way. 

- Standard procedure to use when 
trains approach and what to do when 
they pass. 

- The difference in the appearance 
and function between third (power) 
rails and running rails. 

- The non-touch removal of a per- 
son in contact with the third rail. 

- Boarding and exiting disabled 
trains. 

- The use of water-type and dry 
chemical fire extinguishers. 

- How to isolate a rail car from the 
power rail. 

- How to use platform spreaders 





Jack Thompson, Utility Section supervisor-chauffeur, instructs fire personnel how to remove snow 
plows from 'L' car and how to move drawbar from side to side. 

"23UT 




Rail Instructor Sam Chilia demonstrates use of passenger evacuation planks carried on trains. 
Planks allow riders to go from a disabled train to one pulled up parallel to it. 



Instructor West tells fire personnel how to use 
door emergency cord and how to disconnect 
door fuses behind overhead panel. 



that push a rail car away from the plat- 
form when needed. 

Firemen and paramedics were also 
warned that long wet raincoats or 
other garments touching the power rail 
will expose the wearer to electrical 
shock, and learned that metal fast- 
eners on garments can be attracted by 
a "live" power rail acting as a magnet. 

Chicago Fire Commissioner Louis 
T Galante expressed his appreciation 
for the CTA's willingness to assist in 
providing this specialized training for 
members of the Fire Department. 

"I am most impressed with the ex- 
cellent cooperation extended by the 
CTA in the past and I hope that these 
mutual efforts will continue into the 
future," Commissioner Galante said. 

"I've monitored many of the classes 
and I've yet to see a fire fighter or par- 
amedic who was not attentive. Some 
of the questions asked of our instruc- 
tors early in the program helped us re- 



fine the presentation from their point 
of view," said James Zepp, assistant 
superintendent, Rail Instruction. 

"We have had 840 Fire Department 
personnel successfully complete the 
training for this training period," said 
Elonzo Hill. 

"This group includes six deputy dis- 
trict chiefs, 19 captains, 55 lieutenants, 
66 engineers, 70 battalion chiefs, 287 
fire fighters, and 337 emergency med- 
ical service personnel (paramedics). 

"This important training program 
is scheduled to continue until about 
5,000 Fire Department personnel have 
completed it. 

"This is one important way the CTA 
can help those who help the CTA," 
Hill added. 

In addition to Chicago fire fighters, 
CTA has given the same instructions to 
fire fighters of Cicero, DesPlaines, Oak 
Park, Park Ridge, Rosemont, and 
Skokie. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Fourth quarter 

Public Safety Awards 

Beverly garage, 
Kimball terminal 
earn safety awards 

Public Safety awards for the fourth 
quarter of 1983 were presented to 
Beverly Garage and Kimball Terminal. 
It was the 20th PSA award for the 
south side garage, and the first since 
the fourth quarter of 1982. 

Beverly took the award with a traffic 
rate of 3.07 accidents per 100,000 
miles, a 43 per cent better rate than 
the bus system rate of 5.41. Beverly 
experienced a passenger rate of 0.50 
—one accident for every 200,000 miles 
of operation. 

Safety officials said this rate was 61 
per cent better than the bus system 
rate of 1.28. Beverly had 55 accident- 
free days during the fourth quarter 
of 1983. 

At Kimball Terminal meanwhile, it 
was the fifth Public Safety award for 
that facility, and the terminal's first 
since the third quarter of 1982. Kim- 
ball had a perfect quarter experiencing 
no traffic or passenger accidents, and 
therefore 92 accident-free days. 

Attend Cleveland 
COMTO conference 

Approximately 50 members of the 
Conference on Minority Transportation 
Officials (COMTO) representing CTA/ 
RTA Chicago attended the February 
17-18 Greater Cleveland Chapter, 
Regional 4 conference. 

The Cleveland. Ohio chapter was 
COMTO host to members from 25 
transit properties and related business- 
es, and provided seminars on labor re- 
lations, minority enterprises, and using 
computers. The workshops thrust em- 
phasized the importance of these func- 
tions as they relate to the transit industry. 

The conference theme, "The Eco- 
nomic, Cultural and Political Impact of 
Transit on the Minority Community," 
was the primary source of develop- 
ment of the workshops and other meet- 
ings. Conferees also heard reports 
from U.S. EEO Commissioner Chester 
Gray on the changing employment 
patterns in the public sector. Other offi- 
cials spoke on increasing MBE partici- 
pation in the minority community. 




Bernard Henderson, superintendent, Beverly garage, holds the Interstation Safety plaque which 
the southside garage received for the fourth quarter of 1983. Sharing the honors are (from left) Alex 
Johnson, director, Transportation Personnel; Robert Julun, assistant superintendent, Beverly; 
Michael McCarthy, principal public safety analyst who presented the plaque, and Tom Reilly, area 
superintendent, Far South. 




Tom Boyle (left) manager, Safety, presents the Interstation Safety contest plaque to Nick Blaino, 
superintendent at Kimball terminal. 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 2 



11 



Commendation Corner 




Ruth Calhoun (North Avenue 
garage) was appreciated by 
Muriel Gunderson, of Augusta 
Boulevard, for her courteous 
operation of a No. 66 Chicago 
bus. "She changed my mind 
about buses. She was courte- 
ous, smiling and kind. She 
pulled the bus slowly up to 
the curbs so as not to splash 
riders, and so they wouldn 't 
have to step into water before 
boarding the bus. When people 
were running for the bus, she 
would wait, sometimes stopping 
a little short of the stop to allow 
them to board. Also, she called 
out the stops and said, 'Have 
a nice evening' to departing 
riders. Thank you for hiring such 
a sweet lady." 



Wafer Carter (69th Street garage) was admired by 
Mrs. Gene Subos, of South Union Avenue, for his han- 
dling of a No. 44 Wallace/Racine bus. "He was so pleas- 
ant and informative. He called every stop loud and clear, 
and also gave information about connecting buses. If a 
bus connected with a point of interest, he gave that infor- 
mation, too. There were no jerky stops. Everything was 
smooth and really pleasant. 1 have been riding buses for a 
great many years, and I can't remember when I enjoyed a 
ride as much. This man is doing an excellent job for 
theCTA." 

John Lemond (North Park garage) was applauded by 
Ruth Mix, of North Paulina Street, for "doing his job 
well" on a No. 22 Clark bus. "He held his ground all the 
way (from the Loop) to Irving Park Road by prohibiting 10 
or 15 passengers from depositing dollar bills in the fare 
box. When he saw a passenger with a bill in hand, he 
placed his hand over the fare box and asked if they didn't 
have change. Two or three actually did. The others he told 
to try to get assistance from other passengers with change, 
which they did. If more drivers would follow suit, maybe 
the public guilty of breaking your rules might wake up." 

Charlotte Brent (North Section) won the approval of 
Yvette Price, of Oglesby Avenue, for "the gracious man- 
ner in which she performs her duties as a ticket agent (at 
Grand/State). She takes the time to say, 'Hello,' 'Thank 
You,' 'Have a good day,' etc. Many torn-faced patrons 
cross this woman's path, including myself, only to leave 
the ticket window with a new-born smile. As a staff mem- 
ber in a personnel operation, I am aware of the impor- 
tance of an organization's 'first impression,' projected by 
employees in a public contact capacity. I commend your 
employee for her exemplary performance." 



r-*r~ 



f 


^*flrn 


j 


\ 



David Rossie (Archer garage) 
was praised by Paula Marszalek, 
of South Hamlin Avenue, for his 
performance as operator of a 
No. 61 Archer/Franklin Express 
bus. "He is extremely polite, 
considerate and kind. Every 
passenger that boards his bus 
receives a cheery 'Good 
morning!' and everyone that 
alights is cautioned to 'Watch 
your step. ' He has never 
hesitated to take the time to 
give directions. If an elderly or 
handicapped person boards, 
he ensures that the person is 
seated before starting up. 
When faced with a rude 
passenger, he manages to 
remain polite. Obviously, he 
enjoys his work and takes 
pride in it." 



Eugene Reid (Limits garage) was commended by 
Martha Kaplan, of Wrightwood Avenue, for his alertness 
on a No. 151 Sheridan bus. "He had just stopped to pick 
up some passengers when suddenly he called out to us to 
watch our purses, having recognized three young men 
getting ready to board the bus as pickpockets. He also 
alerted the young lady ahead of the men that they were 
after her purse. Then, in no uncertain terms, he told the 
three that he did not want them on his bus, and they 
didn't get on. Here was a man who was concerned for his 
passengers. We were all grateful." 

Robert Richardson (North Park garage) was the oper- 
ator of a No. 147 Outer Drive Express bus that John 
Scanlon, of Lakewood Avenue, rode several times. "He 
drives with finesse, smoothly and carefully, which appar- 
ently is difficult to do with the new articulated buses. He 
doesn't badger riders. He seems to be kind. Because he is 
quietly efficient, in addition to being an excellent driver, 
he probably won't be noticed. At a time when the ordi- 
nary citizen must put up with so much misuse of power, a 
smooth, pleasant ride with this driver is a treat. He's doing 
the job he's paid to do and doing it exceptionally well." 

Walter Mack Jr. (North Avenue garage) pleased 
Mabel Hoffman, of Honolulu, with his courtesy as 
operator of a No. 76 Diversey bus. "The driver had al- 
ready closed the door of the bus, but generously re- 
opened it to let me on. Then a young blind man boarded 
the bus. After a time he asked the driver to let him off at 
Paulina. The driver told him we had already passed it. 
Then he let him off at the next stop, hailed a bus coming 
from the other direction, and helped him reach it. In Ha- 
waii, they believe they have the corner on the spirit of 
aloha (love). However, now I know it flourishes in 
Chicago, too." 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Honorees cited for 
response to crises 

Two bus operators, a rail service 
supervisor, and a Beverly garage clerk 
who took direct action to minimize in- 
jury to CTA riders, avoid property 
damage, or service delays in four sep- 
arate incidents have received special 
recognition on "A Day in CTA." 

The honorees are Marshall E. Boyd, 
bus operator, 77th Street garage; 
Dorothy Graham, bus operator. Bev- 
erly garage; Melvin Gardner, clerk at 
Beverly, and Robert L. Densmore, 
supervisor, North Rail District. 

Boyd earned kudos for stopping 
his southbound Michigan/Harrison bus 
when he observed his leader's slowly 
moving bus with no one at the steering 
wheel. The problem developed as the 
operator of the errant vehicle and a 
passenger were fighting. 

Operator Boyd caught up with the 
bus, boarded and brought it to a safe 
stop. Marshall notified the control cen- 
ter and requested medical aid for a 
woman who had injured her ankle 
when she jumped from the moving 
bus and fell to the pavement. 

Operator Graham, and Gardner, 
both of Beverly garage, combined their 
efforts to summon help for a motorist 
observed handcuffed to the steering 
wheel of her car and emergency flash- 
ers engaged. 




"Day in CTA " honorees (from left) Marshall Boyd, Robert L Densmore, Mrs. Dorothy Graham, 
and Melvin Gardner show off their certificates of special recognition. The four were treated to 
a tour of facilities at the Merchandise Mart, and met with CTA management. 



Ms. Graham approached the vehi- 
cle, parked about a half a block west of 
the Beverly garage, and heard the 
woman's cry for help. She notified 
Gardner, the clerk on duty at the time, 
who called police. The motorist who 
had been the victim of an armed rob- 
bery, was rescued within five minutes 
after police were notified. 

Rail supervisor Robert L. Densmore 
was honored for his unhesitating re- 
sponse during a service delay which 
was caused when the trolley pans of 



two Skokie Swift trains slipped from a 
broken span wire. Densmore. having 
already evacuated the train of its pas- 
sengers, called for the power to be cut. 
Once the power was off, he climbed 
atop each car, pulled down the trolley 
pans and secured the rope. 

When the power was restored, he 
controlled the trolley pans by holding 
the rope from atop the cars through 
the area of the damaged span wire 
thus minimizing the service delay as 
well as averting injury to CTA riders. 



Thanks for a job well donei 

Employees who have received commendations. 



Salim Abdul-Khaalig, Beverly 

Samuel Basile, 77th Street 
Rudolph Blakemore, North 
Avenue 

Jean Cage, North Park 
Jose Cancel, North Park 
Sergio Candelaria, Limits 
Carlotta Carter, 77th Street 
John Christner, Forest Glen 
Ethel Claiborne, 77th Street 
Charles Clayton, 77th Street 
Al Clayton, Archer 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
James Colles, Jefferson Park 
Georgia Cook, Archer 
Albert Croarkin, 77th Street 

Jesus Davila, Forest Glen 
Cora Davis, Forest Park 
Byron Dean, Beverly 
Angel DeLaPaz, Forest Glen 
Frederick Douglas, North Park 
John Durnell, Archer 



James Edwards, North Avenue 
Constantino Estrada, Archer 

Daniel Galarza, North Park 
Albert Garner, North Park 
Nathaniel George, 77th Street 
Corine Glaspie, West Section 
Anastacio Gonzalez Jr., 

Lawndale 
Allen Gordon, North Avenue 
Odell Granger, Forest Glen 

Willie Haynes, Forest Glen 
Ellie Head, 69th Street 
Henry Hinkle, North Park 

Zeke Jagst, North Park 
Willie James, North Park 
Ricca James, North Section 

Joe Kent, 77th Street 
John Kiszkan, Forest Park 

Robert Lay, Limits 
James Lewis, North Park 
Walter Lewis Jr., North Park 



Nazario Magana, North Park 
Christine McCord, North Section 
Sammy Miller, Forest Glen 
Florine Miller, West Section 
Edgar Mollinedo, North Park 
Fructuoso Moreno, Limits 
Raymond Mount, North Park 
Charles Murrell, Limits 

Moses Oliver, North Avenue 
Willie Otis, District B 

Drago Pancic, North Park 
Fanny Patton, Archer 
Frederick Pepke, Limits 
Larry Polk, 69th Street 
Alvin Polowczyk, Forest Glen 
Albert Powell, Ashland Terminal 

Patricia Rhoden, Ashland Terminal 
Alice Richman, North Park 
Johnny Riouse, 77th Street 
Toval Rolston, Forest Park 

Joseph Smith, Limits 
Alfred Smith, Douglas/Congress 
Ronald Stefinsky, North Park 
Zulema Stoyas, Forest Glen 



James Strickland, 69th Street 

Earl Terry, Forest Glen 
Sterling Tharp Jr., Limits 
Debra Thurbush, Jefferson Park 
Sidney Turner, Agent Dist. Office 

Allen Wade, 77th Street 
Lonnie Walker, North Park 
Thomas Walker, Limits 
William Walls, Archer 
Dorothy Walton, Limits 
Cleven Wardlow, Limits 
Arthur Watkins, 69th Street 
Maurice Watson, North Section 
Anthony Williams, Archer 
Otha Williams, Lawndale 
Willie Williams Jr., North Park 
Iona Williams, North Park 
Thester Winston, 69th Street 
Martha Woods, North Park 
John Wuest, Forest Glen 

Nikolaos Xifaras, North Park 

Anthony Zenner, North Park 
Joseph Zukerman, North Park 
John Zupko, Howard/Kimball 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 2 



13 



J. P. O'Connor retires after 37 years service 




John O'Connor (center), director of passenger controls and graphics, Operations Planning, is honored at a retirement party held at Marina Towers. 
More than 100 CTA employees, retirees, and friends attended. Sharing the table of honor with O'Connor are (from left) George Krambles, CTA ex- 
ecutive director, retired; O'Connor's sister, Ms. Alice O'Connor, his wife, Mrs. Lorraine O'Connor, and Harold Hirsch, manager, Operations Planning. 



John P. O'Connor, Director of 
Passenger Controls and Graphics in 
CTA Operations Planning retired Dec. 
31 after 37 years of service. 

O'Connor began working in the 
Staff Engineers Office of the former 
Chicago Surface Lines in 1946, just 
prior to the take-over by the Chicago 
Transit Authority. 

His entire career has been spent in 

Sam Girard retires 



research and planning with major 
studies including the conversion of the 
streetcar system to buses, improving 
the speed and operation of the rapid 
transit system, and general service 
planning of new bus and rapid transit 
routes and services. 

Additional duties included supervis- 
ing the preparation of passenger con- 
trols and fare collection plans, and all 



passenger information graphics. 

He was past chairman of the Fare 
Collection Task Force of the American 
Public Transit Association and a mem- 
ber of the Intermodal Facilities Plan- 
ning Committee of the Transportation 
Research Board. 

O'Connor is a resident of Westches- 
ter, IL. 



Adamowski retires 





More than 200 friends and co-workers of Sam Girard, 
chief clerk, Forest Glen garage, feted him at a retirement 
party December 28 in the garage. Girard ended his 37-year 
career in public transit on January 1, His fellow workers and 
friends gave Girard a cash gift and a special plaque honoring 
his career. On January 13 he was guest of honor at a dinner 
for 160 persons in a nearby banquet hall. Girard and his 
family plan to remain in their home in Schaumburg. 



Dan Perk (left), manager of Treasury, congratulates Edward 
Adamowski upon his retirement after 36 years of service 
with CTA and its predecessors. Prior to joining the Treasury 
Department where he was a bank ledger/bookkeeper, Ed 
worked in the Stores department. He began his CTA career 
as a bus cleaner at Limits garage. Adamowski and his wife, 
Mary Ann, who recently became grandparents, plan to 
spend their retirement in their Chicago home near their 
sons, Bob of CTA Central Counting, and Brian, a car repair- 
man at Rosemont. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Promotion 




Ollie Winston was promoted to assis- 
tant superintendent of controllers in the 
Control Center on January 2. He was 
formerly a power/rail supervisor in the 
Control Center. Winston, 38, joined 
CTA in 1967 and has been qualified in 
12 rail operations jobs on the rapid 
transit system. Before joining CTA, 
Winston served in the U.S. Navy in 
electronics and radio communications. 




Harry Horn, assistant control center su- 
perintendent, and his wife, Doreen, became 
grandparents for the first time on November 
21 when their daughter, Mrs. Amy Albarran, 
gave birth to Jason Michael Albarran in 
Ravenswood Hospital. The baby's father, 
Cyphano Albarran, operates a security guard 
service. 



Service anniversaries 
in February 

40 v — 

Herman Goldman, Forest Glen 
William Ruddle, North Avenue 
Richard Schneider, Bus Maint. 
William Taylor, Comm. /Power Cont. 

35 Years — i = 



Robert Crawford, Forest Park 

Americo DiGianfilippo, Wilson 

Willie Green, Bus Relief Area 

Burton Hill, General Maint 

Andrew Karkoska, Beverly 

Robert Lorentz, North Park 

Robert Loughran, Comm /Power Cont 

Langley Lykins, Rail Service 

George Millonas, Equip Engr. /Maint. 

Duane Reed Jr., Subst. Maint. 



30 Years 

George Booker, Comm /Power Cont 
Booker Byers, 77th Street 
Samuel Clark Jr., 69th Street 
James Dentley, 77th Street 
Vincent Ecter, 77th Street 
Magnus Edgar Jr., North Park 
William Harris. District C 
Richard Lane, Bus Instruction 
Timothy Mulvey, Beverly 
Irene Peterson, Res & Spec Proj 
Henry Sams, Limits 
Donald Schaeffer, Forest Glen 
Raphael Wilson, 77th Street 



25 Years = 

Frank Bailey, 77th Street 
Richard Brown, 77th Street 
Joseph Browne, General Maint 
John Gorman, Rail Dist North 
Joseph Hartl, Comm Design 
Thomas Mortell, Doug/Congress 
Donald Prendergast, Truck Shop 
Wade Simmons, North Avenue 



New Pensioners 

SOL BATTLE, Bus Service, 

Beverly. Emp. 5-17-48 
JOHN BROADNAX, Bus & Truck Mech-, 

South Shops. Emp 1-21-54 
PRESTAL CARNES. Bus Instructor. 

77th Street. Emp 1-28-54 
ERNEST CARTER. Bus Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp. 1-6-55 
RUFUS CLEVELAND, Conductor, 

Congress, Emp. 3-5-51 
K.C DAVISON, Motorman. 

South Section, Emp. 5-21-51 
WILLIAM FRANKLIN Sr., Bus Servicer, 

Beverly. Emp. 4-2-71 
WILLIE GUTHRIE, Instructor, 

69th Street. Emp. 8-31-53 
TOMIE JACKSON. Bus Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 1-21-54 
CLARENCE JUNKINS, Instructor. 

77th Street. Emp. 6-14-51 
HENRY KANIA, Bus & Truck Mech . 

South Shops. Emp. 9-17-52 
JOHN McGRAIL. Carpenter. 

South Shops. Emp. 1-27-45 
BARTHOLOMEW McGRATH, Motorman, 

South Section, Emp. 11-24-50 
MELVIN MITCHELL, Bus Operator. 

Lawndale, Emp. 1-18-54 
CAS1MIR NOGA. Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 10-8-47 
DENNIS O'LEARY. Laborer 

South Shops, Emp. 1-9-51 
RUBEN RAZOR. Traffic Checker. 

Schedules, Emp. 12-31-64 
ROBERT REES, Supervisor, 

Central District, Emp. 12-31-53 
CHARLES ROWELL. Bus Operator. 

Lawndale, Emp. 1-23-51 
JOSEPH SIEGAL. Superintendent, 

Power & Wiring. Emp 6-26-46 
ANN SLOAN. Stores Acctg Cont Clk., 

Financial Services, Emp. 10-26-53 
■JAMES STRONG, Rail Janitor. 

Madison/ Wabash. Emp. 7-18-55 
JOHN TYK. File Clerk. 

Personnel Adm /Job Class . Emp 1-21-48 
GENEVIEVE WRIGHT, Bill Clerk, IV, 

Financial Services, Emp. 3-9-50 

'Retroactive to 1-1-84 



Disability Retirements 

LOIS DODDS. Bus Operator. 

Archer. Emp 12-9-74 
WILLIAM McNALLY. Ticket Agent. 

West Section, Emp 4-1-57 
RALPH SULLIVAN. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 5-6-67 



iisr tsa^ztsaortj^tml 



CHARLES BACKSTROM, 90. West Section, 

Emp 9-21-43, Died 12-12-83 
HENRY BOSSE, 88, 69th Street, 

Emp 6-21-29, Died 12-83 
JETHRO BRIGHT. 62, 77th Street. 

Emp 10-4-45. Died 12-11-83 
MICHAEL BURKE. 81. 69th Street 

Emp. 2-27-28. Died 12 16-83 
FRANK CASTIGLIONE. 84. South Shops. 

Emp 11-23-37. Died 12-13-83 
JERRY CHADW1CK, 79. Engineering. 

Emp. 1-13-48. Died 12-7-83 
NEIL COTTER. 75. South Shops, 

Emp 8-30-29. Died 12-13-83 
JULIA CURRY. 87. West Section. 

Emp 11-24-40. Died 12-8-83 
HENRY DeMANUELE. 57. Beverly, 

Emp. 1-19-61. Died 12-24-83 
DAVID DULFER. 71. 69th Street. 

Emp. 4-27-37. Died 12-2-83 
HERBERT EICHTEN, 80. West Section. 

Emp. 11-13-29, Died 12-5-83 
THOMAS FAHY. 84, 77th Street 

Emp. 9-25-23. Died 12-22-83 
ARTHUR FRANK, 75, Utility, 

Emp. 6-7-38. Died 12-11-83 
RAYMOND GUNTHER, 75. Schedule/Traff ., 

Emp. 8-30-43, Died 12-19-83 
HENRY HARPER, 81, West Section, 

Emp. 1-13-45. Died 12-17-83 
MAX HAWKINS. 92, 77th Street, 

Emp. 3-21-16. Died 12-7-83 
CLEVELAND HOSCH. 70. 52nd Street. 

Emp. 1-16-51. Died 12-8-83 
ALLEN JACKSON JR.. 56. Limits. 

Emp. 11-28-52, Died 12-8-83 
ARTHUR KAESTNER, 73. Kedzie. 

Emp. 9-12-42. Died 12-12-83 
JOHN KEPHART, 63, North Park. 

Emp. 12-22-75, Died 12-23-83 
EDWARD KRUMLAND, 89. North Section, 

Emp. 2-28-17. Died 12-31-83 
WILLIAM KUGELBERG, 75. Keeler. 

Emp. 9-2-42. Died 12-29-83 
GEORGE KUNDRAT. 68. Archer. 

Emp. 11-11-70. Died 12-21-83 
JOHN MILAS. 66. Vehicle Maint.. 

Emp. 7-12-39, Died 12-20-83 
BERNARD MULVANEY, 78. Howard. 

Emp. 2-14-27. Died 12-28-83 
CHARLES NOREK, 76. West Section. 

Emp. 1-25-51. Died 12-27-83 
ROBERT O'BRIEN, 69, Real Estate. 

Emp. 3-10-75. Died 12-18-83 
WILLIAM O'BRIEN. 67, Beverly. 

Emp. 7-19-48. Died 12-12-83 
PETER REMY. 78. 77th Street. 

Emp. 9-21-26, Died 12-17-83 
JOHN REZNICEK. 85. South Shops. 

Emp. 4-10-45. Died 12-6-83 
ROBERT TIDSTAND. 88. Way & Structs , 

Emp 1925, Died 12-24-83 
WILLIAM WEBSTER. 88. West Section. 

Emp. 5-12-20, Died 12-17-83 



7984 Vol. 37-No. 2 



15 



ZS EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 

\fo<met\y Employee Coomelmg P«og'om| 

Purpose" 
To find solutions for problems 

"Goal" 
Keep people working 



ALCOHOLISM 

DRUGS 

FINANCIAL 




LEGAL 
i MARITAL 
• EMOTIONAL 



eta Employees or family members 
or significant others 



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CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

\rblume37 Number 2 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Department, 
Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 

Editor: Rick Willis 

Graphic Designer: Alexandra Eiva 

Contributing Writers: Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 

Typesetting and printing provided by the Management 
Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired CTA 
employees. Annual subscription price to others, $5. CTA 
TRANSIT NEWS. Room 734, Merchandise Mart Plaza, 
P.O. Box 3555. Chicago, Illinois 60654. 



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84 Volume 37-Number 3 

Transit News 




,,v-~ 



/ 



9. 



!■«■■■■■■■■ 



Cleven Wardlow demonstrates the proper grip of the wheel which he had for the 
"Happy Bus" during an informal gathering at Limits Garage which co-workers spon- 
sored in honor of Wardlow's retirement. 



Wardlow, 
'Happy Bus' driver, 
retires after 31 years 

Good morning and welcome to 
the Happy Bus," has been 
Cleven Wardlow's greeting to riders 
for 31 years. The "Happy Bus" driver, 
who has rolled out the red carpet for 
CTA patrons on the Clark, Broadway, 
and Streeterville routes, retires March 1. 

Elonzo Hill, director, Train- 
ing/Instruction, credits Wardlow with 
getting more free publicity for CTA 
than any other employee in the 
Authority's history. "There will never 
be another like him," said Hill as he 
recalled the many commendations 
earned by Wardlow from the riding 
public. Besides his public image, he is 
well respected by his co-workers, and 
he has earned the affectionate title of 
the "Happy Bus" driver from co- 
workers and patrons alike. 

Wardlow is a humble, yet tough and 
God-fearing man who uses every op- 
portunity to praise God and spread 
cheer daily to his riders and everyone 
else that he meets unlike any other. 
Now he looks forward to doffing the 
CTA blue-grey uniform of a bus 
operator and donning the more 
somber garb of cleric. He will assume 
the role of assistant to his pastor. 
Bishop Isiah Leon Roberts of Roberts 
Temple Church of God in Christ. 

Already an ordained elder, 
Wardlow will be very active in the "All 
Night Tarry Service" after his retire- 
ment from CTA. "I will be working all 
over the city, but mostly I will be work- 
ing with folks in the all-night prayer 
service at the church," said Wardlow. 

"1 have had some wonderful times 

working for CTA. I came here as a sin- 

(continued on page 2) 



Wardlow, 'Happy Bus' driver.., 




eleven Wardlow displays the "Happy Miracle Bus" sign, his trademark for years which 
advertised the unique service he ottered CTA riders on the routes he traveled. 



(continued from page 1) 

ner, but I leave as a saint (one commit- 
ted to the work of God), and I'm 
grateful for that. The Lord wanted me 
to leave this job in 1983, but I asked 
Him to let me stay until this year 
because there were some things I 
wanted to do, including a chance to 
participate in the Bus Roadeo," he 
said. 

Wardlow tied for fourth place in the 
1983 Bus Roadeo and received a 
trophy and a $100 savings bond. "The 
Lord consented for me to stay through 
last year, but now I must leave," said 
the smiling, ever-pleasant Wardlow. 

The 60-year-old Wardlow is a father 
of six sons, and two daughters, and 
the grandfather of 19. Like himself, 
two of his sons, Darold and Wayne, 
are bus operators; Riccardo is a con- 
ductor, Ronald a ticket agent, and 
Cleven Jr. is a switchman. Cleven Jr. 
is also an assistant pastor at Roberts 
Temple where all of the Wardlow 
family worship. 

Wardlow Sr. says he will miss his 
CTA flock who over the years have 
heard him witness the glory of God. 
Wardlow begins each day at 3 a.m. 
with prayer, then drives from his near 
west side home to Limits Garage. His 
personal equipment for the day's 
journey includes an old tattered Bible, 
a song book, and sheet music which 
he spreads across the dashboard of his 
bus. In the windshield is a plastic sign 



which reads, "The Happy Miracle 
Bus." 

Recalling the greatest Christmas gift 
of his life, Wardlow remembers a day 
during the Christmas season many 
years ago when a young man boarded 
his No. 156-LaSalle bus and told him 
that it had been his intention to com- 
mit suicide, but when he heard 
Wardlow talking about the goodness 
of God, and what God had done for 
him, he changed his mind. "That was 
the greatest gift that anyone could 
have given me," said Wardlow, beam- 
ing as he reminisced. 

In his 31 years and seven months of 




service, Wardlow has driven more 
than two million miles without a 
chargeable accident. He has par- 
ticipated in the Bus Roadeo since its 
inception two years ago, and has been 
a leader in the Employee Safety Per- 
formance Program (ESPP). 

A man with a good word for 
everybody, he has been commended 
continuously by the riding public, and 
honored in the media. "John Justin 
Smith, and Jerry Harper of CBS were 
among the first reporters to ride and 
report on the 'Happy Bus'," said 
Wardlow. Recently he appeared on 
the Phil Donahue Show where he and 
other public service employees in- 
cluding CTA conductor John 
Cameron were given special recogni- 
tion for their unique public service 
philosophy, gentle nature, yet mental 
toughness. Wardlow started his CTA 
career at Kedzie Garage with the per- 




A grateful rider thanks Wardlow for his 
"red carpet" hospitality service over the 
many months she was among his riders 
on the 157-Streeterville route. 



Edward Schwamb, superintendent, Limits 
Garage, bids farewell to "An outstanding 
employee who will be missed. " 

sonal motto, "I'm rolling out the Red 
Carpet because this is a hospitality ser- 
vice." 

"Cleven Wardlow is a lovely per- 
son. We will miss him for sure," said 
Harry Reddrick, manager of Transpor- 
tation. 

Edward Schwamb, superintendent 
at Limits Garage where Wardlow is 
assigned, said, "Guys like this I'd like 
all day. He's a real conscientious guy; 
one who has the nack and tendency to 
motivate other employees to do a 
good job. He is an outstanding 
employee. As an ESPP team captain, 
he always had a few nice things to say. 
We're going to miss him." 

Said Wardlow, "It has been a bless- 
ing." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



From the Chairman 



Interagency Interaction 



The enormous task of providing convenient, safe, 
and efficient public transportation for our riders re- 
quires continuous cooperation between CTA and 
many governmental, business, and neighborhood 
organizations throughout the City of Chicago and 
nearby suburbs. The Mayor's Traffic Management 
Task Force (featured on page 8), wherein several 
agencies exchange information and adjust their ac- 
tivities to help commuters cope with day to day traffic 
problems, is just one fine example of this creative in- 
teraction. 

As the center of transportation in the Chicago area, 
CTA is working with the Regional Transportation 
Authority to provide comprehensive regional transit 
service that reduces duplication of service and offers 
riders the convenience and economy of universal 
transfers and monthly passes. The new monthly Link- 
Up Pass, which enables railroad commuters to pur- 
chase passes specifically for bus rides to and from 
commuter railroad stations, is the latest CTA-RTA 
cooperative improvement. 

Our service planning and scheduling activities also 
benefit from interagency interaction, because informa- 
tion received from civic, business, and neighborhood 
organizations helps us determine how we can most ef- 
fectively and efficiently serve our riders. Major service 
and facility expansions, like the O'Hare Extension, are 
developed through cooperative efforts that also in- 
clude the City of Chicago, Department of Public 
Works, and various planning and funding organiza- 
tions on federal, state, and local levels. 

Cooperation with the Chicago Police and Fire 
departments, as well as those of suburbs served by 
CTA, results in a safe transit environment and in- 
creased rider confidence. To enable these heroic 
public servants to perform their jobs most efficiently, 
CTA cooperates with them in their daily activities and 
offers training programs that enable them to practice 
emergency procedures on our system and understand 
transit operating limitations. 

All CTA employees must realize that interagency 
cooperation improves the quality of our transit service. 
By working with other agencies, we can continue the 
tradition of excellent transit service in the Chicago 
area. 




Striving for excellence 
testimonial is planned 

The Transportation department will honor more than 
1,000 CTA employees at a testimonial dinner and evening 
of entertainment this spring in recognition of sustained 
superior performance during the 1983 calendar year. 

Harry Reddrick, deputy executive director. Operations, 
said a "Striving for Excellence" testimonial is planned for 
May 12 at McCormick Place. Employees recognized during 
the past year in the Employee Safety Performance Program. 
Million Mile club honorees, and employees honored for 
their courtesy to riders will be the recipients of special 
recognition unlike anything they have already received. 

Other special guests of honor will include employees with 
records of excellence, members of the 1983 Bus Roadeo 
Winning Circle 20 and Third Rail Roundup Roundhouse 
18, A Day in CTA honorees, and Superior Public Service 
Award winners and finalists. 

In the past 18 months the Transportation department has 
implemented and conducted a variety of activities designed 
to motivate employees and provide incentives for improved 
performance. 

Reddrick said activities such as the Bus Roadeo, Third 
Rail Roundup, and the Employee Safety Performance Pro- 
gram have positively impacted performance in the 
Transportation department and resulted in improved service 
to the riding public as well as reduced costs. 

According to Transportation department figures, since 
these programs were implemented , CTA has realized reduc- 
tions in injury-on-duty claims, absences due to illness, re- 
quested time off, percentage of employees assigned to the 
extra board, and passenger complaints. The department's 
calculations indicate that CTA experienced 500 fewer 
passenger and traffic accidents in 1983 than in 1982, CTA's 
previous safest year. 

Reddrick noted that morale among Transportation 
department employees appears to be at its highest level in 
recent memory and continues to build through skills-related 
competition, meaningful challenge, and recognition from 
management. 

"Our operating employees are showing a renewed sense 
of professionalism, in performing their duties," said Red- 
drick. "Pride in themselves, their jobs, and their employer 
have increased. They have also related the department's 
goals to job satisfaction and personal objectives," he added. 

Calling it vital that the Transportation department rein- 
force the momentum its incentive programs have 
generated, Reddrick said the "Striving for Excellence" 
testimonial is being planned as an annual event. 

An annual testimonial honoring Transportation personnel 
for sustained superior performance would spotlight in- 
dividual achievements of Transportation's various incentive 
activities Authority-wide,instead of limiting recognition to a 
comparison of others in the same job classification. It would 
also focus the attention of CTA riders and the general public 
on the accomplishments of CTA employees. 

Meanwhile, Training/Instruction personnel are develop- 
ing a competition for ticket agents modeled after the Bus 
Roadeo and Third Rail Roundup concepts. Plans call for the 
new competition to be implemented this summer, according 
to Elonzo Hill, director, Training/Instruction. 



7984 Vol. 37-No. 3 



Commendation Corner 



Carmelo Morales (Forest Glen 
garage) was praised by Maria 
Gonzalez, of Moffat Street, for 
his handling of an emergency 
on a No 78 Montrose bus. "At 
Oak Park Avenue, we realized 
the rear tire of the bus was on 
fire. The driver managed 
without panic or hesitation to 
unload the passengers safely. 
He even carried my two 
children off to safety. Then he 
drove the bus about a block 
away, stopping traffic to help 
everyone avoid the hazard. He 
then started bravely to ex- 
tinguish the fire before it got 
out of hand. I feel he should 
be commended for the fine 
job he did." 




Josefa Garcia (Limits garage) was thanked by Judy 
Pelet, of Lincoln Park West, for warning her about a purse 
snatcher while operating a No. 151 Sheridan bus. "I was 
getting on the bus when an individual who had just gotten 
off tried to get into my purse and steal my wallet. She was 
so alert, brave and concerned. She started to warn me and 
really startled him off. 1 was so pleased not to have my 
purse stolen. There is a good feeling knowing that people 
are concerned. Your employee is a very concerned citizen, 
and you can be proud of her." 

Charles Young (West Section) was the conductor on a 
Congress-Douglas-Milwaukee train ridden by J.L. Fabian, 
of Des Plaines. "This man conducts himself in a manner 
that makes one think back to when people took pride in 
their jobs. He is pleasant, courteous, knowledgeable, and 
makes sure he can be understood. He calls all stops, 
transfer points, connecting streets with their numbers, and 
even the correct time and date. To top this off, he even 
thanks the folks for riding the CTA. This fellow is a joy to 
riders, and a real godsend to anyone not familiar with the 
city." 

Oscar Smith Jr. (North Avenue garage) was commend- 
ed be Jackie Galis, of Berwyn, who was a rider on his No. 
126 Jackson bus. "The bus was very crowded. A 
gentleman boarded and said a cheery 'Good morning' to 
the driver, and he responded equally cheerfully, even 
though there were people practically in his lap. At a corner 
a lady asked him the way to a certain place. He told her 
she couldn't get there from where she was, but to get on 
the bus so she could get to a place where she could catch 
the proper bus. I was very impressed. This man was 
courteous beyond the call of duty." 



Earlean Raynor (Archer 
garage) was admired by Mary 
Nauss, of West 71st Street, 
for "her caring concern" as 
operator of a No 94 South 
California bus. "She urges 
people to use care in entering 
her bus. When they depart, 
she tells them to exit 
cautiously. She admonishes 
young mothers to seat their 
children, not to let them stand 
on the seats. She waits pa- 
tiently for the sick and infirm 
to board at Holy Cross 
Hospital. She also waits 
momentarily at intersections 
for approaching buses to see 
if they have transferring riders 
for her bus. She is a real 
'diamond.' " 



Robert Huff (69th Street garage) was applauded by 
Elenore Knaus, of Rice Street, for his courtesy to riders on 
a No. 49 Western bus. "As I got close to the stop, I saw the 
bus coming. I started to go real fast to try to catch it. The 
driver noticed me and slowed down so I could board. It 
was a miserable Sunday afternoon. When we hit Belmont 
Avenue, he waited for people getting off the Belmont bus 
to cross the street to board his bus. All along, it was the 
same thing. It was nice to see a driver think about his 
passengers. He is doing a good job. I hope he keeps it up." 

Tom Collins (Archer garage) was the operator of a No. 
129 Northwestern /Franklin bus ridden by Linda Rudolph, 
a jury administrator at the Federal Center. "He has con- 
sistently been the most courteous and helpful driver I have 
ever had the pleasure of riding with. He always has a 
friendly greeting, and he is extremely helpful in providing 
information. Mr. Collins will always take one or two extra 
seconds to advise inquiring riders of the proper bus to take, 
and always leaves them with a good feeling toward the 
CTA. He exemplifies the highest standard of profes- 
sionalism." 

Edwin LaBoy (North Avenue garage) was appreciated by 
Lorraine Dolutowski, of North Washtenaw Avenue, for his 
alertness as operator of a No. 77 Belmont bus. "I felt this 
tug on my purse. I looked and saw it was open, and my 
wallet was gone. I realized that the man standing close to 
me had moved to the center of the bus. I knew he had 
snatched my wallet. I grabbed him and told him I wanted it 
back. Fortunately, the driver came to my rescue and 
retrieved my wallet from the thief. He then called the 
police and held the man till they came. Please thank the 
driver again for me, as I had to leave with the police to sign 
a complaint." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Day in CTA honors 
agent, clerk, terminal 
yard teamwork 

An armed robbery was averted by a 
cool and calm ticket agent who told 
the would-be robber she had no 
money when he demanded that she 
hand it all over. 

Inez Lugo, assigned to the Kimball 
station, said the man, claiming to have 
a gun, approached her and an- 
nounced a hold up. When she insisted 
that she had no money, the man told 
her to call police which she did. Of- 
ficers took him into custody and charg- 
ed the man with attempted armed rob- 
bery. 

Ms. Lugo, meanwhile, received 
CTA's special recognition on "A Day 
in CTA" for the manner in which she 
handled the situation. Three other 
Day in CTA honorees were also 
recognized for their teamwork during 
an afternoon derailment which oc- 
curred in the Howard terminal yard. 

They are Leroy Albert, supervisor, 
North Rail District; Edward Cook, 
yard foreman, Howard terminal; and 
Richard Dobbey, towerman, Howard 
terminal yard. 

Terminal officials said as a result of 




Leroy Albert, Inez Lugo, Richard Dobbey, and Edward Cook (from left), "A Day in CTA" 
honorees, proudly display the certificates of appreciation which they were presented during 
their visit with CTA management at the Merchandise Mart. 



the derailment, both lead tracks were 
blocked, entrance to the Loop track 
was also blocked, and cars intended 
for North-South service were trapped. 
The situation was first observed by 
Cook, the yard foreman, who notified 
the control center and the north rail 
district. Through communication and 
a concerted effort between the super- 
visor, yard foreman and towerman, 



only a seven minute delay was ex- 
perienced on the Main line, and no 
delay occurred on the Evanston and 
Skokie service. 

Robert Desvignes, director, Ad- 
ministration and Performance Con- 
trol, said due to the initiative and at- 
tention to^duty exercised by the three 
men, a potentially grave situation was 
relegated to a minor inconvenience. 



Thanks for a job well done 

Employees who have received commendations. 



Mohammed Ajami, North Park 
Clarence Atkins III, 77th Street 

Carmen Betances, North Park 
George Bowen Jr., North 

Avenue 
Charles Boxley, North Park 
Richard Brown Jr., Archer 
L.E. Brown Jr., North Park 
Moses Buie, Lawndale 
Philip Buscemi, Howard/ 

Kimball 
Virgel Butler, Beverly 

Jean Cage, North Park 
Charlie Caldwell. 69th Street 
Edith Carr, Forest Glen 
Carlotta Carter, 77th Street 
Robert Charney, Forest Glen 
James Clark, 77th Street 
Leslie Clemons, 69th Street 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
James Cockrell, Limits 
Earle Cooke, 77th Street 
Marco Cordova, Howard/ 
Kimball 

Lawrence Davis Jr., Rail Dist 

North 
Harper Donahue Jr., 77th Street 



William Donohue, 77th Street 
Lachester Drain, Limits 
Herman Duffin, Forest Glen 
Charles Durham, North Avenue 

Ophelia Ellis, 77th Street 

Roosevelt Fleet, North Park 
Reginald Freeman, Rail 

Instruction 
Harold Freiwald, Beverly 

Daniel Garcia, Archer 
Gonzalo Garcia, North Park 
Allen Gordon, North Avenue 
Joe Griffith, Beverly 

Bertrand Hall, 77th Street 
Billy Hall, Archer 
August Hallmann, Forest Glen 
Felix Hernandez, North Avenue 
Rosemary Hoskins, North Park 

R. Jackson, North Avenue 
William James, North Park 
Waymon Jeffrey, Beverly 
Floyd Jennings, 77th Street 
John Jimenez, North Park 
Daniel Joseph, Forest Glen 



Martin Kane, Howard/ Kimball 
Joe Kent, 77th Street 

Minnie Latimore, North Avenue 
Walter Lewis Jr., North Park 
Joseph Lima, Forest Glen 

Leslie Malinger, Forest Glen 
Israel Martinez, Forest Glen 
Jesse Mayfield, North Avenue 
Calvin McCants, 69th Street 
Phyllis McCoy, Forest Glen 
Cordell McWorter, North 

Avenue 
Willie Moore, North Avenue 
Thomas Morrison, North Park 
Anthony Myers, 77th Street 

Amador Olavarria, Forest Glen 

Frederick Pepke, Limits 
Jorge Perez, North Park 
Michael Powell, Howard/ 

Kimball 
Harry Purnell. 69th Street 

John Reid, West Section 
Johnny Riouse, 77th Street 
Andrew Robinson, Howard 
/Kimball 



Keith Rosche, Forest Glen 

Juan Saucedo, WestSection 
Cassandra Seay, Limits 
Elmer Shoemate, Archer 
Ronald Singleton, Beverly 
Charles Staples. 69th Street 
Carl Suddeth. North Park 

Kent Thomas, 77th Street 
Lenora Thomas, North Avenue 
Lynval Thompson, Limits 
Blanca Torres, Forest Glen 
David Tucker, North Avenue 

Sergio Villanueva, North Park 

Cleven Wardlow, Limits 
Arthur Watkins. 69th Street 
Gail Williams, 77th Street 
Welborn Williams, Forest Glen 
Parmela Willis, Archer 
Leroy Wilson Jr.. 77th Street 

Willie Young, 77th Street 
Fred Young, North Park 

Joseph Zukerman, North Park 
John Zupko, Howard/ 
Kimball 



7984 Vol. 37-No. 3 



Stores section 
names '83 employee 
of the year 



The development of incentive pro- 
grams designed to stimulate employee 
performance are unlimited, and CTA 
employees in other areas besides 
Transportation are also enjoying the 
benefits as evidenced by the Materials 
Management department. 

Jack A. Lira, warehouse worker I, 
Stores section, Materials Manage- 
ment, was named the 1983 Employee 
of the Year in the most recent 
employee performance incentive pro- 
gram developed last year by Materials 
Management. 

William Roman, director of Stores, 
and Edward Tobin, manager, 
Materials Management/Purchasing 
Agent, said that the new program is 
designed to give recognition to the 
most deserving employee in the Stores 
area. CTA storerooms are located at 
Skokie Shop, West Shops, 77th 
Street, 63rd Street Lower Yards, 
Washington Street Garage, and the 
Merchandise Mart. 

Roman said criteria for selection in- 
cluded the employee's work record, 
any corrective action, volunteer work, 
and community involvement. The in- 
dividual's supervisor was also required 
to write a narrative regard- 
ing the individual being considered. 

The Employee of the Year program 
assesses workers in the Stores area 
from January to December. The pro- 
gram was developed with special input 
by James Riley, Materials Manage- 
ment unit supervisor, John Gill, super- 
visor, 63rd Street Lower Yards, and 
Bob McCarthy, Procurement. 

Runners-up in the 1983 competi- 
tion were Dorothy Doljanin, Stores 
West, Andrew Cunningham, Store- 
room 61, and Dalton Gilliland, Stores 
South. 





i. s 






Jack A. Lira (left) and Dorothy Doljanin show off their plaques awarded for Employee of 
the Year and runner-up, respectively. Sharing the moment with them is William Roman, 
director of Stores, Materials Management. 




Your Social Security 

Several recent changes in Social 
Security were effective in January 
1984. You should be aware of what 
they are: 

Benefit increase - If you receive 
Social Security or supplemental 
security income (SSI) benefits, your 
monthly payments increased 3.5 per- 
cent effective with the January check. 
The maximum Social Security retire- 
ment benefit generally payable is now 
$734 a month for a person 65 in 
1983. And the maximum Federal SSI 
payment is $314 for an individual and 
$472 for a couple. 

Payroll tax increase - If you are 
an employee, the Social Security tax 
rate you pay this year will be the same 
as in 1983--6.7 percent, even though 
your employer will pay 7 percent. This 
is because of a one-time 0.3 percent 
tax credit you will get. 

Self -employment tax increase- 
If you are self-employed, your Social 
Security tax rate for 1984 will be 100 
percent of the combined employee- 
employer rate (14 percent), rather 
than at a rate that was roughly 70 per- 
cent of the total. But you will receive a 
self-employment tax credit of 2.7 per- 
cent of your self-employment income 
for 1984 (as well as a 2.3 percent 
credit for 1985, and a 2.0 percent 
credit for 1986-89). 



Coverage for Federal and non- 
profit organization employees - If 

you are newly hired by the Federal 
Government in 1984 or later, or if you 
work for a nonprofit organization, you 
are covered be Social Security. And if 
you are a nonprofit employee 55 or 
older first covered in 1984, you will 
need fewer work credits than normal 
to be insured for retirement or sur- 
vivors benefits. 

Improvements for disabled 
widow(er)s - If you are a disabled 
widow or widower who started getting 
checks on your deceased spouse's 
Social Security record before age 60, 
your payments may be slightly in- 
creased in January (in addition to the 
regular benefit increase). And if you 
remarry, your benefits can continue. 
(This provision also applies to di- 
vorced surviving spouses.) 

Taxation of benefits • If you get 
Social Security benefits and have 
substantial other income in addition to 
your benefits, up to one-half of the 
benefits may be subject to Federal in- 
come tax starting with 1984. Only 
about one in 10 people are affected by 
this provision. 

For more information about these 
changes, contact any Social Security 
office. If you need more specific 
guidance concerning possible taxation 
of benefits, get in touch with the Inter- 
nal Revenue Service. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli addresses a weekly meeting of the Mayor's Traffic Manage- 
ment Task Force held in the CTA Board room. Task Force members shown are (left to right) 
Frank Barker, director, Street Traffic; Harold Hirsch, manager, Operations Planning; Police 
Commander Howard Patinkin; Mark Wozny, City of Chicago Department of Public Works, and 
Task Force Chairman John LaPlante (Dept. of Public Works). 




Members of the Mayor's Traffic Management Task Force listen intently as Lester Racker, area 
superintendent, Control Center, describes the train operations flow chart which monitors the 
exact location of all trains operating on the system. 




CTA Planner Lena Phillips distributes maps and other informational material as she conducts a 
traffic signal test for Chicago Area Transportation Study. The test was in connection with the 
Mayor's Traffic Management Task Force. 

8 



It has been said that a city which is 
not constantly rebuilding itself is a 
dying city. In recent years Chicago has 
undergone as unprecedented amount 
of new construction, particularly in the 
downtown central business district. 
The result of this building "boom" has 
been an increase in the size of the 
work force and good news on the 
economic scene. 

However, with all the good news, 
there is, unfortunately, some bad. The 
bad news comes in the form of 
massive traffic slow-downs, tie-ups, 
and general disruption of mass transit 
service. The result is confusion, ag- 
gravation, and the apparent lack of 
concern help to the commuter 
negotiate the new and ever-changing 
(almost daily) traffic patterns. 

In response to this dramatic rise in 
traffic congestion, the city's Depart- 
ment of Public Works prepared a 
"Loop Traffic Management Study" in 
spring of 1982. The study was an 
analysis of Loop traffic issues prepared 
by a committee including represen- 
tatives of the Illinois Department of 
Transportation, the city's departments 
of Streets & Sanitation, Public Works, 
Police, Fire, and CTA. A number ofj 
business groups and organizations 
were also included. 

One of the study recommendations 
was the creation of the Loop Traffic 
Management Task Force. This Taskii] 
Force was responsible for an on-going 
review of major traffic man- 
agement issues, as well as the 
developement of specific solutions to 
on-going traffic problems. 

Now titled the Mayor's Traffic 
Management Task Force, the group 
has met every week since June 17, 
1982. The Task Force publishes a 

CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




weekly updated advisory which details 
construction, potential traffic "bottle- 
necks," and a listing of upcoming 
special events which may necessitate 

i changes in transit and traffic patterns. 
"This task force, as far as we know, 
is the only one of its kind in the coun- 
try," said Frank Barker, CTA's direc- 
tor of Street Traffic. "When you com- 
bine the resources of major city 
departments, state agencies and the 
private sector, the mass transit riding 
public reaps the benefits. 

"Our supervisors, drivers, and con- 
trol operations have advance warning 
of street closures, detours, etc. The 
key is advance planning-the Mayor's 
Traffic Management Task Force gives 

I the CTA the edge necessary to pro- 
vide fast, efficient transportation 

I around construction areas," Barker 

Isaid. 
The Mayor's Traffic Management 
[Task Force publishes a "Weekly 
Bulletin" which includes a list of items 
affecting traffic; special advisories 
noting alternative routes; seasonal 
reminders such as "Winter Parking 
Regulations"; and a map of downtown 
identifying construction zones and 
5treet closures. 

Barker said that one of the most im- 
portant services provided by the Traf- 
fic Management Task Force is a traffic 
telephone "Hotline." Barker said, "In- 
formation on construction projects and 
special events is available on a special 
Hotline' 24 hours a day. Dial S-T-R- 
E-E-T-S (787-3387)." 

So the next time construction 

'snarls" traffic and you wish "someone 

(vould do something about it!", the 

Mayor's Traffic Management Task 

f-orce and the CTA are working on it. 

1984 Vol. 37-No. 3 



Pausing during a recent tour of the CTA 's Control Center is the Chairman of the Mayor's Traffic 
Management Task Force, John LaPlante (second from right). Joining LaPlante from CTA are 
(left to right) Michael LaVelle, director of Service; Jim Blaa. administrative assistant to the ex- 
ecutive director; Lou Dixon, area superintendent, Bus; Lester Racker, area superintendent Con- 
trol Center, and Frank Barker, director, Street Traffic. 




Power Controller John Nimtz describes the power section of the CTA Control Center to the 
Mayor's Traffic Management Task Force. The Task Force toured the Control Center before a 
weekly meeting held at the CTA. 




Mrs. Carol Goodman and her sons are attracted by the minibus which was on display in the 
Mayor's Traffic Management Task Force exhibit at the Chicago Auto Show courtesy of Bus 
Maintenance and Utility departments. 

9 



Isaac Beal 
Co-chairs 
SF Review 



Isaac Beal, CTA superintendent of 
Special Services, has returned from 
San Francisco where he was co- 
chairman of a Special Services peer 
group review. 

Beal, and Mrs. Carol Weinstein, 
superintendent. Special Services, 
Oakland, shared responsibilities as co- 
chairmen of the group which also had 
representatives from transit properties 
in Seattle, Portland, and Denver. All 
five cities provide special services 
transportation for elderly and han- 
dicapped riders. 

The five-day San Francisco training 
session was held to educate MUNI 
personnel on special services as San 
Francisco considers offering a similar 
service. Beal said members of the 
group discussed their experiences in 
the various areas of special services 
with MUNI personnel. He said the 
Municipal Railway has ordered 280 
lift-equipped Flyer buses similar to 
vehicles used by CTA, but plan to 
operate them over fixed routes. 

"The matters for discussion which 
included policy, sensitivity, safety, 
record keeping, and the selection pro- 
cess of operators and other personnel 
for a special services program were 
very important matters in which MUNI 
felt they needed our input," said Beal. 

Participants in the discussions in- 
cluded local politicians, MUNI 
management and departments con- 
cerned, union representatives, the ad- 
visory board for the disabled com- 
munity, and operator representatives, 
Beal said. 

Beal, who served on the peer group 
review under the auspices of CTA, 
was invited to participate by MUNI 
general manager and former CTA 
general operations manager Harold 
Geissenheimer.'Tm especially grateful 
to CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli, 
Executive Director Bernard Ford, and 
his assistant, James Blaa, for the sup- 



/'" 






m 




port they extended which enabled me 
to be a part of this peer group review," 
Beal said. 

"We believe that CTA Special Ser- 
vices is the best in the business," the 
superintendent said. "We have the 
best operators, and we provide more 
service for people. We have arrived at 
this conclusion as a result of our en- 
counter with people from other transit 
properties across the nation who also 
offer special services for the elderly 
and handicapped in their respective 
municipalities. 

"CTA's Special Services program 
provides transportation for a wide base 
of people. We are moving more than 
12,325 people per month, a far cry 
from the 2,000 people a month with 
which we started this service. 

"We operate 42 buses over 32 runs 
daily in Chicago's peak hours, pro- 
viding a lot of service to people who 
have no other means of transporta- 
tion. Thus, we believe we're far ahead 
of many other municipalities operating 
more special services buses than CTA, 
because we put more miles on our 
special services buses than we do the 
buses in our regular service. 

"We believe it is because of our ser- 
vice to the elderly and handicapped 



that other municipalities ask us to par- 
ticipate in such groups as this one in 
San Francisco, sharing information 
which might help them establish a like 
service. 

"I'm well aware of how helpful a 
peer group review can be. Groups 
such as this were very instrumental in 
helping CTA establish its Special Ser- 
vices program. Thus, I'm very happy 
to participate in a peer group review. I 
feel as though I'm returning a favor," 
Beal concluded. 



First subway 
elevator opens 



CTA's first elevator complex, which 
will enable mobility-limited riders to 
travel between street level and subway 
level, was opened Dec. 21 at Quincy 
street and the State Street Transit 
Mall. 

This elevator complex takes dis- 
abled riders down from the street level 
to the Adams-Jackson mezzanine. 
There, disabled riders pay their fares 
to the ticket agent who opens a special 
gate for entrance to a second elevator. 
This takes disabled riders down to the 
State street subway on the Howard- 
Englewood-Jackson Park 'L'-subway 
rapid transit route. 

The special elevator complex is in 
operation 24 hours a day, every day. 

Because of the location of the plat- 
form doors on the Adams-Jackson 
subway platform, north and south- 
bound trains had their berthing areas 
moved closer to the elevator for han- 
dicapped riders boarding or alighting 
trains. 

This elevator complex for use by 
disabled riders was constructed by the 
Bates & Rogers Construction Corp.. 
600 W. Jackson Blvd., the lowest of 
five bidders on this project which cost 
$1,580,000. Federal and state 
governments funded this first of 
several street-to-subway elevator pro- 
jects under study by the CTA. 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 3 



11 




A«W»A«R«D»S 




John Antonucci, day foreman, Rosemont Terminal, proudly displays the terminal's second consecutive Zero Accident Program award, 
and congratulates Maintenance employees. Sharing in the celebration (background) is Richard Lorimer, superintendent, Rail Vehicle 
Terminals, South. 



Rosemont terminal, CTA's newest 
rapid transit facility, has captured its 
second consecutive first place honor in 
the Zero Accident Program. 

On the heels of its first ZAP award 
earned in the last quarter, maintenance 
personnel at the terminal destined to 
provide service to O'Hare International 
Airport, also took first place honors in 
the fourth quarter of 1983. 

The victory also entitles the new 
facility's maintenance personnel to a 
catered lunch, a treat set aside for the 
terminal and garage winning the six- 
month competition which ended Dec. 
31, 1983. The catered lunch is a new 
incentive effective since July 1, and is 
extended to maintenance personnel of 
the winning terminal and garage for 
both day and night shifts. 

First place honors in the garage com- 
petition for the quarter and winner of 



Rosemont, 

Forest Glen 

earn ZAP 

catered lunch 



the six-month lowest accident frequen- 
cy rate went to Forest Glen garage. 
Maintenance personnel at the garage 
were also treated to the catered lunch. 
J.F Dudley, safety supervisor, said 
all rail terminals and garage locations 
which have no injuries for the six- 
month period are automatically win- 
ners. Where there is no zero frequency 
rate, the garage or terminal with the 
lowest frequency rate will be the win- 



ner, he said. 

The determination will be made by 
using the standard calculated injury 
rate with handicap calculated for the 
six-month period. A minimum of two 
lunches will be catered for each six- 
month period, one for bus garages, 
and one for rail terminals. 

Other incentives for safety perfor- 
mance include the awarding of jackets 
and caps designed with the CTA logo, 
tie pins, travel mugs and gift certificates. 

First place ZAP awards also went to 
54th and the 61st/Racine terminals. 
Winners in the Bus Shops competition 
included the Sheet Metal shop, Vehicle 
Wiring, Upholstery, Brake shop. Utili- 
ty, Electrical Units Rebuild, Machine, 
Radiator and Print shops. At Skokie 
Rail Shops winners were Paint, Truck 
and Axle shops; Shop Service, and 
Blacksmith/ Welding. 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



New incentive in safety 

program could inspire 

an improved performance 

among terminal and 

garage personnel 




Jim Ward (left), day foreman at Forest Glen Garage, accepts 
the Zero Accident Program certificate on behalf of his crew 
from Tom Gecan, superintendent. North Side garages. 



Forest Glen maintenance employees make their way through the buffet line to 
partake of a repast of chicken, beef, pasta, assorted salads, relishes and 
desserts. 




Enjoying the catered luncheon at Rosemont are (left to right): Cisco 
Williams, day foremen (Howard), Cesar Tanchez, car servicer, and car 
repairers Mike Fahey and Roland Scheibe. 



Forest Glen's Zero Accident Program certificate rests 
among door prizes of jackets, caps, gift certificates and 
other rewards won by employees. 



1984 Vol. 37- No. 3 



13 



f 






9 




& 






^ 




k 


^p 




^fl 





Joe Siegal retires 

Joe Siegal, superintendent, Power and Wiring Design 
(right), accepts his retirement packet, and CTA's best 
wishes for a happy retirement from Ronald Swindell, 
director, Power, Signal and Communications 
Engineering. Siegal retired February 1 after 38 years 
of CTA service. He began his career on June 26, 
1946 as an assistant testing engineer with the Chicago 
Surface Lines. He was involved in several major 
substation renovations, the establishment of the Dan 
Ryan and Kennedy rapid transit lines, and the O'Hare 
Extension. Siegal was also a CTA representative with 
the American Public Transportation Association as 
chairman of the Power Committee and vice chairman 
of the Power Signal and Communications Committee. 



Va 

-c( r^ i \ 


/ 'few M 1 






At 65 plus 

Rubin Razor (second from left), accepts the coveted retirement 
folder from Director of Schedules Norman Oswald, as Principal 
Traffic Checker Vernon Coleman, (left), and Willie B. Scott, 
supervisor, Traffic Analysis, look on. The 68-year old traffic 
checker who retired February 1, joined CTA Dec. 31, 1964 as a 
bus operator. He was assigned to the Schedules Department July 
14, 1975. 




30-year veteran 

Simmons Gibson's wife Phyllis (left) and daughter Mary Ellen 
shared the honors at his retirement party February 28 in the Mart 
offices of Materials Management, where he most recently served 
as a file clerk. Gibson, a 30-year CTA veteran, plans to take his 
wife on a cruise before returning to their home in the Gresham 
neighborhood, on the South Side, where he'll do some fixing up 
and work on his hobby -- photography. 



* I 



Golden celebrations 

Two Forest Glen garage retirees and 
their wives recently celebrated 50 years 
of marriage. They are Mr. and Mrs. 
Herold Childers (left), and Mr. and Mrs. 
Herb Schmitt who observed their 
golden wedding anniversaries with 
friends at the Chicago Transit Authority 
Retirees Club of New Port Richey, Fla. 
Childers and his wife, Dorothy, ob- 
served their anniversary in October 
while Schmitt, and wife, Evelyn, 
celebrated November 15. Childers, a 
former bus operator, became a pen- 
sioner in February, 1974 while Schmitt, 
a clerk, retired in April, 1974. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



tjfc 



s 




Golden key honors 

Southern Illinois University senior Dianna 
Yedinak (at podium), daughter ot materials 
handling specialist Michael Yedinak and 
president ot the SIU chapter ot the Golden 
Key National Honor Society, gives remarks 
as Golden Key pays special recognition to 
outstanding members of the university 
and the Carbondale community. Included 
among recipients named as honorary 
members ot Golden Key were Governor 
James Thompson, and Carbondale Mayor 
Helen Westberg. 



Service anniversaries 
in March 



35 Years: 



Charlie Florence, Jefferson Park 
Norman Kujawa. South Shops 
Paul Malone. Power and Way 
Daniel Murphy. South Shops 
Paul Sauve. Power and Way 



30 Years 

Marie Albano. Claims 
Herman Lloyd. 77th Street 
Jerome Pavel. South Shops 
August Sanfilippo. Forest Glen 
James Skopec. District D 
Leonard Tucek, South Shops 
Ted Ulasy. North Avenue 
Young Walker Jr.. 77th Street 
John Wealer. District D 



25 Years 

A) don Bland Jr., Beverly 
John Campbell. Power and Way 
Samuel Coulter Jr.. 77th Street 
Rebecca Cousins. Administration 
Anita Curtis, Personnel Administration 
Dorothy Dismang, West Section 
Joseph Folken. Jefferson Park 
Donald Grudecki. Power and Way 
Judge Patrick. Forest Glen 
Henry Madden. North Park 
Graen McFadyen, North Avenue 
Alex Nesbitt. Power and Way 
John O'Riordan. Buildings and Grounds 
Joseph Piento. Comm Power Control 
Edgar Shaw, Power and Way 
Arthur Smith. Ashland Terminal 



New Pensioners 

CARL ANDERSON. Ticket Agent. 

North Section. Emp 4 1 57 
GORDON BALAZS. Area Supt . 

Bus District. Emp 7 -30-47 
HORACE CRAWFORD. Painter. 

West Shops. Emp 4-26 47 
ELV1N FORD. Clerk I. 

Schedules. Emp 10 31 51 
SIMMONS GIBSON. File Clerk. 

Materials Mgmt . Emp 5-21 53 
CATHERINE HAYMAKER. Travel Rep . 

Travel Center. Emp 9-27 72 
JOSEPH JOHNSON, Tinner. 

West Shops. Emp 6-15-59 
JOHN KELLY. Bus Operator. 

Beverly. Emp 6-4-46 
•DONALD LEMM. Manager. 

Insurance & Pensions. Emp 7 20-42 
NICK LaCORCIA. Unit Supvr . Strm . 

Skokie Shop. Emp 5-7 46 
DANIEL ODONNELL. Shop Tractor Oper . 

South Shops. Emp. 1-6-49 
JAMES OHSE. Superintendent. 

District B. Emp. 2-14-47 
JOHN PERESIN. Plumber. 

West Shops. Emp 4-26-47 
OSCAR PR1MM St., Bus Operator 

Limits. Emp 6-24-68 
JULIO RUIZ. Car Servicer. 

Howard. Emp 4-12-67 
WILLIAM THOMAS. Bus Serv Supvr . 

District A. Emp 7-1-46 
NICK TRIFFON. Bus Supervisor. 

District B. Emp 5-9-50 
CLEVEN WARDLOW Sr . Bus Operator. 

Limits. Emp 7-16-52 
•JAMES WILSON. Bus Repairer. 

Limits. Emp 3-15-67 

'Retroactive to 2- 1-84 

Disability Retirements 

SAMUEL HIGHSMITH Jr . Traff. Chkr.. 

Schedules, Emp 12-16-57 
DOROTHY PUGH. Ticket Agent. 

North Section. Emp 10-22-68 



irsT OVEEIIwIOI^I-A^IvI 



JULIO ADORNO. 39. 77th Street. 

Emp 7-6 76. Died 12-14-83 
HAROLD BELL. 76, Beverly. 

Emp 8 17-36. Died 1 24-84 
CHARLES BERRY. 51. 77th Street 

Emp 11 12-56. Died 12-26-83 
JAMES BOAL. 88. Way & Structs 

Emp 3-6 17. Died 1 21 84 
EDWARD BOLE. 67. Employment. 

Emp 5-25-34. Died 1 
PHILIP BOYLE. 78. South Shops. 

Emp 10 7 46. Died 1 23-84 
ROBERT BURTON. 62. South Shops. 

Emp 10-9-50. Died 12 20-83 
JAMES CALLAGHAN. 94. Way & Structs 

Emp 3 6 24. Died 1-7-84 
JOHN COOPER. 57. Veh Maint . 

Emp 8 20 70. Died 12 6 83 
LEO DOMRESE. 86. 77th Street. 

Emp 2 7 23. Died 1 . 



MICHAEL DUNNE. 86. 77th Stri 

Emp B 1-1 23 Dttd 1 1 
JAMES FOLAN. 69, Maintenance. 

Emp 10 29 56. Died 1 17 84 
JOSEPH GAMAUF. H'' 69th Sin ■ I 

Emp 2 15 17. Died 1 29 
ARTHUR GIVIN. K7. 77th StrMt 

Emp 10 1" 28 Dttd ! I 
ROBERT HARDY 59. West Shops. 

Emp 6 19 51. Die.i 
EDWARD HEAD Jr . 53, 77th Stn 

Emp 4 29 52. Died 1 :' 
FRANK JACOBSON. 75. Forest Glen. 

Emp 3 12 39. Died 1-9-84 
RUSSELL JUHRE. 62. Internal Auditing. 

Emp 5-23 77. Dk 
HUBERT KELSYNSKI. 80. Forest Glen. 

Emp i. 25 »7 Died 12 17 - 
MICHAEL KEOGH. 86. Way & Structs . 

Emp 9 5 29. Died 12-15 - 
ROBERT KIEHN. 52. Operations Planning. 

Emp 9 5 29. Died 12 l r . 
PAUL LASKY 83. Engineering. 

Emp 11-9-21. Died 1-27-84 
THOMAS McKEAN 86, 77th Street. 

Emp 1-3-29. Dn'.l 1 10 B4 
.JAMES McMULLEN. 93. Kedzie. 

Emp 6-12-29. Died 1-7 K4 
JOSEPH MINWEGEN. 85. Howard. 

Emp 8-2-18 Died 1 20-84 
JOHN MUHAMMAD. 52. 77lh Street. 

Emp 6-10-68. Died 1 5 84 
JOSEPH NASTI. 55. Maintenance. 

Emp 11 30 49. Died 1-10-84 
WILLIAM OESTERREICH. 88. Armitage. 

Emp 1-29-24. Died 1 4-84 
OLIVER O'NEAL. 39. Archer. 

Emp 10-1068. Died 11-27-83 
CHARLES PETERSEN. 73. Engineering. 

Emp 8-22 46. Died 12 27-83 
VITO PILEGGI. 89. North Section. 

Emp 8-2-46. Died 11-28-83 
HARRY PLENCNER. 59. Electrical. 

Emp 8 20-73. Died 11-22-83 
PETER RAPPOLD. 74. 77th Street. 

Emp 4-14 49. Died 1-16-84 
JAMES REGAN. 86. West Section. 

Emp 12 7-43. Died 1-11-84 
HELEN RICHARDS. 41. Transportation. 

Emp 6-23-77. Died 2-13 
MARY ROHR. 90. North Section. 

Emp 4-19-20. Died 1 
STANLEY SARNECKI. 77. Forest Glen. 

Emp 7-31 43. Died 1-28-84 
WALTER SCHMIDT. 83, North Avenue. 

Emp 11-22 27. Died 1 - 
EDWIN SCHULSTAD. 79. Limits. 

Emp 1-5-34. Died 1 2 84 
CHARLES STENNETT. 35. Human 
Resources. 

Emp 10-6-80. Died 3-3-84 
ERWIN STORKE. 78. West Section. 

Emp 7 22 27. Died 1-22-84 
EARL TIDLER. 88. West Section. 

Emp 9-18-19. Died 12 28-83 
GIUSEPPE VECCHIOLLA. 82. Way & 
Structs . 

Emp 2-24-43. Died 1 
LARRY VINE. 33. Howard. 

Emp 9-24-79. Died 11 18 83 
PERCY VIRGIL. 57. Management Services. 

Emp 7-30-52. Died 1-20 - • 
CLARENCE VLACH. 88. Archer. 

Emp 3 1 27. Died 1 
MAURICE WILLIAMS. 39. Limits 

Emp 10-12-67. Dwd 2 3 84 



7964 Vol. 37-No. 3 



75 



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for the June issue of TRANSIT NEWS: 

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CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume37 Number3 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 

Editor: Rick Willis 

Graphic Designer: Alexandra Elva 

Contributing Writers: Robert A. Gaines, 
Jeff Stern. Don Yabush 
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ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
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1984 Volume 37-Number 4 

Transit News 




RT A implements 

| LINK-UP PASS 

rail commuters 





RTA interim Chairman John Kramer (lett) 

and CTA Chairman Michael A Cardilli /oin 

in an informal ceremony marking the start 

ol the RTAs Linkup monthly bus ticket 

tor railroad commuters to use on buses 

to and from their tram trips The $25 

monthly ticket is valid Mondays through 

Saturdays on designated bus routes 



A 



nother step was taken April 2 in the six-county RTA 
service area regional fare integration plan with the sale of the RTA's $25 monthly Link-Up Pass. 
The new pass is designed for use by monthly ticket holders on commuter railroads, and will permit 

(continued on page 2) 



(continued from page 1) 

RTA implements Link-Up Pass.., 

them to continue their weekday and Saturday trips by using 
bus service at both ends of the commuter rail lines. The 
CTA's rapid transit system is not included in the Link-Up 
Pass program. 

The fare integration plan began shortly after the RTA was 
implemented with development of the universal transfer and 
integrated transit fares for all transit agencies funded by the 
RTA. Acceptance by both CTA and RTA of each other's 
monthly bus passes soon followed. 

The RTA Link-Up Pass, proposed last summer, will serve 
to cut costs of bus riding for monthly commuter railroad 
riders. The RTA has expressed the hope of increasing rider- 
ship on its suburban bus system, its six commuter railroads, 
and CTA buses. 

The Link-Up proposal was high on the agenda when the 
RTA interim board was created late last year. In order to in- 
sure the smooth implementation of the April 2 start of the 
plan, members of the CTA's Operations Planning Depart- 
ment, headed by Howard P. Benn, director. Route and 
System Planning, along with RTA staff, participated in 
weekly meetings on the Link-Up Pass program for the first 
three months of the year. 



the 



I Jink-up I 

monthly 
huh ticket 



Wte've found the missing link 
with our new RTA LINK-UP Monthly 
Bus Ticket RTA and CTA have 
linkedup to bring you convenience 
and low-cost riding. For only $25 a 
month the new LINK-UP Bus Ticket 
can be used on all RTA and CTA 
designated regular, feeder and 
shuttle bus routes to and from 
railroad stations in Chicago and the 
suburbs during rush hours. 
The LINKUP Monthly Bus Ticket 
can be purchased at selected sub- 
urban rail stations and all downtown 
rail terminals. 



For further information call 
(312) 836-4332. 8:30 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. daily, Monday- Friday. 



Regional lransportation Authority 



The Link-Up Passes are $25 each and are sold only with 
the purchase of an RTA monthly railroad ticket at 
downtown railroad stations and selected outlying railroad 
stations. 

The RTA has entered into a legal agreement with CTA to 
reimburse the CTA for lost or diverted revenue based upon 
the Link-Up Pass use on CTA buses. 

The Operations Planning Department. has estimated that 
approximately 10,000 railroad commuters who board CTA 
shuttle buses at the LaSalle street, Illinois Central Gulf, 
Union, and North Western railroad stations are eligible to 
use the pass. 

The Link-Up Pass is valid in downtown Chicago when 
pass holders are boarding designated bus routes at certain 
boarding locations near the downtown railroad stations bet- 
ween 5 a.m. and 10 a.m., and between 3 p.m. and 8p.m., 
Monday through Saturday. The pass is also valid during the 
same hours on all RTA or CTA routes which serve com- 
muter railroad stations outside of the downtown area. 

The Link-Up Pass will be honored by CTA bus operators 
only when it is shown with a valid RTA monthly railroad 
commuter pass upon boarding the bus. 



From the Chairman 

Changing seasons, 
new challenges 



CTA employees can look back on the long winter 
and take pride in the fine transportation that we pro- 
vided for millions of riders from the city and nearby 
suburbs. Crises like the holiday season's sub-zero 
weather and the Lake Street fire tested our abilities, 
while the continuous inconvenience caused by snow 
and cold weather tried our endurance. My fellow 
Board members and 1 congratulate you for meeting 
winter's challenge with a job well done. 

Looking ahead we must realize that, although it is a 
more pleasant season, summer also presents 
challenges and opportunities for CTA employees. 

The challenges, of course, are numerous and 
familiar. Hot weather can cause overheating and air 
conditioning malfunctions; sudden rain showers on 
summer days can make oily pavement become slip- 
pery and hazardous; and various sporting and recrea- 
tional events can cause crowding on our vehicles com- 
parable to the worst rush hours. We must meet sum- 
mer's challenges with the same spirit of dedication, 
cooperation, and courtesy that established our fine 
service record this winter. 

Summer is also a season of opportunities. Careful 
performance of duties and consideration for riders can 
convince new riders to become regular transit users, 
thus increasing ridership. Attention to the needs of 
riders, especially a willingness to assist tourists with 
directions and information, can lead to increased 
tourism that will boost our city's economy. 

Most of all, summer offers many excellent oppor- 
tunities to really get involved in CTA. Employees are 
always welcome to participate as judges, helpers, or 
spectators at events like the Bus Roadeo, the Third 
Rail Round-Up, and the new Ticket Agents' Competi- 
tion; and the competitors appreciate moral support 
from other employees who show interest in the 
events. Various operating locations have also planned 
picnics or other activities for summer enjoyment and 
comradery. 

So let's enjoy this summer by getting involved in 
CTA's summer activities; and let's begin selling CTA 
by showing the public that we are their agency, and 
that we wish to serve them by providing the best pos- 
sible transit service in the country. Each and every one 
of us can promote CTA through our presence in the 
community. 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



CTA Board appoints 
new general attorney 




Northwestern University law pro- 
fessor Joyce A. Hughes, a former 
member of the Chicago Board of 
Education, has been appointed CTA 
Genera] Attorney by the Chicago 
Transit Board. 

Miss Hughes who reports directly to 
the Chairman of the Board, will exer- 
cise supervision over all legal activities 
of the CTA, including law department, 
labor relations, worker's compensa- 
tion, claims, and real estate. 

To accept the CTA appointment 
which expires December 31, 1987, 
Miss Hughes relinquished her position 
as senior attorney for the Continental 
Illinois National Bank and Trust Com- 
pany of Chicago. 

CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli, 
commenting on the appointment, 
said, "Miss Hughes comes to the CTA 
with a background that covers the 
fields of education, banking, business, 
public service, and government. We 
are most fortunate that she accepted 
this appointment." 

The new CTA general attorney 
received her undergraduate degree 
magna cum laude from Carleton Col- 
lege, Northfield, Minnesota; was a 
Fullbright scholar at the University of 
Madrid, Spain, and was awarded the 
J.D. degree cum laude from the 
University of Minnesota. 

Her previous experience includes 
private practice of law in Minneapolis, 
where she was also general counsel for 
Community Electronics Corporation 
and counsel to the Plymouth Avenue 
Development Corporation. She has 
been an associate professor of law at 
the University of Minnesota, a consul- 



tant to the Office of Technology 
Assessment of the United States Con- 
gress, and a consultant to the Division 
of Government and Law of the Ford 
Foundation. 

Miss Hughes has also served the 
public as a member of the Governor's 
Council on Jobs and the Economy, 
U.S. Delegation to the Belgrade 
Follow-Up Meeting to the Helsinki Ac- 
cord, and the Illinois Supreme Court 
Committee on Rules of Evidence. 

She is a director of the Federal 
Home Loan Bank of Chicago, a vice 
president of Chicago's Community 
Renewal Society, and serves on the 
Board of Directors of Leadership 
Greater Chicago. 

Miss Hughes is a resident of the 
Hyde Park community. 



Bus, rail, ticket 
agents in 1984 
Roadeo contests 

CTA bus and rail roadeo commit- 
tees are gearing up for the Authority's 
1984 competition. 

Bus Roadeo Chairman William 
Thompson said qualified participants 
were selected from applicants vying 
for berths in this year's event. "We are 
striving for even greater participation 
than last year," said Thompson. "This 
would be a tremendous success for 
us." he added. 

Thompson said bus roadeo ap- 
plicants were given a written test at the 
Transportation Training Center cover- 
ing CTA operating procedures, defen- 
sive driving principles, and Rules of 
the Road. Simultaneous garage level 
preliminary driving competition is ten- 
tatively scheduled for the weekends of 
June 2-3, and June 9-10 at Forest 
Glen and 77th Street garages as con- 
testants compete for the Winning Cir- 
cle 20. 

Meanwhile, as rapid transit person- 
nel get set for the 1984 Third Rail 
Roundup, Arthur Hubbard, 
superintendent of rail instruction, told 
rail employees, "You made history in 

1983. The 1983 Third Rail Roundup 
was the culmination of profes- 
sionalism. Last year, we asked the 
question, 'Are you the trainman who 
will be Washington, D.C. - bound?' 
We are asking the same question for 

1984. We will be looking for you." 
Hubbard said applications for the 



Third Rail Roundup will be accepted 
beginning June 17 and continue 
through June 23. Names of individ- 
uals qualifying will by posted at ter- 
minals July 13, and written tests will 
be conducted at all nine terminals dur- 
ing the week of July 15-21. 

Hubbard said uniform judging and 
terminal competition will be held the 
week of July 29 through August 4, 
and winners will be posted the week of 
August 12. The final competition will 
be held in late August or the first week 
of September, Hubbard said. He said 
plans are also underway to include the 
conductor in this year's competition. 

In addition, 1984 presents the all 
new ticket agent competition, a first for 
the mass transit industry as well as the 
CTA. Samuel Smith, assistant super- 
intendent, Transportation Department 
Training Center, chairman of the ticket 
agent competition, said applications 
for the new contest will be available at 
terminals May 25 through June 8. 

Names of qualifying applicants in 
the ticket agent competition are ex- 
pected to be posted by June 18. Sec- 
tion level written tests will be con- 
ducted the week of July 1-8, while 
section level performance tests have 
been planned for the week of July 25. 

Smith said the top 10 finalists, and 
three section champions will be named 
the week of July 27 with final competi- 
tion tentatively set for late August. 



RTA chairman 
to recognize 
good works 

CTA employees have a special op- 
portunity to be rewarded monetarily for 
good works which go beyond their 
responsibilities to the riding public. 

RTA Chairman John D. Kramer is 
donating his salary of $1,000 per 
month to be used for rewarding deserv- 
ing personnel employed by any of the 
agencies under the RTA umbrella. The 
selection of honorees will be based on 
letters of recommendation, or tele- 
phone calls from the general public. 

A special committee has been named 
by the RTA chairman to review the 
recommendations on a regular basis. 
Recommendations should be mailed to 
RTA Incentive Programs. 300 North 
State Street. Chicago, IL 60610, or call 
836-4047 



1984 Vol. 37- No. 4 



Spring heralds opening of budget season 




On a much larger scale, budgeting helps CTA plan and prioritize expenses and activities. 



Spring is the harbinger of birds, 
flowers, grass, warm weather, new life 
and the baseball season. Spring is also 
the beginning of CTA's budget season! 

Budget Manager Jud Lawrie com- 
pared the CTA budget to the family 
budget. "We at CTA do much the 
same thing as the average family does 
sitting at the kitchen table discussing 
their budget," Lawrie said. "The fami- 
ly has mortgage payments, a car loan, 
medical expenses, educational needs 
and unforseen bills. CTA has many of 
the same types of needs. The difficulty 
comes in trying to balance what you 
want or need to do with the income 
you have available." 

Lawrie added that the average fami- 
ly is made up of four individuals, while 
the CTA has more than 12,000 
employees. Lawrie said, "The family 
discusses the budget in terms of tens of 
thousands of dollars; we at CTA talk in 
terms of hundreds of millions of 
dollars. Our problems, goals, and 
aspirations may be similar, but it is the 
magnitude and complexity of CTA's 
structure which necessitates the great 



demands made on the budget 
preparers in all departments 
throughout the system. 

This great demand for detail within 
the CTA budget network comes from 
a variety of different sources. "The 
CTA when viewed as a half-billion 
dollar corporation, must maintain 
good business and accounting pro- 
cedures," Lawrie said. "Although we 
do not have stockholders, per se, we 
are responsible to our riders, to 
various funding agencies, and 
ultimately to the tax payers. CTA is 
dedicated to providing good, efficient 
public transportation, and sound 
budgeting practice is one of the ways 
that we accomplish this goal." 

There are two primary purposes for 
budgeting—planning and control. 
Planning enables CTA to allocate its 
scarce resources to the needs of 
highest priority; and control uses the 
budget plan as a measure of actual 
performance throughout the year, 
identifying where budget variance pro- 
blems exist and where corrective ac- 
tion may be necessary. 



The annual budget development 
process begins in late-April and ends 
(some think it never ends) with final 
CTA Board approval in November. 
(Legislation passed in the last session 
of the Illinois General Assembly re- 
quires that the CTA budget be submit- 
ted to the Regional Transportation 
Authority for approval by November 
15.) 

The budgeting process is ac- 
complished through three stages: 1) 
department managers outline goals 
and identify problems; 2) detailed 
dollar requests are submitted and 
evaluated; 3) departments develop 
their annual budget "spread." 

Stage I ^mammammmmm^^^mm* 
Beginning in late April, the budget 
process starts at the department level. 
Department managers outline their 
goals, objectives, problems, and sug- 
gested changes. "This first phase is 
basically a narrative," Lawrie said. 
"Department managers review pro- 
grams and outline plans. It is in this 
first phase that department managers 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



can lay the foundation for changes 
from their existing budget levels. Such 
changes might include requests for ad- 
ditional personnel, funding for new 
programs, or methods of improving 
operations." 

The "narrative" is focused on con- 
cepts rather than numbers. It is re- 
viewed with the executive director, 
and initial decisions are made concer- 
ning funding priorities. These deci- 
sions then become the basis for the 
next, more detailed budgeting stage. 

Stage 2^mhmhmh 
Throughout the CTA there are ap- 
proximately 80 "budgeting units" 



tion of the department. In conjunction 
with departmental management, they 
can best decide where the money 
should go and where personnel 
changes can best be made." 

Once the budget is reviewed by the 
department manager, it is submitted to 
the Budget department. The budget is 
thoroughly examined, summarized 
and reviewed with the executive direc- 
tor. After this evaluation, the ex- 
ecutive director and the department 
manager discuss any changes. The 
final proposed budget is then compiled 
and presented to the Board for public 
hearings, possible modification, and 
final approval. 



feet can be monitored by the budget 
"spread", and any actions necessary 
to solve the problems can be quickly 
and accurately identified. 




Through careful budgeting, families plan for future needs and wants. 

Illustrations by Erwin Harris 



which are responsible for putting the 
$$ (dollars) next to the personnel, pro- 
jects, improvements, office supplies 
and everything conceivable within 
their respective departments. Stage 2 
begins in summer, and the budgeting 
units are generally the next organiza- 
tional level below the department. 

"We call the budgeting process both 
a 'bottom up' and 'top down' ap- 
proach," said Lawrie. "Budgeting 
needs are developed from the 'bottom 
up', and these needs are then 
evaluated within 'top down' funding 
targets. 

"The individuals who prepare the 
departmental requests are 'hands-on' 
front line people who know the opera- 



Stage 3 ^^m^^^mmm^mm^imt^mm 
After the budget has been ap- 
proved, it is broken down into very 
detailed form which is then "spread" 
over the 12 accounting periods of the 
year. This enables management to 
monitor budget performance very 
closely. Adherence to budget is a good 
reflection on the manager and 
demonstrates that the employees in 
the department are performing their 
jobs well. The budget "spread" is also 
an invaluable tool that helps the 
department manager quickly identify 
and prevent unfavorable budget varia- 
tions. 

If unforseen operating problems oc- 
cur during the year, their monetary af- 



Budget's Rolei 



What is the Budget Department's 
role in this process? Is the Budget 
Department really the "enemy", tak- 
ing a meat-axe approach to all budget 
requests? 

Lawrie responded, "Although it is 
clearly the Budget Department's 
responsibility to evaluate the relative 
priorities of budget requests and to fit 
all requests within available funds, it 
also plays the role of advocate for 
budget requests when it is convinced 
that the need is justified and the priori- 
ty is high." 

Guidance in the technical aspects of 
budget preparation can be obtained 
throughout the year from each depart- 
ment's budget coordinator. As a staff 
member of the Budget department, it 
is the budget coordinator's respon- 
sibility to work with assigned depart- 
ments to insure that their budget re- 
quests are prepared accurately and 
completely. The budget coordinator 
also learns the operations and needs 
of each assigned department and can 
help to represent these needs 
throughout the budgeting process. 

As you can see, the budget process 
is much more than top level manage- 
ment merely sitting with a red pencil 
crossing out this or that item. Rather, 
the complex process of preparation, 
summarization, analysis, executive 
review, and Board adoption takes six 
months to complete and a full year to 
monitor. 

Just remember when you are at the 
kitchen table with calculator paper 
streaming to the floor and you ask 
"Why am I doing a budget?", the 
answer comes when you can balance 
your income and expenses in such a 
way that a new car becomes possible, 
or a long awaited vacation. 

At CTA, we are no different The 
answer comes when we manage our 
fiscal resources in such a way that we 
are able not only to meet our basic 
needs, but also to have funds available 
for desired improvements It is in this 
way that we can best serve our riders 
and our employees. 



1984 Vol. 37- No. 4 



Commendation Corner 



^H 












tR ] 


"3$ 




s 




( X 




9 


\ 


1 






1 





Dorothy Coleman Moore 
(West Section) was the 
conductor of a Milwaukee/ 
Douglas train ridden by 
Father James Erwin, of 
South Ashland Avenue. "I 
wish to highly commend 
her for extra courteous and 
most helpful service. I have 
ridden this line for many 
years, and never observed 
a better employee. She an- 
nounced stations and im- 
portant places very clearly. 
She is very courteous in 
answering questions. After 
flying into O'Hare and 
boarding her train, I 
observed her helping 
travelers who did not 
speak English. The CTA 
and the city should be very 
proud of this lady who 
'gives her all' in her job." 



Lovettia Randolph (North Park garage) was com- 
plimented by Mrs. Lawrence Blixt, of Evanston, for her 
courtesy as operator of a No. 49B North Western bus. 
"Soon after I boarded at Howard, she saw an elderly man 
trying to catch the bus, and was kind enough to motion to 
him to take it easy, waiting a few seconds for him to make 
it. She had a large number of people get on at Pratt, and 
handled them beautifully, answering questions politely, 
with smiles and all-around efficiency. All in all, she was 
very considerate of her passengers, and should be com- 
mended for doing her job very professionally." 

Sam Thomas and Assistant Superintendent Rosalio 
Garcia (both from Washington garage) were thanked by 
Emma Williams, of Yale Avenue, for their help in serving 
her paraplegic son, Kurt. "Due to the hard work and 
perseverence of Superintendent Garcia and the bus 
drivers for Special Services, my son was able to complete 
two semesters at Kennedy-King College, and is now 
entering Olive-Harvey College to continue his education. 
Without this service, he would not be able to achieve this. 
I especially want to commend Sam Thomas, our driver. 
He was always kind, polite, considerate and compas- 
sionate, truly a joy to see each morning." 

Herman Trimuel (North Park, garage) was the 
operator of a No. 50 Damen bus that Mary Simunich 
rode one morning from her home on West Schiller 
Street. "It was a fearful day to be out, and the (Saturday) 
schedule was scanty. When we pulled up to North 
Avenue and dropped off passengers, there was a west- 
bound bus letting off a few more. The driver then pulled 
across the street and waited for possible northbound 
travelers. Sir Galahad couldn't have been more courtly, 
and I told him so and took his number. When I got off, he 
told me I made his day, and I replied that he had made 
mine, so we were even!" 




Jerome Perdue (Limits 
garage) was praised in let- 
ters from four riders of a 
No. 147 Outer Drive Ex- 
press bus for recovering 
the wallet of Joanne 
Keenan, of West 84th 
Street. Mrs. Keenan herself 
wrote: "Once inside the 
bus, I discovered that so- 
meone had taken my wallet 
out of my purse. A woman 
passenger pointed out the 
young man who had taken 
it. The door was still open, 
and the young man ran 
out. The bus driver im- 
mediately confronted him, so 
he dropped the wallet and 
continued running. You cer- 
tainly must know how much it 
means to have my money, 
credit cards and driver's 
license returned intact." 



Lawrence Turner (Forest Glen garage) was ap- 
preciated by Jacqueline Hinton, of North Lotus Avenue, 
for his handling of a No. 85 Central bus. "I found him to 
be interested in his job. He greets all his passengers with a 
smile or a 'Good evening.' Also, he announces the 
streets, and is well-groomed. Finally, he isn't a slow or a 
fast driver, but moderate, and I believe he gets to his 
destination on time and safely. Like they say, your ac- 
tions speak louder than words. This driver is a tremen- 
dous asset to CTA, and is worthy of more than a pat on 
the back, because it is hard sometimes to get along with 
fellow citizens." 

Patricia Cobb (North Park garage) was commended 
by P. L. Mough, who rode her No. 151 Sheridan bus one 
afternoon from 333 North Michigan. "She had a pleasant 
smile for every rider. She announced every stop loud and 
clear, and asked everyone to watch their step, also. By 
the end of my 20-minute ride, she had everyone on the 
bus laughing and talking about her great attitude and 
pleasant personality. She was helpful with directions for 
those lost souls in the big city, and I'm sure she made 
everyone's evening a lot more fun. She seems to enjoy 
her job, and that's nice to see." 

Anthony Zenner (North Park garage) "deserves 
special consideration," according to Ruth Schaeffer, of 
North Lake Shore Drive, who was a rider on his No. 151 
Sheridan bus. "He is by far the most courteous driver I 
have ever encountered. He makes my day whenever I 
am fortunate enough to board his bus. His sense of 
humor and pleasant personality make an otherwise 
uneventful trip a real pleasure . Anyone who can maintain 
a high level of passenger cooperation and manage to 
have a smile when conditions on the bus are crowded, 
and everyone feels they are being shoved around, 
deserves the highest reward." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




"Day in CTA" honorees (from left) Tom Collins, Allen Willis, Lindsey Carney, and Melvin 
Wark, pay close attention to bus controller James Stevens as he explains procedures 
conducted in the control center which primarily benefit operating personnel. 

the extinguisher to douse the fire as 
much as possible. Firemen arrived 
later to finish the job, and Operator 
Wark, a CTA employee since 1974, 
was rushed to a hospital where he was 
treated for smoke inhalation. 

Other "Day in CTA" honorees were 
Operators Allen Willis of North 
Avenue garage, and Tom Collins of 
Archer. If the worth of an individual is 
really measured by the good that a 
person does for others, then Operator 
Willis is truly a giant of a man. 

Since 1979, this 12-year veteran 
bus operator has donated his time, 
energy, and sometimes his money, as 
a coach of wheelchair softball. Last 
year, he and other wheelchair softball 
coaching staff members piloted 
Chicago's "Pacemakers" to a national 
championship in a tournament held at 
Soldier Field and sponsored by the 
Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. 

Good will ambassador Tom Collins, 
a CTA employee for 16 years, is an 
operator on the 129 Northwestern/- 
Franklin route. Riders on Collins' bus 
are pleased to have him aboard 
because they appreciate his profes- 
sionalism. His actions have always 
demonstrated his caring and responsi- 
ble nature. A recent letter from a rider 
on Collins' bus to CTA Chairman 
Michael A. Cardilli said, 'Mr. Collins is 
a friendly, pleasant, most courteous 
and helpful individual." 



Spirit of 
professionalism 
and service 
earns honors 

"A Day in CTA" honors were 
bestowed upon a motorman and three 
bus operators for outstanding profes- 
sionalism and community service. 

Motorman Lindsey Carney of 
Howard Street terminal was a recip- 
ient of the special recognition for his 
response to a signal from a man he 
saw standing on the platform at 
Jackson Street. Carney brought his 
North-South train to a halt in time to 
avoid contact with a man who had 
toppled onto the tracks from the 
Jackson Street platform. 

The 13-year veteran CTA 
employee immediately requested that 
power be turned off so that rescuers 
could remove the man from the 
tracks. The alert motorman's attention 
and prompt action is credited with sav- 
ing a life. 

In another life saving action, bus 
operation Melvin Wark of Forest Glen 
parked his east bound bus at 
Lawrence and Leavitt, grabbed his fire 
extinguisher and raced to a densely 
smoke-filled building. Wark broke 
through the burning building's doors to 
alert its tenants. Meanwhile, he used 



Thanks for a job 
well done 

Employees who have rea iued commend 

from the pubhr 

Nelson Anderson, Ashland 
Marcos Argudin, Forest Glen 

Danryl Barber, North Avenue 
Searcy Barnett, North Park 
John Bright, Douglas/Congress 

Jean Cage, North Park 
Marvin Chachere, North Park 
Raul Cisneros, Archer 
Gerald Cottone, North Avenue 

Leon Davis, 77th Street 

Harper Donahue Jr., 77th Street 

Wilfred DuPree, North Park 

Elmer Elem, Archer 
Raphael Emery, North Park 

Albert Fields, North Park 
William Finley Jr., North Avenue 

Juan Gonzalez, North Avenue 
Richard Grady, Limits 

Hyman Harrison, Forest Glen 
A. Haskin, Forest Glen 
Humber Home, Ashland 

Donald Jackson, Limits 

William Markowski, Forest Glen 
Calvin McCants, 69th Street 
Howard Means, Washington 
George Michko, 77th Street 

Dianna Owens, Forest Glen 

Jerome Perdue, Limits 
Beverly Phillips, 77th Street 
Edward Pietri, Jefferson Park 

Donald Reed, Beverly 
Jesus Rivera, North Park 
Chester Robertson, Archer 

Gary Schneider, Howard/Kimball 

Billy Small, North Park 

Albert Smith Sr., North Avenue 

Harold Taylor, 77th Street 

Earl Walker, 77th Street 
Rusher Watson, North Avenue 
William Wilson, North Park 

Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



7984 Vol. 37-No. 4 




London's famous red double deck buses do a turn around Nelson monument in Trafalgar Square. 



(Mike Cramer and Steve Hastalis, 
customer assistance coordinators, 
travel the industrialized world seeking 
different forms of public transit to ride 
on and to report about. This is another 
episode from Mike Cramer's Transit 
Diary.) 

For some time we have wanted to 
visit London, England, but we 
were deterred by either the lack of 
travel time, money, or both. Last 
November that all changed. We found 
a pair of round trip flights at $486 each 
plus 10 days vacation each just too 
good to pass up. 

On November 29, we boarded an 
Air Canada flight at O'Hare Airport, 
flew to Toronto for a change of planes, 
and by 7:30 a.m. November 30 we 
were disembarking at London's 
Heathrow Airport. 

The first impression one has of 
Heathrow is the size of the place. We 
have repeatedly been told by friends 
that Heathrow was BIG. They were 
wrong. Heathrow is ENORMOUS. 
But, first things first. 

After nipping through customs and 
immigration, we headed for the Lon- 
don Transport underground (subway 
to the uninitiated). From Terminal No 
3 at Heathrow we took a series of 
three moving sidewalks to the 
underground station. 



London Transport has an offer we 
could not refuse--a week-long pass for 
unlimited riding at a cost of $18 each. 
The alternative was to purchase in- 
dividual tickets and pay by distance to 
a specific station. 

The passes are a gilt edge bargain 
since London has some of the highest 
public transit fares in the world. 

We paid for our passes and went 
down to the train platform where we 
boarded the Piccadilly line for the trip 
to our hotel. The cars on the Piccadilly 
line are slightly longer, lower, and nar- 
rower than CTA's cars. Also, the car 
bodies are rounded, reminding one of 
an airplane without wings. These cars 
are part of London Transport's tube 
stock. 

Our hotel was located at Strand 
street near Covent Garden. The Pic- 
cadilly line would have taken us within 
a block of it, but, we received some in- 
correct directions, needlessly changed 
trains, and got off three blocks from 
our hotel. 

The Covent Garden area, once a 
fruit and vegetable market, has been 
changed to a delightful shopping area 
replete with boutiques, specialty 
shops, and restaurants. But more im- 
portant, it is the site of the London 
Transport Museum-one of our 
destinations. 

This transit museum tells the story 



through displays and graphics of 
public transportation in London from 
early horse-drawn cars, to a coal-fired 
steam engine used in the 
underground's tubes to haul passenger 
cars, single and double-deck buses, 
and various street cars. London, of 
course, is famous for its red, double- 
deck buses. Modern subway and sur- 
face vehicles also are displayed. 

We each purchased, before our 
departure from Chicago, a one-week 
British Rail pass for the National 
Railway of Great Britain. The cost was 
$147 each, an excellent bargain since 
Britain. Scotland, and Wales have 
high frequency rail service. 

High speed diesel-powered trains 
travel up to 125 mph, so we managed 
to make trips to the cities of York, 
Redding, Greenwich, Leeds, and 
Carlisle, to name a few. 

One non-transit note: London is not 
a city where one goes looking for great 
food. We did enjoy the traditionally 
English steak and kidney pie, but for 
those who don't favor British cuisine, 
there's always a handy Burger King, 
Wendy's, a McDonald's, or a pizza 
place. 

We only spent eight days in England 
and hope to return for an extended 
visit. Friends who know England well 
advise a month's visit. I'm inclined to 
agree with them. . 



8 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Coal fired steam engine in London Transport 
museum was once used to pull underground 
cars through London's tubes. 

Middle Left: 

Cramer sits at mockup of old control box of 
retired driver's cab on display in the Transport 
museum. The c\ nest on (power control device) 
is on the left side. 

Middle right: 

Mike Cramer, customer assistance coordinator, 
pauses in London Transport 's museum beside a 
retired "tube" car used in the underground 
around the turn of the century. 

Bottom: 

Driver on British Rail's Midland Electric line 
chats with two rail supervisors who escorted 
Cramer and Steve Hastalas. customer 
assistance coordinators, on rail trips round the 
British capitol. 





All three of CTA'S Culture Bus routes originate in front of the Art Institute, on Michigan just south of Adams, where Chicagoans and 
visitors alike board articulated buses for direct trips to the city's major cultural attractions, and listen as commentators provide historic 
and other information about points of interest along the way. 



Culture bus is back, fare structure changes 



CTA's eighth Culture Bus season • 
began Sunday, May 27, when the 
"Big Bend" buses used for the service 
returned to their warm-weather ter- 
minal in front of the Art Institute, on 
Michigan just south of Adams. 

Service on all three Culture Bus 
routes will operate every Sunday and 
holiday until September 30, carrying 
riders to more than 30 cultural attrac- 
tions on the South, North, and West 
sides. 

Routing and schedules remain the 
same as last year, with West route 
buses leaving every 30 minutes be- 
tween 10:35 a.m. and 4:05 p.m.; 
South route buses departing at 
20-minute intervals from 10:40 till 
4:40; and North route buses, every 30 
minutes from 10:45 till 4:45. Round 
trips take from Vfy to IV2 hours each. 

The major change in 1984 is the 



fare. A Culture Bus Supertransfer now 
costs $2 for adults and $1 for children, 
or for senior citizens or disabled riders 
with a Special Users Travel Card. 

Step-up provisions allow adult 
riders presenting a standard Super- 
transfer to pay an additional 60 cents 
for the same all-day riding privilege on 
the Culture Bus, while children and 
others pay and extra 30 cents. 

Similarly, adult riders with a Month- 
ly Pass pay and additional $1 for a 
Culture Bus Supertransfer, while 
seniors are asked for an extra 50 
cents. These same amounts are also 
required of riders presenting a valid 
standard transfer. 

The increase is necessary because of 
the premium service being offered. In 
providing direct service between 
museums and other cultural attrac- 
tions, Culture Bus functions like cer- 



tain express bus and train routes that 
currently require a surcharge fare. 

In addition. Culture Bus riders 
receive printed flyers and picture 
guides produced by the Public Affairs 
Department to provide information 
about cultural stops, their hours of 
operation and admission charges. The 
literature includes schedules of the 
times buses leave each stop and iden- 
tifies attractions, such as the Sears 
Tower Skydeck and John Hancock 
Center Observatory, where discounts 
are offered to persons showing a 
Culture Bus Supertransfer. 

Above all, there is the professional 
touch provided by the volunteer com- 
mentator aboard each bus. Using a 
built-in public address system, the 
commentator tells riders historic and 
other information about points of in- 
terest along the routes with the aid of a 
script prepared by Public Affairs. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



CTA workers 
rescue youth 
from Garfield Park 
lagoon 



Something more than routine is 
what you would have to call the first 
stop of the day on Friday, March 23, 
for electricians Ray King Jr. and Harry 
Walter. The two night shift employees 
had just left West Shops in their 
Building and Wiring Maintenance van 
when they noticed three youngsters 
playing on the ice in the Garfield Park 
lagoon. 

As they passed nearby, they saw 
two of the boys jump to shore as the 
ice began to break up beneath them. 
The third and bigger boy didn't make 
it, and fell into the frigid water. With 
that. King picked up his radio- 
telephone and called the Control 
Center. 




Ray C. King calls Control Center re- 
questing rescue assistance for a youth in 
icy waters at Garfield Park. 

Help was on the way, but the ques- 
tion was, would it come soon enough 
to save the youth, who apparently 
could not swim? 

Instinctively, King drove the van 
across the park and as close as he 
could get to the lagoon. He and 
Walter then jumped out and pulled 




Harry Walter takes a ladder from atop his 
maintanence truck to rescue a 12-year old 
boy from the Garfield Park lagoon. 

two 20 foot ladders from a rack on the 
roof. 

After calling to the youth to hold on- 
to the ice floe, King inched himself out 
along one of the ladders that he and 
Walter had pushed across part of the 
floating ice. As he worked his way 
closer, King kept reassuring the youth, 
who was still some distance away. 

By that time firemen from Truck 26 
had arrived and were able to use their 
own longer ladders to complete the 
rescue. In the process, King and two 
of the firemen themselves fell into the 
lagoon. 

The 12-year-old boy was taken to 
St. Anne's Hospital, where he was 
treated for exposure. Fortunately, he 
was none the worse for the ordeal 
other than being cold and scared. 

King got an early break on his night 
shift so he could go home and change 
into dry clothes. For King, 33, it was 
the kind of experience he couldn't 
have anticipated when he joined CTA 
only a year earlier. Walter, 40, has 
been on the job five months less. 

Facilities and Engineering 
Maintenance Manager Tom 
Wolgemuth said, "In dealing with the 
public, CTA is constantly concerned 
about safety. What these men did was 
to extend this concern on a direct per- 
sonal basis and at considerable risk to 
themselves. Their quick response 
reflects great credit on themselves and 
on CTA." 



Submit retirement 
applications early 

If you're planning to retire soon 
your application should be submitted 
to the Pension Section not later than 
the 14th day of the month preceeding 
the effective date of your retirement. 

As an example, an employee plan- 
ning to retire August 1, 1984, should 
have an application on file with the 
secretary's office on or before July 14, 
1984. Applications should be obtained 
from the individual's department. 

If you work in: You should see: 

Transportation Walter Lemons, 

Ext. 4136 
Fred Jones, 
Ext. 4128 
Rm. 760 - Mart 

Mike Rickson 
3900 W. Maypole 
722-6700 
Ext. 504 

Leonard Beatty 
Madison & 
Wabash 
263-4434 
Ext. 2274 

Eddie Evans 
7801 S. Vincennes 
874-7100 
Ext. 303 

Harold Berndt 
3900 W. Maypole 
722-6700 
Ext. 408 

Ruth Havlik 
Rm. 700 - Mart 
Ext. 4011 

John Cannon 
Rm. 714 - Mart 
Ext. 4515 

Mary Beth Hurley 
Rm. 742 - Mart 
Ext. 3476 



Plant 

Maintenance 
(West Shops) 



Rail & Surfaces 
Janitors 



Vehicle 
Maintenance 
(South Shops) 

Surface Janitors 



Operations 
Planning 



Accounts 
Receiuable 



Personnel/ 
Area 605 



Rail Vehicle Lynn Bretz 

Maintenance 3701 Oakton 

(Skokie Shops) 973-3280 

(New personnel have been 
designated in some cases to handle 
retirement applications for their 
departments since the listing published 
in January. The new designees are 
listed in italics.) 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 4 



11 




Chicago chapter members, Conference of Minority Transportation Officials (COMTO) 
meet for lunch at Catfish Digby's where they were part of a financial planning and invest- 
ment seminar conducted by Ms. ft J. Quinn. financial planner/investment advisor Stand- 
Tng are Emetine Flient, Capital Development, a member of the COMTO education com- 
mittee, seminar sponsors; Ms. Quinn; Betty Edwards, Community Relations, President 
COMTO Chicago chapter; and Celso Castellanos, Facilities Engineer ng and 
Maintenance, COMTO executive committee member. Seated (from left) are Anita Curtis 
Human Resources, executive committee member; Anna DelRivero, Labor Relations, and 
Nidia Rodriguez, Financial Services. 

Development, and Ella Otis, Internal 
Auditing. 

Ms. Quinn is a registered investment 
advisor, and a member of the Institute 
of Certified Financial Planners, the 
National Association of Security 
Dealers, and the International 
Association of Financial Planners. 

Officers of the Chicago Chapter of 
COMTO are Betty Edwards, presi- 
dent; Ernest Sawyer, vice president; 
Marjorie Holmes, secretary, and 
Charles E. Marble, treasurer. 



Hold financial 
planning seminar 
for COMTO members 



CTA/RTA employees associated 
with the Conference of Minority 
Transportation Officials, Chicago 
chapter, joined other members of the 
Chicago business community as par- 
ticipants in a financial planning and in- 
vestment seminar March 24. 

The seminar, held at Catfish Digby's 
Restaurant, was conducted by Ms. 
R.J. Quinn, financial planner/invest- 
ment advisor for Wardell and Reed 
Associates, who gave insight into com- 
prehensive financial and tax planning 
as well as retirement and employee 
benefit plans, and risk management 
strategies. Participants also received a 
prospectus on investment analysis. 

The seminar was sponsored by 
COMTO's education committee, Fred 
G. King, chairman. Other members of 
the committee are Diane Mitchell, 
Operations Planning; Maria Martinez, 
Law/Claims; Ernestine Flient, Capital 



G.O. credit union 
sets annual meeting 

The CTA General Office Federal 
Credit Union, located at the Merchan- 
dise Mart, will hold its annual meeting 
to elect officers and make financial 
reports on Friday, June 29, in the 
CTA cafeteria at the Mart. 
• Herbert Schomer, Credit Union 
treasurer/manager, said the meeting 
is set for 5 p.m. Box dinners will be 
available, and door prizes will be 
awarded. 



Law for Today 

Q. I co-signed a bank note for a 
friend who demonstrated his 
friendship by skipping town and 
leaving me to pay the obligation 
of $2,300. How can I legally 
recover this debt from my friend? 

A. The borrower who defaults on a 
loan is liable for reimbursing a 
person who co-signed at his or 
her request. In cases where reim- 
bursement is not voluntary, the 
co-signer should seek legal 
representation to obtain a judg- 
ment against the borrower for the 
amount owed. It may then be 
possible to make a claim against 
the borrower's wages or pro- 
perty. 

- Illinois State Bar Association 



Q. My husband is supporting a 
1 6-year-old son from a prior mar- 
riage. Will he have to continue 
paying support until the boy is 18 
even if he is out of school and 
working or in the Armed Forces? 

A. No. Child support payments may 
normally be stopped before a 
child reaches majority (18 years 
old) if that child has become self- 
supporting or has been legally 
emancipated. 

- Illinois State Bar Association 



We've owned some property in 
the country for several years. 
We'd intended to build on it, but 
the tight money situation makes 
that difficult. Instead, we've 
decided to move a house trailer 
onto the lot and fix it up like a 
permanent home. The only hitch 
is that the zoning board says 
"no." Doesn't a family have the 
right to have the home it wishes 
on its own land? 

It does, as long as that home con- 
forms to the zoning laws of the 
community. 

- Illinois State Bar Association 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Casey is back, 
models flying high 

When a myriad of physical pro- 
blems began to take their toll on 
Casimir (Casey) Strzynski three years 
ago, the South Shops machinist, then 
57-years old, retired on disability. 

The CTA veteran of 35 years ser- 
vice enjoyed his job, and he was very 
active in two radio controlled model 
airplane clubs, and their competitive 
flying events. Thus, becoming a 
disability pensioner was the last thing 
he had planned for his future. 

Life had been so full for Casey, but 
now it was as though a light was clicked 
off as his multiple physical problems 
closed in to cast a pall over his hopes 
for a brighter future in retirement. 

However, a bit more in the pink 
these days, Casey has returned to his 
love of being a model aircraft hobbyist. 
"Mike Stroden, the CTA's employee 
assistance coordinator, was one of 
those whose efforts on my behalf kept 
me out of the 'friendly confines' of the 
old rocking chair and helped me 
regain most of my health-and my 
life," Casey said. 

Strzynski's wife, family and friends 
provided him with the love and sup- 
portive interest which carried him 
through those initial months of being 
on disability. "You could say I was in 
pretty bad shape," Casey recalls. 
"Without the love of my family and 
friends, I don't want to think about 
what would have happened." 

When he regained most of his 
health he returned to his hobby. "It 





Casimir (Casey) Strzynski works on fuselage of radio controlled model of World War II 
Gen. Jimmy Doolittle's bomber in his home workshop. 

ing competitions where he sits and 
answers inquiries about his favorite 
sport . 

"I get a big kick from answering 
questions about model plane building 
and flying from boys and girls. I want 
them to get into this fine sport which 
they can actually control from the 
drawing board to the final competi- 
tion. I started building $4 models at 
17. They cost a lot more now, but 
planes, the engines, and most of all 
the judged competitions are more 
wonderful, to say nothing of fresh air, 
sunshine, and good friends," he said. 

For additional information about 
building and flying radio controlled 
model airplanes, contact Casimir 
Strzynski, 5331 S. Francisco Ave., 
Chicago, IL 60632. 

"Just because I'm on disability pen- 
sion doesn't mean I'm not flying high- 
with my model planes," Casey quipped. 



Minnow pylon racer captured the "Best of 
Show" award at this year's Model Aviation 
Academy competition which drew 60 en- 
tries to the Chicago Ridge Mall. Casey's 
entry goes more than 100 m.p.h. 

was very slow going at first, but I kept 
working at making model planes. At 
first I made silly mistakes, started over, 
made more mistakes, and began again 
until I got the job right," Casey said. 

Friends from his model plane flying 
clubs drove by and began taking him 
to club meetings when he felt stronger. 
Now he feels good enough to go to fly- 





Casey proudly shows off his Doolittle bomber model at recent 
model competition and show. His gasoline powered bomber, 
which has a five-foot wingspan, was judged "Best of Show" held 
in Orland Square Mall. 



Gull wing Stinson model of late 1930s plane by Casey has seven- 
foot-long wing removed. Next to it is the "Best of Show" trophy 
this model won. Model planes weight about six or seven pounds. 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 4 



13 



Retirement celebration honors Skokie warehouse supervisor 




Congratulations all around were for Nick LaCorcia (third from left), unit supervisor at Skokie Warehouse 42, Stores Department, who 
retired March 1 after 38 years of CTA service. Well wishers were (from left), Jim Zazula, supervisor. Stores North; Matthew Rago, procure- 
ment analyst; LaCorcia, accepting a fond farewell from Ed Tobin, Manager, Materials Management; Nick LaCorcia's sons, Bert, and 
Nick, and Bill Roman, director, Stores. 



Some 200 family, friends, and 
special guests attended a retirement 
party at Skokie Warehouse 42 in 
honor of Unit Supervisor Nick 
LaCorcia who joined other CTA pen- 
sioners March 1 after 38 years of ser- 
vice. 

LaCorcia began his CTA career in 
1946 as a laborer in the Stores Depart- 
ment at West Shops following his 
discharge from service with the U.S. 
Army's 101st Airborne, Screaming 
Eagle Division. His military service in- 



cluded participation in the Allied 
Forces' D-Day invasion of Europe on 
June 6, 1944. 

In 1947 he was promoted to stock 
clerk I, and 11 years later was trans- 
ferred to Storeroom 42 where he re- 
mained until his retirement. There he 
was promoted to stock clerk 2 in 
1969, and in 1974, he was named 
senior storekeeper. His elevation to 
unit supervisor came on June 14, 
1981. 

A career highlight for LaCorcia was 



the enormous savings for CTA of 
$90,000 in 1981, which was realized 
when LaCorcia correctly identified an 
error in a vendor price list. Then 
Group Manager Larry Pianto, 
Materials Management, penned a let- 
ter of commendation to the unit super- 
visor for his dedication to service 
which greatly benefitted CTA. 

Five years earlier, LaCorcia had 
been nominated for the Superior 
Public Service Award which is spon- 
sored by the City of Chicago. 





Farewell Friends 

The mock headline proclaims the happy event for Gordon 
Balazs, area superintendent, Bus Service, who retired 
March 1 after 37 years of service. Gordie's Transportation 
Department co-workers feted him with an open house in 
honor of the occasion. 



Traffic checker retires 

Traffic Checker Samuel Highsmith (left) accepts his retire- 
ment packet from Norman Oswald, director, Schedules. 
Highsmith, a 27-year employee, started with CTA as a bus 
operator in December, 1957. He joined the Schedules sec- 
tion as a traffic checker in December, 1978. He and his 
family will reside in their Near North Side home. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Retiree observes 99th birthday 




Tom Murphy, a CTA pensioner 
for 31 years, observed his 99th birth- 
day on April 16 

A conductor for 43 years. Murphy 
was assigned to Kedzie barn when he 
retired in 1953. He and his wife, 
Jane moved to Thousand Oaks, 
California where he still resides. 

Ms. Vita M. Sloyan, Murphy's 
daughter, also of Thousand Oaks, 
said her father is in good health and 
keeps busy by tending his garden. 
His six great grandchildren, 
celebrating St. Patrick's Day, and 
keeping up with the Notre Dame 
Fighting Irish are also sources of joy 
for him. 



Service anniversaries 
in April 

1 40 Years i 




Carmella Petrella, 

Payroll Acctg. 



35 Yearsi 



Cornelius Gillespie, Mech Main! 



25 Yearsi 



Eugene Caldwell, North Park 

Robert Cowan, North Avenue 

William Fisher, 77th Street 

Joseph Flynn, Mech Maint 

James Hurst, Mech Maint 

Fred Jones, Admin. Srvcs. 

Henry Martin, 77th Street 

Robert Potrzeba, Howard/Kimball 

Willie Robinson. 77th Street 

Karel Slootmans Jr., Elec. Eng & Maint 

Booker Thomason, 69th Street 




Twin boys, Matthew Edward, and Ronald 
Vernon Williams, were born to car ser- 
vicer Herbert and Debra Williams, March 
17 at Augustana Hospital. The boys 
each weighed 6 pounds, 8 ounces, and 
measured 21 inches in length. Mr. and 
Mrs. Williams are also the parents of 
three other children; Kristian, 1 1; Tyrone, 
8, and Herbert, Jr., 19 months. 




Transportation Clerk Helmut 
Stankevlcius, North Avenue Garage, and 
his wile, Linda, are the parents of a son 
born January 28, 1984. The baby, William 
Anthony, was born at Elmhurst Memorial 
Hospital and weighed 7 pounds, 3 
ounces, and was 20 inches long. 



New Pensioners 

SHERMAN ADAMS. Bus Operator. 

Beverly, Emp. 11-16-53 
DAVID BOURNE. Ticket Agent. 

63rd/Ashland. Emp. 10-8-56 
RUFUS BOYD. Bus Operator. 

Limits. Emp 8-13-53 
ROBERT CHAMBERS, Control Center. 

Transportation, Emp. 8-25-55 
HELEN DOHERTY. Steno. V.. 

South Shops, Emp 6-9-47 
ANDREW GRABOWSKI. Bus Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp. 10-8-53 
EDWARD GRAETZ. Yard Foreman. 

Kimball. Emp. 12-18-45 
LEROY HAGEN. Frmn, Elec. Wrkrs . 

South Shops. Emp. 3-4-42 
MARIE HAVLIK, General Clerk, 

West Shops. Emp. 8-24-43 
EUGENE HENDREE. Painter. 

West Shops, Emp. 10-25-51 
MARY HENDRICKSON, Clerk III, 

Skokie Shops. Emp 6-6-57 
PATRICK HOEY. Machinist, 

West Shops. Emp. 6-11-46 
HENRY KOHLER. Instructor. 

77th Street. Emp. 3-3-50 
ANDREW LEE. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp 8-11-55 
DARRELD MERCURE. Car Repairman, 

Kimball. Emp 10-8-53 
LAWRENCE PAGE, Clerk. 

69th Street. Emp. 2-5-53 
RONALD ROY. Supervisor, 

North Avenue. Emp. 1-24-46 



AUGUST SAN FILIPPO. Bus Repairer. 

Forest Glen. Emp 3-2-54 
HERMAN SEMON. Carpenter. 

West Shops. Emp 8-23 45 
JOHN THUROW. Money Handler. 

South Shops. Emp 2 16-46 
"ARTHUR WILLIAMS Jr . Janitor. 

West Shops. Emp 7-26-56 
CHARLES S L WILLIAMS. Bus Servicer 

69th Street. Emp 6-6-57 

Disability Retirements 

EDWARD CONNER. Conductor. 

54th Street. Emp 1-6-69 
EDDIE GRIFFIN, Bus Operator. 

Limits. Emp 1 6-69 
CHARLIE MOORE. Yard Foreman. 

West Section. Emp 11-24-50 

'Retroactive to 3-1-84 



IN TS/LttlS/LOFlT^lS/L 



HERMAN AMBOS. 77. North Park. 

Emp. 11-26-42. Died 2-7-84 
CHARLES BAKER. 91. 77th Street, 

Emp 5-24-13, Died 2-4-84 
HUGH BARNES. 72. North Section. 

Emp. 10-16-45. Died 2-4-84 
ERVIN BREST, 71. Archer, 

Emp. 8-8-41, Died 2-6-84 
ERNEST BUERGERMEIER. 72. Archer, 

Emp. 12-21-36. Died 2-14-84 
HARRY CARTER, 63. 77th Street. 

Emp 7-24-51. Died 2-6-84 
CARLO DISPETTO, 76, Engineering, 

Emp. 8-22-29, Died 2-4-84 
PATRICK DOHERTY. 79, North Park. 

Emp 9-9-42. Died 1-26-84 
FELIX DUNNE. 71, Engineering, 

Emp. 6-25-48. Died 2-8-84 
HAROLD ERICKSON. 81, Forest Glen. 

Emp 6-4-24. Died 2-7-84 
RUDOLPH GAMPERL, 80, Engineering. 

Emp 8-31-45. Died 2-15-84 
JOHN GLEASON, 87, West Section, 

Emp 8-28-23, Died 10-11-83 
ARTHUR HABICH, 73. 77th Street. 

Emp. 6-25-48, Died 2-4-84 
JAMES HERRON. 69. Forest Glen. 

Emp 9-18-45, Died 2-1-84 
LEROY KIRCHOFF. 84. Purchasing, 

Emp 2-3-36, Died 2-3-84 
GEORGE KULLOWITSCH. 85, West Shops. 

Emp. 8-12-36. Died 2-6-84 
SAM LUCCHESI. 79. Engineering. 

Emp 3-11-25, Died 2-12-84 
JOHN O'DONNELL. 83. Kimball. 

Emp 5-8-23. Died 2-10-84 
JOHN O'SULLIVAN. 85. Forest Glen, 

Emp 12-28-65, Died 2-27-84 
EDWARD PSIODA. 68. Plant Maint . 

Emp 3-25-36. Died 2-9-84 
KENNETH RUEHLMANN. 67. North Section. 

Emp 12-3-45. Died 2-28-84 
EDWARD SEGERSON. 74. West Section. 

Emp 8-27-42. Died 2-22-84 
ALBERT STAHL. 93. West Shops. 

Emp 5-6-29, Died 2-9-84 
RUSSELL STROHACKER. 61. District B. 

Emp 4-22-46. Died 2-16-84 
WILLIAM WHITE. 85. Const. & Maint . 

Emp 6-25-20. Died 2-17-84 



7984 Vol. 37-No. 4 



15 











IS EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 


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Keep people working 






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CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume37 Number4 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 

Editor: Rick Willis 

Graphic Designer: Alexandra Etva 

Contributing Writers: Robert A. Gaines, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734. Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, Il- 
linois 60654. 



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Raising their glasses in a 
toast of appreciation to the 
honorees are (from left) 
Elonzo Hill, director, Training/ 
Instruction; State Senator 






Testimonial for 

excellence is a 

celebration of pride 

More than 1,050 CTA operating employees were 
honored in a "celebration of pride" at McCormick 
Place Saturday, May 12 in recognition of excellence in 
public service to the people of Chicago. 

The honorees were CTA workers whose records of ser- 
vice in 1983 demonstrated outstanding performance. 
Among them were outstanding line instructors, Employee 
Safety/Performance Program team leaders, Third Rail 
Roundup/Bus Roadeo contestants, "Day in CTA" 
honorees, and million milers. Recipients included 
employees recently retired in 1984. 

The honored employees and their guests filled Halas Mall 
to capacity where they were greeted enthusiastically by 
Deputy Executive Director, Operations, Harry Reddrick, 

(continued on page 2) 



Charles Chew, Jr., 
Harry Reddrick, deputy 
executive director, Operations 
and John Weatherspoon, 
president, Amalgamated 
Transit Union 241. 



Testimonial for excellence 



(continued from page 1) 




State Senator Charles Chew, Jr. prepares to read Governor J ames 
Thompson's proclamation of "CTA Striving for Excellence Day in 
Illinois "as Harry Reddrick, deputy executive director, Operations, 
registers approval. 



State of Illinois Proclamation 

WHEREAS, the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) 
Striue for Excellence Testimonial is designed to be a 
celebration of pride in the CTA's contribution to ex- 
cellence in public service; and 

WHEREAS, more than 1,000 employees will be 
honored at this event for their dedication to public ser- 
vice and superior professional performance; and 

WHEREAS, categories of competition stressed 
dependability, team work, employee and passenger 
safety and an established record of outstanding 
achievement; 

THEREFORE, I, James R. Thompson, Governor of 
the State of Illinois, proclaim May 12, 1984, as CTA 
STRIVE FOR EXCELLENCE DAY in Illinois, in 
recognition of these employees' special efforts that 
benefit the thousands of people served by the CTA 




and Director of Training/Instruction Elonzo Hill. Highlights 
of the evening were a toast to employees for a job well 
done, a prime rib dinner and other refreshments, followed 
by entertainment by CTA employees and the "Grand Staff," 
a local band which also provided dance music. 

It was the first time in the history of CTA that so many 
employees have been honored in a single setting. Reddrick 
told the audience, "You can be proud of your enviable 
reputation in the mass transit industry as an innovator and a 
leader in the field. We're proud of you. 

"CTA is one of the very few mass transit properties in 
North America which operates 24 hours a day, seven days a 
week, 52 weeks a year. 

"We enjoy one of the lowest accident frequency rates 
among North American mass transit properties serving 
population centers of over a million people. Since 1981, 
CTA has beaten its own superb safety record by establishing 




Illinois' Lottery spokesman David Green gives thumbs up for a 
special group of winners — those honored because they were 
striving for excellence, as he sits at the piano keyboard in Halas 
Mall. 



Providing music for dancing as well as entertainment is the Grand 
Staff. The popular Chicago band has performed at such events as 
Chicago Fest. 

new low accident frequency rates. 

"Although it is the single-minded goal of all CTA 
employees to provide safe, efficient, dependable transit ser- 
vice to the people of Chicago, it is our operating and station 
employees who most positively contribute to the realization 
of this goal." 

Governor James R. Thompson proclaimed the day "CTA 
Strive for Excellence Day" in recognition of CTA 
employees' special efforts benefitting its riders. The pro- 
clamation was read by State Senator Charles Chew on 
behalf of the governor who could not be present. 

Amalgamated Transit Union Local 241 President John 
Weatherspoon also presented his accolades as he told fellow 
transit workers, "To be honored is one of the highest tributes 
that can be paid to anyone. 

"Your outstanding contributions mark you as truly 
dedicated in the best tradition of transit workers. Your deeds 
speak for you far better than anything we can ever say. You 
are a strong force for progressive, efficient public service. 

"We are grateful to you for the service you have perform- 
ed, and we are proud of this opportunity to honor you for 
your achievements; for there is no doubt that men and 
women of your ability are destined for even greater ac- 
complishments and higher service. Congratulations." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Transportation Department personnel were on hand to greet the 
Striving for Excellence honorees and to distribute their recogni- 
tion award packets as they arrived for the banquet at McCormick 
Place Ha las Mall. 

Reddrick called for a moment of silence in honor of bus 
operators Cecil Wyre, Forest Glen Garage, who died 
August 26, 1983 and Charles Berry, 77th Street Garage, 
who died December 26, 1983. Both men were included 
among CTA honorees as members of the Million Mile Club. 

The late Mr. Wyre was represented at the Striving for Ex- 
cellence testimonial by his son, William. Representing Mr. 
Berry was his widow, Mrs. Dorothy Berry. A memorial page 
in the evening's program noted, "As career public service 
employees, they provided the ultimate in safe transit to the 
people of metropolitan Chicago - a combined total of more 
than 2,000,000 accident free miles of bus operation. — The 
legacy they leave with us will continue to inspire us for many 
years to come." 

Following this observance, guests stood to raise glasses in 
a toast to all of the honorees representing all 10 bus garages, 
rail terminals and ticket agents. The Striving for Excellence 
testimonial was underwritten by the CTA Employee Welfare 
Fund, and each of the bus credit unions, as well as ATU 
Local 241 



Kedzie garage dedication 
set for June 29 

The CTA's new $17.6 million Kedzie bus garage on 
Chicago's West Side will be dedicated on June 29. 

The 321,000 square foot garage is on an 8.2 acre site 
bounded by Kedzie avenue, Jackson boulevard, Van Buren 
street, and Spaulding avenue. It replaces a former garage 
built on the same site in 1910 by the Chicago City Railways 
company, a CTA predecessor. 

The new building has indoor parking for up to 250 buses, 
complete maintenance and parts storage facilities, drive- 
through bus washers and all other functions necessary for 
servicing buses. The facility also has an 80,000 gallon 
underground diesel fuel storage system. Transportation 
Department offices also are in the new garage. 

Personnel and equipment housed in the old garage were 
shifted to other garages in October, 1981, when construc- 
tion started. 



From the Chairman 



Striving for Excellence 



Months ago, the Training and Instruction section 
of CTA Operations began implementing new pro- 
grams designed to help operating employees 
sharpen their skills and improve their performance. 
Gradually at first, then more quickly, their efforts 
began to have a marked effect on our service, as 
employees showed growing concern for their per- 
sonal success and the success of CTA 

During that time, the Bus Roadeo increased in 
popularity, and the Third Rail Roundup became the 
first rail operating employees' competition in the 
transit industry. The Employees Safety/Performance 
Program brought the spirit of friendly competition 
and exemplary performance to our daily operations, 
and programs like the Million Mile Club and Day in 
CTA continued to prosper. By setting new opera- 
tions safety records and treating riders courteously, 
our employees demonstrated that they would settle 
for nothing less than making CTA the nation's best 
transit system. 

Inspiring the many individual accomplishments, 
and uniting employees in a spirit of cooperative im- 
provement, is the Training and Instruction motto 
"Striving for Excellence." More than one thousand 
shared honors on May 12, as CTA recognized its 
most accomplished operating employees at its first 
"Striving for Excellence" Testimonial. My fellow 
Board members and I congratulate all of you for 
distinguishing yourselves through hard work and 
dedication during the past year. We appreciate your 
efforts, and we are delighted that all of you could 
receive public recognition through this testimonial. 

Moreover, I believe that the spirit and ac- 
complishments of "Striving for Excellence" should 
serve as examples for all CTA employees. If each 
employee in every department strives to perform his 
or her job as well as possible, and cooperates with 
other employees to help them reach their full poten- 
tial, we can continue to improve CTA service, 
operate more efficiently, and provide the people of 
Chicago with a transit system that will continue to be 
a source of civic pride for years to come. 



^ 



J&tLeju 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 5 



Commendation Corner 



Frank Buscemi (Forest 
Glen garage) was com- 
mended by Eileen O'Brien, 
of Waveland Avenue, for 
the way he operated a No. 
152 Addison bus. "It was 
the first time in a long time 
that I observed a driver 
who did his job with pride, 
patience and persistence. 
He did not let non-paying 
kids pile on at the back of 
the bus. He persisted until 
those who crowded the 
front of the bus moved to 
the back so that those 
waiting outside could 
board. If all buses were run 
in this manner, the RTA 
would be solvent and 
would regain the respect of 
its riders." 



Corine Glaspie (West Section) was complimented by 
June Berweiler, of North Keystone Avenue, for her per- 
formance as a ticket agent at Irving Park on the Congress- 
Douglas-O'Hare line. "I think she's the nicest employee 
you've got. She's so cheerful! People can be so crabby-- 
so can I — if they've been standing in a long line during 
morning rush. But when you go through her turnstile, 
you forget that when she's on duty. She's the best part of 
the train ride into the Loop. Sometimes she's the best 
part of the day." 

Maria Acevedo (North Section) was praised by 
Kathleen Hynds, of Milwaukee, for her helpfulness as a 
ticket agent at Davis Street in Evanston. "I know very lit- 
tle about Chicago's transit system. Returning from visiting 
a friend at Northwestern University, I had planned to take 
a train into Chicago and back out to Mt. Prospect to meet 
my ride back to Milwaukee, but she rerouted me by bus 
to DesPlaines, where I could catch the train right across 
the street from the end of the line. This saved a lot of 
time, some money, and much aggravation. She really 
saved my night." 

Sefton Williamson (North Park garage) was the 
operator of a No. 22 Clark bus ridden by Marguerite 
Giuntoli, of Sandburg Terrace. "He operated the vehicle 
in a competent, careful and professional manner on a 
day with hazardous road conditions. He approached 
stops slowly and carefully, and brought the bus to the 
curb when possible. With dignity, patience and cheer- 
fulness, he answered everyone's transportation ques- 
tions, and cautioned senior citizens when necessary. It is 
a pleasure to observe such a conscientious public 
servant." 




Albert Moore (North Sec- 
tion) is "an employee of 
whom you should be most 
proud," according to 
Michelle Uhler, who works 
on LaSalle Street. "I was 
privileged to be on his 
(Howard) train. This young 
man obviously takes pride 
in his job. He does not 
merely announce stops, he 
puts a little extra effort 
and care into his job, 
which shows him to be an 
extraordinary employee. It 
is difficult to be cheerful in 
the morning, so it is a 
credit to him that he ob- 
viously goes above and 
beyond the normal job 
demands in the way he 
performs his tasks. My trip 
on his train was 
delightful." 



Willie Turner (77th Street garage) was operating a No. 
14 South Lake Shore Express bus ridden by Drelis Fujah, 
of Jeffery Boulevard, "when the car ahead of the bus 
stopped abruptly because its hood flew up. There was ab- 
solutely no chance to stop the bus, and no way to move 
into another lane because of the heavy traffic. But 
somehow, this alert driver was able to maneuver the bus 
around the car by driving onto the grassy park area off 
the Outer Drive. I believe this driver's quick thinking and 
skillful driving saved lives and avoided serious injuries." 

Joseph Gale (Forest Glen garage) is appreciated by 
Aaron Fields, of South May Street, who was a rider on 
his No. 81 Lawrence bus. "I've been using CTA for 35 
years, and I think he is the most courteous driver I've ever 
had the pleasure of meeting. I notice during inclement 
weather he'll have more patience, especially with the 
elderly or handicapped. I've seen him wait for passengers 
running in the middle of the block. He knows most of his 
regular riders. He greets each one with a smile and 
friendly hello. He's a wonderful employee. I'd recom- 
mend him for 'The Driver of the Year.' 

Philip Buscemi (North Section) was the conductor on 
an Evanston Express train ridden by Jan Quigley, of 
Evanston. "I feel he should be recognized for his con- 
sistently superb job performance and attitude. Not only is 
he extremely careful and efficient in the way he performs 
his responsibilities, but he also deals brilliantly with all 
types of people, and goes out of his way to make sure his 
passengers are content. He makes so many people smile 
or laugh each day-even if it's a lousy day--or the el is 
crowded or delayed. He is a definite asset to your com- 
pany." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Heroics earn 
honors on "A Day 
in CTA" 

The alertness of CTA District "B" 
Supervisor Howard Freeman resulted 
in the recent escape of 12 people from 
a burning building at 5508 South 
Lowe Avenue. 

Freeman was checking for a possi- 
ble reroute when he saw the fire. He 
awakened the building's occupants 
which enabled them to flee to safety. 
Freeman also contacted the control 
center so firemen could be notified. 

His heroic conduct earned him 
special recognition on "A Day in 
CTA." Similarly honored for a life sav- 
ing action was foot collector John Pelt 
whose personal involvement persuad- 
ed a man to get off the tracks at 
Ashland Terminal. Pelt's coaxing is 
believed to have averted death or in- 
jury to the man as well as a serious in- 
terruption to rail service for riders. 

The coveted "Day in CTA" honor 
was also bestowed upon North Rail 
District Supervisor John Gorman, and 
bus operator Joe Fox of Beverly 
Garage. 




Bus Controller Curtis C. McEwen gives "Day in CTA " honorees an overview of service lor 
operating personnel provided by control center personnel. Honorees on tour of the con- 
trol center are (from left) John Gorman, supervisor, North Rail District; John Pelt, foot col- 
lector, South Section; Howard Freeman, supervisor, District B, and Joe Fox, bus operator, 
Beverly Garage. 



Gorman earned the special recogni- 
tion after he notified his superintend- 
ent of the unusual noise coming from 
the rear of a six car train which was 
southbound as it pulled out of the 
Fullerton station. A quick check of the 
last car revealed a broken axle. The 
car was removed from service for 
maintenance. 



Meanwhile, a bus which had been 
stolen from the 77th Street Garage 
was observed unattended in the 9900 
block of South Halsted Street by 
operator Joe Fox as he drove the 8A 
Halsted route. Fox contacted the con- 
trol center which led to the prompt 
recovery of valuable CTA property. 



Thanks for a job well done 

Employees who have received commendations from the public. 



Arvin Austin, North Avenue 

Henry Barker, 69th Street 
Harvey Beale Jr., Limits 
Ivory Beattie, Archer 

Louis Berry, North Avenue 
Rudolph Blakemore, North Avenue 
Charlotte Brent, North Section 
Philip Buscemi, Howard/Kimball 

Witherspoon Carr, 77th Street 
Carlotta Carter, 77th Street 
Ray Carter, Limits 

Bennie Davis, Douglas/Congress 
Javier DeLaRosa, North Park 

Casper Elder Jr., Ashland 
Virginia Enriquez, Archer 
James Estes, Forest Glen 

Kenneth Freeman, North Section 

Gerardo Gonzalez, Limits 
Wallacene Good, Forest Glen 
Albert Grady, 77th Street 
George Grafer, Forest Glen 
William Gross, North Avenue 



Eldred Hall, North Park 
Lawrence Hart, North Avenue 
Cornelius Haywood, Limits 
Rosemary Hoskins, North Park 
George Hudson Jr., 77th Street 
Joe Hunter, 69th Street 

Rosa Irizarry, Forest Glen 

Willie James, North Park 
Arthur James Jr., Forest Glen 
Walter Jentsch, North Park 
Eddie Johnson, 77th Street 
Edward Jolley, 77th Street 
Bernardino Juarez, Limits 

Robert Kremer, North Park 

Nathaniel Lee Jr., Ashland 

Valray Mcintosh, 77th Street 
Luis Montalvo, North Park 
Timothy Mulvey, Beverly 

Chester Olenski, North Park 

Juan Paladines, Archer 
Demetrel Parker, 69th Street 



Daniel Pate, Beverly 
Frederick Pepke, Limits 
Eduardo Pescatore, Forest Glen 
Alvin Polowczyk, Forest Glen 

Billy Ragsdale, 77th Street 
Annie Rice, Limits 
Peggy Robinson, Archer 
Oilie Rodgers Jr., Beverly 

Yakup Sabanoff, North Park 

William Sanders, Archer 

Edwin Serrano, West Section 

Verleen Smith, Archer 

Terry Smoczynski, Forest Glen 

Frank Staszak, Limits 

Angelo Sturino, Howard/Kimball 

William Suggs, Douglas/Congress 

Ceola Williams, Archer 
Abner Williams Jr., Limits 
Gerald Williams, South Section 

Kazimer Yaworski, Forest Glen 
Jacques Yezeguielian, North Avenue 
Charles Young, Jefferson Park 

Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



7984 Vol. 37-No. 5 



Culture bus 
visits printer's row 
on west route 



CTA's Culture Bus has long been 
known for the educational, 
economical, and convenient service it 
offers to our city's major cultural at- 
tractions. Now the Culture Bus can 
take credit for bringing into public view 
an exhibit that's sure to interest a wide 
range of Culture Bus riders. 

Dorothy Martin, of Old Town, was 
riding the Culture Bus not long ago 
when she noticed in the literature that 
West Route buses stopped at the 
Printers Row Museum. This was the 



'HE CORDON MARIINl'O 

Or USTS A. 1S33 CEI 

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Printers Row Museum volunteer Pam Brown 
shows Dorothy Martin samples of the metal 
letters kept in a California type case for use in 
printing orders on hand-set presses, following 
a practice that dates back to Gutenberg. 

first she knew of the museum, and she 
couldn't wait to see it. 

Mrs. Martin's late husband, Gor- 
don, was an illustrator and 
typographer. He taught visual educa- 
tion, design and typography at the 
Illinois Institute of Technology, and 
even started a fine printing business of 
his own. 

When he died in 1970, he left 
behind a collection of several dozen 
posters and playbills from the 18th and 
19th Centuries, including a number of 
advertising excursions by rail and 
steamship from Chicago. 

"It was just like coming home," Mrs. 
Martin said of her first look inside the 




Viewing some pf the 44 posters, playbills and newspaper front pages on display at the 
Printers Row Museum, 715 S. Dearborn, are Pam Brown (left), a volunteer guide, and 
Dorothy Martin, whose late husband assembled the collection. 



museum, at 715 South Dearborn, in 
the Printers Row district. "I had been 
looking for years for an appropriate 
place to display Gordon's collection, 
and right away I knew this was it." 

The museum is filled with century- 
old hand presses, linotype machines, 
and other antique printing equipment. 
The equipment is maintained by 
volunteers, who use it to print custom 
orders for cards, stationary, posters, 
and other specialized items. 

The museum was established by Les 
Feller, a food scientist with a major 
corporation, who obtained the 



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Pam Brown (left) and Dorothy Martin view 
some of the 19th Century posters from the 
Gordon Martin collection that were used to 
advertise transportation by rail or ship to 
points around Chicago. 



storefront space to house his fast- 
growing collection of printing equip- 
ment four years ago. 

The neighborhood surrounding the 
museum was once the center of 
Chicago's printing industry, and got its 
biggest boost from the mail order 
houses that sprang up after the Fire of 
1871. The mail order catalogs re- 
quired a steady production of advertis- 
ing artwork that kept printers busy. 

Today this South Loop area has 
undergone a rebirth, with the 
establishment of the residential com- 
munity of Dearborn Park on rail yards 
that once led into Dearborn Station, 
and the conversion of a number of loft 
buildings and printing plants into rental 
and condominium apartment com- 
plexes. 

The century-old Dearborn Station 
itself has been preserved as the focal 
point of the district, while new 
restaurants and pubs have opened to 
serve the urban pioneers again settling 
in the area. 

The Printers Row Museum stands as 
one of the few living links to the past, 
and to the traditions that made prin- 
ting one of Chicago's greatest in- 
dustries. Open from 10 a.m. to 3:30 
p.m. on Sundays; 10 to 4 Tuesday 
through Friday; and 9 to 5 on Satur- 
days, the Printers Row Museum is free 
to the public, and is the next stop after 
Chinatown on the West Culture bus 
Route. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Tommie , salutes 
red, white, and blue 



"The procedure is this, " Mrs. Marjorie Holmes gestures as she explains to potential CTA 
vendors seeking information on CTA business contracts from the Affirmative Action 
Department manager, and CTA Materials Management staff. Shown with Holmes are 
Materials Management's Olivia Bradley and James Vesely, procurement analysts. 



CTA represented 
at business 
opportunity fair 



Members of CTA's Affirmative Ac- 
tion Department and Materials 
Management combined efforts as par- 
ticipants in the recent 17th annual 
Chicago Business Opportunity Fair. 

The fair, sponsored by the Chicago 
Regional Purchasing Council, provid- 
ed an occasion for CTA and vendors 
of goods and services to meet and ex- 
change needs and capabilities. More 
than 50 minority companies exhibited 
their products and services and receiv- 
ed information on the procedures for 
conducting business with CTA. 

Providing information on CTA pro- 
cedure for vendors wishing to par- 
ticipate in the bidding process were 
Marjorie Holmes, manager, Affir- 
mative Action; Carol Hardy, minority 
enterprise clerk; Loyce Ellis and 
James Hill, minority enterprise 
specialists; Olivia Bradley, James 
Vesely, and Eugene Fregetto, pro- 
curement analysts, and Edna 
Southworth, buyer. 

Mrs. Holmes said Affirmative Ac- 
tion's primary MBE role is to identify 
minority business through the certifica- 
tion process which may include a desk 
audit, or an on-sight visit. 



CTA employee 
earns YWCA 
appreciation 




Juanita Duff, Equipment Engineer- 
ing and Maintenance training coor- 
dinator, was presented the YWCA 
Certificate of Appreciation May 8 for 
outstanding volunteer service to the 
Loop Center YWCA during 1983-84. 

The presentation was made on the 
occasion of the 107th annual meeting 
of the Metropolitan Chicago YWCA. 
Ms. Duff, a member of the YWCA 
Speaker's Bureau, has addressed 
religious, professional and medical 
groups upon request on the subject of 
rape awareness and prevention. 

The 16-year CTA veteran has been 
an advocate of the YWCA's Rape and 
Assault Volunteer help program since 
1981. 




Tomoko (Tommie) Smart sported a 
red, white, and blue ribboned corsage 
on the red jacket she wore over her 
white blouse which was tucked into 
her blue skirt. 

She topped off her patriotic outfit 
with red, white, and blue earrings and 
a big smile because the date was 
May 31. "This is an important day for 
me, probably the most important date 
in the whole year," Ms. Smart an- 
nounced. 

"May 31 is the day I first entered the 
United States as a war bride 25 years 
ago. I was born in Yokahama, Japan 
and I attended a Catholic high school 
there where I learned English. I also 
learned key punch and got a job at a 
U.S. Army base," she said. 

She married an American G.I. and 
on May 31 arrived in the United 
States, the occasion of her yearly 
observances. 

Ms. Smart lives on the far southwest 
side and has a son, Michael, 23, a 
laboratory technician, and a daughter, 
Michelle, 22, a lithographic produc- 
tion assistant. 

Ms. Smart is a position control 
analyst in the Budget Department 
where friends and co-workers gave 
her a surprise anniversary party on 
May 31 in honor of the 25th anniver- 
sary of "her" day. 

Later, her children had a backyard 
barbeque for her and 40 neighbors 
and friends. 

She said she has returned to visit 
her family in Japan many times but, 
she grinned. "It's always great coming 
home. 

"I'm very happy being an American. 
There's nothing more to say than 
that." 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 5 




Outlaws take championship, finish 



Exhilaration was high as general of- 
fice fans left Washington Park 
Fieldhouse May 18 after witnessing 
the Outlaws taking the 1984 Cham- 
pionship for CTA's basketball league. 

The undefeated General Office 
Outlaws had stopped the 1983 de- 
fending champions, the Limits Lakers, 
67-60. The near-squeeker victory 
came in a three-minute overtime 
period as both teams aggressively 
demonstrated a shootout in a fast- 
paced, well-played game which was 
full of excitement from the first whistle 
to the final buzzer. 

The defending Lakers, led by the 
scoring trio of Anthony Coleman, 19 
points, Eugene Tate, 12 points, and 



Rick James, 11 points, made a good 
showing by forcing the game into 
overtime, but the northsiders were no 
match for the downtown cagers who 
came to play, and got down to serious 
business early in the game with their 
own scoring machine. 

High point scorer John Harvey led 
the Outlaws with 15 points. The 
playmakerking, guard Michael Ewing, 
followed with 14 points while team- 
mates Carl King and Bob Jenkins sunk 
12 and 10 points respectively. 

Finishing third for the season was 
Blue Thunder, coached by Will 
Williams of 77th Street. Thunder 
defeated the fourth place 77th Street 
Streakers 67-61. Virtually a rainbow 



squad, Blue Thunder was organized 
after the 1984 league started, and was 
comprised of personnel from various 
CTA locations. 

"We were just beginning to get it 
together when the season ended," 
said Williams. "We could have used 
about three more games, although we 
did play the full complement of 16 
games by making up the ones we 
missed near the end of the season." 

Williams said the backbone of his 
team was guards Tevell Simpson, Ter- 
mite Carlton, Joe Milbrook, and 
Russell Williams. "We look forward to 
next season when we try for all of it," 
said Willams. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 






ison undefeated 



n easy two points for Outlaw Bob Jenkins (7). Rushing up court is 
g (22). 

akers' Eugene Tate (20) is unable to stop the scoring as Joe 

i lays up two points for the General Office Outlaws. Looking down 

Bob Jenkins (7) of the Outlaws, and Wade Jones (12) of the Lakers 

jnes takes the offensive for the Lakers as he is challenged by 
Reggie Williams (23), and Bob Jenkins (7). 

amble for the ball included Outlaws John Harvey (30), Morris 
1), Carl King (22), and Lakers Eugene Tate (20), Rick James (44), 
hony Coleman (35). 

Ewing (5) of the Outlaws, and Wade Jones (35) of the Lakers, two 
est guards in the league, go one on one in the championship berth 

' Lambert (left) of 77th Street drives the ball down court as Blue 
' opponent Odell Reed, backed by teammate Tevell Simpson, at- 
to check him. Back court action includes Wallace Howard (left), 
nardo Coleman, of 77th Street. 

i the pressure on are Outlaws Sam Miller (6), and Reggie Williams 
\nthony Coleman of the Lakers goes airborne in his attempt for a 




1984 Vol. 37-No. 5 



First Quarter 

Public Safety Awards 

Public Safety Awards for the first 
quarter of 1984 were presented to 
61st Street Terminal and Archer 
Garage. 

61st Street experienced only one 
accident and registered 90 acccident 
free days while climbing from fifth 
place at the end of the fourth quarter 
of 1983 to the top in the first quarter of 
1984. The last award won by 61st 
Street was for the third quarter of 
1977. 

Archer Garage, which has over 500 
operators, has won this award 12 
times since the inception of the awards 
in 1961. The last award presented Ar- 
cher was for the second quarter of 
1981. 

In winning the award this time, Ar- 
cher Garage experienced 30 accident 
free days and a passenger rate of 0.71 
accidents for every 100,000 miles of 
operation. This rate was 42 percent 
better than the bus system rate of 1.2. 



Cecala Jr. 

is named Man of Year 

Holy Cross 
High School, 
River Grove, has 
named senior 
Joseph J. Cecala, 
Jr. its 1984 
"Man of the 
Year." He is the 
son of Joseph J. 
Cecala, Sr., supervisor of Operations 
Review, Finance. 

Young Cecala is president of the 
student council, and has been active in 
a variety of academic and extracur- 
ricular activities since his freshman 
year at Holy Cross. 

An honor student, he is a member 
of the National Honor Society, and 
the Letterman's Club. He is also the 
recipient of the National Catholic 
Bandmasters Association Honors 
Band award, winner of the Fleet 
Reserve Association Essay contest, 
and a winner of the American Legion 
Scholarship award. 

Cecala plans to attend Loyola 
University where he hopes to major in 
accounting, and ultimately to become 
an attorney. 





Earning the first quarter Public Safety Award at 61st Street Terminal brought congratula- 
tions from Ardis Morris (left), superintendent, 95th Street Terminal. Morris is shown 
greeting David Curry, assistant superintendent, 61st Street, and Jim McClain, superinten- 
dent, 61st Street Terminal. The coveted plaque was presented by Fred Mead (right), direc- 
tor, System Safety Analysis/Performance. 




Archer Garage Superintendent Joseph Stein bach (right), proudly accepts the first quarter 
1984 Public Safety plaque from Tom Boyle, manager. Safety, during awards program at 
the garage. Some employees also earned door prizes. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Motorman in Mr. Prairie State contest 




Flexing his muscles, Quentin Michalezewski demonstrates three poses which he used 
in the "Mr. Prairie State" body building competition. Judges saw his front abdominal 
form (top left), followed by double biceps (right), and the thinking man's pose (lower left). 



When westside motorman Quentin 
Michalezewski was first attracted to body 
building six years ago it didn't seem possi- 
ble that he would be in competition for a 
trophy someday. 

On May 5, however. Quentin took fifth 
place in his first contest, the "Mr. Prairie 
State" competition at Wheaton/Warren- 
ville Middle School where he was one of 
30 contestants in the over 35 and under 40 
category. 

His interest in body building was piqued 
after he read a magazine on the subject. "I 
wanted to meet Samir Bannout who was 
featured in the magazine, so I went to the 
west coast where not only did we meet, but 
he taught me proper body building techni- 
ques and all about diet, which plays a very 
important part in body building," said 
Quentin. Bannout, regarded on the west 
coast, as "The Lion of Lebanon," reigns as 
"Mr. Olympia," Quentin said. 

Another of his mentors in contest 
preparation was John Gust, the current 
"Mr. Illinois," who Quentin said spent five 
months teaching him the correct body 
poses. 

Because of his placement in the "Mr. 
Prairie State" contest, Quentin is eligible to 
compete in the November 3 "Mr. Illinois" 
contest. He said he plans to enter in the 
over 40 category. 

A CTA employee since May 23, 1973, 
Quentin previously worked in public 
affairs, accounting and the student riding 
card section. 




Larry Bernstein (left), "Mr. America" in his weight class, presents 
Michalezewski (lower right) with the fifth place runner up trophy. 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 5 



11 




Five locations earn first place certificates 




Retiring Nick Simonetti (far left), unit supervisor, Bus Shops Unit Rebuild section, can be proud of leaving a first place maintenance safety 
team for the next supervisor. Simonetti and his team pause for the photographer after the unit's first quarter 1984 Zero Accident Program 
achievement. 





Maintenance personnel at 98th Street terminal continue to be com- 
petitive in the Zero Accident Program as demonstrated by this first 
place certificate held by car repairer Al Curtis. Rail Terminals 
Superintendent Richard Lorimer shares the moment. Their previous 
first place certificate was earned in the third quarter of 1983. 



First place winner among bus garage maintenance personnel was 
Forest Glen. Jim Ward (left), day foreman, accepts the coveted cer- 
tificate from Terry McGuigan, director, Bus Maintenance. It was the 
second consecutive honor in the maintenance safety program for 
Forest Glen which shared in the six-month lowest accident catered 
luncheon for its personnel in the fourth quarter of 1983. 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



CTA maintenance personnel at five locations were winners in the first quarter 

1984 Zero Accident Program competition. Certificates of honor were awarded 

to the 77th Street Bus Shops, Skokie Rail Shops, Forest Glen Garage, and 

Kimball and 98th Street Terminals. 

Winners in the Bus Shops competition included the Body, Paint, Upholstery, 

and Convertor Shops, Shop Service. Electrical Units Rebuild, and the 

Machine, Radiator and Print Shops. 

Skokie Shops winners were Motor Line, Vehicle Wiring, Blacksmith/Welding, 

Machine and Truck Shops, and the Degreasing section. 





Car repairer Robert Calhoun of 98th Street Terminal makes ad- 
justments to electrical components. Safety equipment, such as 
the bump hat which Calhoun wears, is second nature to 
repairmen and other maintenance personnel. 



Superintendent, Rail Terminals Michael Vasquez (left), and Kim- 
ball day foreman Johnny Henderson were also among the happy 
recipients of first place ZA P certificates. 





Mark Dundovich (left), Rail Shops unit supervisor, and foreman 
Jim House, share the pride in the section's ZAP award presented 
by Safety Supervisor James Dudley (right). 



Check and double check is the key element here as demonstrated 
by Jeff Jurczyk, a safety conscious car repairer at Kimball. 



1984 Vol. 37-No. 5 



13 



Six employees and 210 years of service 




Dick Schneider, Equipment Engineering and Maintenance (third from left), enjoys a mo- 
ment with five South Shops personnel planning retirement beginning June 1. They are 
(from left) George Drey, Frank May, Nick Simonetti, Jerome Pavel, and Daniel Murphy. 



A unit supervisor, two foremen, a 
carpenter leader and two mechanics 
with a collective total of 210 years 
CTA service, and an average of 35 
years each, are bidding adieu to daily 
routine at South Shops June 1 as they 
take their pensions. 

Heading the list with 43 years service 
each are Frank May, foreman, Brake 
department; and Nick Simonetti, unit 
supervisor, Unit Rebuild section. 
Others are George Drey, carpenter 
leader, 34 years; Jerome Pavel, 
foreman, Bus Overhaul section, 30 
years; and bus and truck mechanics 
Daniel Murphy and Grady Mattison, 35 
and 25 years respectively. 

Simonetti said the most significant 
change which he and his co-workers 
have witnessed over the last 43 years 
was the transition from street cars to 
buses, and the consolidation of the 
various transportation services 
operating in Chicago. 

"CTA is a good place to spend your 
life," said Drey, who added, "It can 
give you financial rapport which gives 



you respect among creditors, and 
allows you to properly care for your 
family." 

Frank May said he started with CTA 
at 48 cents an hour when the old 
horse barn was still standing, although 
it was only a relic. May said when he 
joined the CTA's predecessor, 
Chicago Surface Lines, his father ad- 
vised him, "If you keep your mouth 
shut, and your ears and eyes open 
you will be all right. It was good 
advice," said May. 

May who was a scouter for more 
than 30 years, is a little league and 
park district umpire in his south subur- 
ban community of Alsip where he 
plans to continue active in youth pro- 
grams he said, "As long as the Lord 
will let me." 

Nick Simonetti, a sculptor, will con- 
tinue making figurines, and will spend 
the winters in Indian Shores, Fla., and 
the summers in Chicago. Jerry Pavel 
plans to enjoy the leisure of his 
Wisconsin summer cottage and his 
Chicago home. 



Conservation project 
earns first prize 

Jerry Johnson, the 14-year old son 
of Treasury utility clerk Judy Stroud, 
took first place honors in the recent 
Carver high school science fair. 

Judges were awed by the Carver 
freshman's conservation project which 
examines the affects of microbes on 
decomposed garbage. The youth's 
award winning scientific experiment 
began while he was an eighth grade 
student at the Metcalf Magnet school 
last year. 

Johnson's conservation project also 
received excellent marks at the district 
level science fair held at the Chicago 
State University in March, and an 
honorable mention at the city level for 
which he received a certificate of 
achievement. 

He plans to continue experimenting 
with the project throughout his high 
school career in an effort to improve it, 
his mother said. 



Congratulations from 
one scouter to another 

Dear Sir: 

Thank you very much for sending 
me the CTA Transit News. I ap- 
preciated it very much, like to keep up 
with the news. 

The article on page 16 about Walter 
Lemons Jr. being in scouting since 
1948, and receiving the Silver Beaver 
Award: I want to give him credit for 
the wonderful job he has done for 
scouting. 

Just to let you know that you have 
another scouter that worked for you 
years ago. 

1 have been in Scouting since 1915, 
this is my sixty ninth year in Scouting, 
also received the Silver Beaver Award 
on May 25, 1978. 

Have been retired since December 
1, 1959, still going strong. 

Yours sincerely, 

William Boggs Sr. (08874) 
514 N. Randolph St. 
Princeton, IL 61356 
Vice-Chairman, 
Advancement Committee, 
including Board of Review 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Service anniversaries 
in May 

35 Years _——^— 



Paul Ventlclnquc, Equip. Engr./Maint. 



30 Years i 



Frank Hubbard, Adm. Services 
Otis Hynson, Schedules 
William Moore, Near South 
Andrew Mosley, Information Srvcs. 
Andrew Windham, 77th Street 
Gus Wright, Beverly 



25 Years i 



Bruce Anderson, Rail Service 
Robert Armstrong, Douglas/Congress 
Robert Austin, Lawndale 
Adello Bianchini, Howard/Kimball 
Robert Cano Jr., Douglas/Congress 
Odessa Danielley, South Section 
Peter Dolan, North Park 
Steve Econom, Archer 
John Grayer, Far South 
William Haase. Rail Dist. West 
Nicholas Lambrakos, Archer 
Grady Mattison, South Shops 
James McCurtis, Forest Park 
Roy McGrath, Bus Service 
William Miller, Lawndale 
Bernard Moore, Fac. Engr./Maint 
Edward Panik, Near North 
Levell Stewart, South Shops 
Jay Thompson, 69th Street 
Eddie Tinsley, Schedules 
Myron Woods, Rail Instruction 



New Pensioners 

RAYMOND BRENNAN, Bus Operator, 

North Avenue. Emp. 6-7-54 
ROBERT BUERGER. Carpenter Foreman. 

Skokie Shop. Emp. 11-10-41 
CHARLES COLE. Bus Operator, 

77th Street. Emp. 3-4-57 
THOMAS COOGAN. Bus Operator. 

Archer, Emp. 11-25-57 
WILLIAM DANIELS. Ticket Agent. 

South Section. Emp. 9-24-52 
•JOHN ECKEL. Sr. Tab Mach. Oper , 

Datacenter, Emp 7-23-53 
LLOYD FERDINAND. Bus Operator, 

Archer. Emp. 6-3-46 
DEWEY HILL, Motorman. 

61st Street, Emp. 4-10-52 
MELVIN JONES, Motorman, 

South Section, Emp. 6-25-51 
JINDRICH MULLER, Laborer. 

Skokie Shop. Emp. 5-22-68 
ROBERT O'NEAL, Bus Operator, 

Lawndale. Emp. 8-5-57 
JOHN REBACZ. Tool Fire Blksmth . 

West Shops. Emp 1-21-65 
BENJAMIN SECLER, Bus Operator. 

North Park. Emp. 2-12-52 
ARTHUR SMITH. Motorman, 

South Section, Emp. 3-16-59 
WILLIE STEVENS, Bus Operator. 

Lawndale. Emp. 8-12-52 
THOMAS STOUT, "B" Helper, 

West Shops. Emp 11-26-62 
THEODORE SZYMANSKI, Frmn Elec.Wrkr. 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 5-7-47 
JOHN WEALER, Bus Supervisor, 

District D, Emp. 3-18-54 



ROY WILLIAMS. Elec. Sig Maint. Speclst.. 

West Shops. Emp. 4-17-50 
GEORGE WYLIE, Unit Supervisor. 

Skokie Shop. Emp. 5-22-68 

Disability Retirements 

HARTWELL ONSTOTT, Bus Operator. 

North Avenue, Emp 12-5-60 
•EMILE OUSLEY Jr.. Lineman. 
West Shops, Emp. 9-23-71 

'Retroactive to 3-1-84 
'Retroactive to 4- 1-84 



Tisr 3VEE]3vnoR.i^.iva: 



CHARLES ADAMS, 85, 77th Street, 

Emp. 11-26-19, Died 3-25-84 
ALVAR ALSTERLUND, 73, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 3-31-47, Died 3-28-84 
WALTER BANICKI. 74, Elec. Maint., 

Emp. 8-12-43, Died 4-7-84 
LAWRENCE BROOKHOUZEN, 94, Transp., 

Emp. 12-3-15, Died 3-15-84 
ROBERT BROWNE, 77. West Section, 

Emp. 10-29-43. Died 3-24-84 
WILLIAM BURBATT. 61. Beverly. 

Emp. 2-16-46. Died 3-16-84 
PATRICK CANNON, 73. Stores, 

Emp. 1-23-43. Died 4-4-84 
LUTHER CARR. 75, 61st Street, 

Emp. 10-16-47, Died 4-9-84 
GLORIA CARSON, 43, South Section, 

Emp. 3-6-74. Died 4-4-84 
MICHAEL CARUSO, 71, South Section. 

Emp. 8-29-45. Died 4-10-84 
RAY CATLIN. 83, Howard. 

Emp. 8-26-24. Died 4-13-84 
HARRY CASS1DY, 94. Devon, 

Emp 12-23-19. Died 4-10-84 
JAMES CAWLEY, 68. North Park, 

Emp. 3-13-43, Died 4-8-84 
JOSEPH CHRISTOI, 74. Maintenance, 

Emp 8-20-29. Died 4-24-84 
RAYMOND DYLE, 78. 77th Street, 

Emp. 3-31-44. Died 4-18-84 
FRANK FISCHER. 81, Forest Glen. 

Emp. 8-18-42, Died 3-26-84 
BERNARD FITZPATRICK, 61, Mat. Mgmt., 

Emp. 1-8-47. Died 3-18-84 
JOHN GALVIN. 71, North Avenue, 

Emp. 5-31-51, Died 3-14-84 
FRED GIBBS. 67, Beverly, 

Emp 12-20-54, Died 3-26-84 
BENJAMIN GULLY, 69, 77th Street, 

Emp. 10-16-45, Died 4-24-84 
HANS HABBESTAD, 79, North Avenue. 

Emp. 10-31-29, Died 4-6-84 
ELBERT HAMBRICK, 82, 77th Street. 

Emp. 8-30-26, Died 4-19-84 
ISHAM HANDLEY, 67, Archer, 

Emp. 6-11-59, Died 2-27-84 
PATRICK HARRISON, 75, Stores. 

Emp 7-27-59. Died 2-22-84 
JOHN HEAVEY, 86. 69th Street, 

Emp 3-31-24. Died 4-7-84 
ASTRID HEDBERG, 76, Asst. Sec'y Board, 

Emp. 12-15-36. Died 3-12-84 
FRED HUSTON, 82, North Section. 

Emp 12-11-23. Died 3-23-84 
ARTHUR tTTER. 87. North Park. 

Emp. 5-21-22. Died 3-10-84 
MICHAEL KILCOMMONS. 69, West Shops. 

Emp. 12-14-70, Died 4-17-84 
FRANK KIZIOR. 77. Lawndale, 

Emp 12-26-36. Died 4-1-84 
CHARLES KROENER, 67, South Shops. 

Emp 3-9-72. Died 3-20-84 



EDWIN KRUCKOW, 80, Transportation. 

Emp. 4-10-42. Died 4-10-84 
OSCAR LE1DING, 89. Gen Acctg . 

Emp. 8-23-23, Died 4-10-84 
MARTIN LUDOLPH, 74. North Park. 

Emp. 5-31 46, Died 3-23-84 
ANTHONY LULLO. 72. South Shops, 

Emp. 7-15-47, Died 3-22-84 
MARY LYONS, 77, West Section, 

Emp. 10-22-25. Died 3-3-84 
HEULON MACKEY. 56. Transportation, 

Emp. 7-30-52. Died 4-26-84 
FRANCIS MAGUIRE. 72. Mat Mgmt . 

Emp. 5-22-50. Died 3-30-84 
WILLIAM MAHONEY. 82. West Section. 

Emp. 1-27-26, Died 3-12-84 
KATIE MALONEY. 92, North Section, 

Emp. 4-16-31, Died 3-12-84 
PETER MARONCELLI, 59, Forest Park, 

Emp. 7-23-48, Died 3-31-84 
THOMAS McGRATH. 83, Stores, 

Emp. 6-7-43. Died 3-19-84 
STEWART MclNTYRE, 83, Beverly. 

Emp 11-8-26, Died 3-16-84 
WESLEY MORRIS, 60, North Avenue. 

Emp. 3-4-57. Died 3-12 84 
ARTHUR MUIR, 82. North Park, 

Emp. 9-13-29. Died 4-19-84 
ANTHONY MULLEN. 73. Transportation, 

Emp 9-28-35, Died 4-6-84 
MAX NETZEL, 69. Rail Veh. Maint.. 

Emp. 8-6-53. Died 2-28-84 
JOSEPH NOLAN. 78, Lawndale. 

Emp. 8-17-37. Died 3-30-84 
JAMES O'BRIEN. 84. North Section, 

Emp. 5-7-23, Died 3-15-84 
PATRICK O'DONNELL. 86. Kedzie. 

Emp 7-24-22. Died 3-11-84 
CHARLES PAXTON. 89. Electrical, 

Emp. 6-29-21. Died 4-11-84 
CARL PERSON, 65, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 10-23-45. Died 4-24-84 
OSCAR PETERSON, 91, West Section. 

Emp. 5-7-19. Died 3-11-84 
VINCENT PRINSKI, 85. South Section, 

Emp. 6-26-44, Died 3-18-84 
WILLIAM PROKOP, 75. Beverly. 

Emp 9-20-43. Died 4-27-84 
LAWRENCE PROVOST. 74. Transportation. 

Emp 3-23-42. Died 3-5-84 
THEODORE RAPEY. 69. North Avenue. 

Emp. 9-17-42, Died 4-12-84 
HELEN RICHARD. 42, 52nd Street. 

Emp. 6-23-77. Died 2-13-84 
ED1LBERTO RUIZ. 31. Archer, 

Emp. 6-12-75. Died 4-6-84 
HERBERT SCHMIDT. 73, Forest Glen. 

Emp. 2-10-44. Died 3-27-84 
LILLIAN SCOTT. 87, West Section. 

Emp. 10-2-44, Died 2-26-84 
ALOIS SIKORA. 83, North Section. 

Emp. 9-16-18. Died 4-30-84 
JOHN SKOFF, 89. Lawndale. 

Emp 3-9-37. Died 4-9-84 
EDWARD SOMERS. 82. Claims. 

Emp 6-1-25, Died 3-1-84 
CHARLES STARR, 83. Transportation. 

Emp 10-4-21, Died 3-21-84 
CHESTER STEBE, 65. Madison /Wabash. 

Emp 10-5-67, Died 4-13-84 
JOHN STOPA. 88. North Park. 

Emp 10-25-16. Died 3-14-84 
HENRY STUVEE. 66. South Shops, 

Emp 8-6-36, Died 3-1-84 
LOUIS SUCHOR. 77. Shops & Equip . 

Emp. 3- 3-47, Died 4-6-84 
SIGMUND WODARCZYK. 72, 69th Street. 

Emp 4-1-42. Died 4-1-84 
FRANK ZAMPETTI. 64. Des Plaines. 

Emp 2-18-46. Died 5-17-84 



7984 Vol. 37-No. 5 



75 



Just a 
reminder 



The photos on this page are just a 
few examples taken from stories about 
employees and retirees that have ap- 
peared in recent issues of Transit 
News. All of the stories were sug- 
gested by employees and retirees or 
their friends and coworkers. 

Transit News is your magazine, and 
we would like to print your story, too. 
If you or an employee or retiree that 
you know do interesting community 
work or have an interesting hobby or 
talent, or if you think that a project or 
function of your department would be 
of interest to other employees and 
retirees, send a brief explanation of 
your story idea to: 

Rick Willis, Editor 

Transit News 

CTA Public Affairs 

Room 734 

Merchandise Mart Plaza 

Chicago, Illinois 60654 

or phone: 664-7200, ext. 3324 

Please include a telephone number 
where we can call you during business 
hours (8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.). We will 
assign a writer and a photographer to 
cover your story idea if it is selected for 
publication, or we will use your photos 
if they meet technical reproduction re- 
quirements. 




Solo racing, 11-12. 1983 




Marathons. 1, 1984 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume37 Number5 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 

Editor: Rick Willis 

Graphic Designer: Alexandra Eiva 

Contributing Writers: Robert A. Gaines. 
Jeff Stern. Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555. Chicago, Il- 
linois 60654. 



Wheelchair champions, 11-12, 1983 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT NO. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 




/ 

1984 Volume 37 - Numbers 6 & 7 

Transit News 



New Kedzie garage opens 



CTA buses serving nine major West 
Side bus routes returned to one of 
Chicago's oldest surface transit 
operating locations on June 29 The 
inconvenience of nearly three years of 
temporary operation out of Lawndale 
garage was quickly forgotten, because 
the old Kedzie carhouse, built in 1910, 
had been replaced by the first new bus 
garage built by CTA in almost 30 
years. 

CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 
officially opened the $17.6-million. 



321,000-square-foot facility, located 
on 8.2 acres bounded by Kedzie 
avenue, Jackson boulevard. Van 
Buren street, and Spaulding avenue. 
Urban Mass Transportation Ad- 
ministrator Ralph L. Stanley and other 
goverment officials and community 
leaders joined in the celebration. 

"This is the most modern, energy 
efficient, cost effective, state of the art 
bus garage/maintenance facility in the 
country," Chairman Cardilli said. "We 
are now able to park 250 buses inside 






during sub-zero weather, negating the 
need to keep diesel engines running all 
night to ensure smooth morning rush 
hours. This indoor parking increases 
the service life of buses, and saves 
thousands of dollars." 

While indoor parking is the most im- 
portant operating advantage of the 
new Kedzie garage, every design 
feature shows concern for efficiency 
and conservation of energy and 
material. 

continued on page 2 




Tradition continues . 



Employees gathered outside Kedzie 
garage early on the morning ol opening 
day, June 29, 1984, as CTA retiree Thomas 
O'Connor raised the flag for the first time. 
O'Connor retired from Lawndale garage in 
January 1982, while the new Kedzie 
garage was under construction, after 
almost 36 years of service. O'Connor, who 
always raised the flag at the old Kedzie 
garage, is now DuPage area commander 
of the American Legion. 




Kedzie garage 



continued from page 1 

All buses enter and leave the garage 
through 10 large doors on Kedzie 
avenue, and all interior bus 
movements are made by left-hand 
turns with no backing required. 

Buses entering the garage from 
Kedzie avenue for daily service are 
driven straight to five service lanes 
with provisions for currency removal, 
diesel fuel, motor oil, interior cleaning, 
and refuse collection. A closed system 
carries refuse to an industrial trash 
compactor/closed container, and cur- 
rency removal is monitored by closed- 
circuit video cameras. 

After servicing, buses continue 
straight on to three automatic drive- 
through bus washers that clean the 
front, rear, sides and roof and spray 
the chassis. The washers feature 65 
per cent water reclamation. Clean 
buses may bypass the washers on 
either side. 

A left turn leads to two bus parking 
bays with a total capacity of 250 buses. 
Buses requiring maintenance other 
than daily service are moved from the 
parking bays to the maintenance area 
in the north end of the building. 

The maintenance area is also a 
model of efficiency. Fourteen bus 



hoists are capable of serving standard 
length or articulated buses. These in- 
clude nine general service and repair 
units, two engine wash units, a tire 
unit, an inspection unit, and an in- 
spection and repair unit. Four vehicle 
maintenance pits, each 140 feet long, 
can accommodate up to 12 standard 
buses or 8 articulated buses. 

Oil and other miscellaneous service 
products are stored in nine 
6,000-gallon vertical storage tanks in a 
separate storage area inside the south 
end of the building. An overhead 




Nicholas Janich (Irom left), Del E. Webb 
project superintendent, Bill Toomey, CTA 
garage foreman, and F. H. Petzold, CTA 
project manager, discuss use of equip- 
ment at one of the bus service lanes. 



distribution system pumps oil and 
other chemicals direct to each 
maintenance location for easy dispen- 
sing. Diesel fuel is stored in five 
20,000-gallon underground tanks out- 
side of the south wall of the building. 

Complete, modern transportation 
offices are decorated in a pleasing 
blend of muted and brilliant colors, 
and the drivers' area features open 
space, a high ceiling design, and a 
blend of natural and artificial lighting. 
There is also a convenient area where 
the public may purchase monthly 
passes and tokens. 

The design of Kedzie garage also 
shows concern for environmental 
quality and energy conservation. The 
thoroughly insulated building features 
such modern innovations as a forced 
air ventilation system that recovers 
heat from exhaust air, an automatic 
light dimming system that selectively 
dims interior lighting when natural 
light is available, and two under- 
ground oil/water separators that in- 
tercept all drainage from the garage 
floor and the outdoor product delivery 
location. 

Architecturally, the Kedzie garage is 
a good neighbor. Indoor bus parking 
minimizes air and noise pollution in 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Dedication plaque for modern Kedzie bus 
garage was unveiled at the opening 
ceremony by (left to right) CTA Executive 



Director Bernard J. Ford, CTA Chairman 
Michael A. Cardilli, and CTA Vice Chair- 
man Howard Medley. 



1 Buses enter from Kedzie avenue and pass 
■■ through five service lanes. Each lane pro- 
vides currency removal, diesel fuel, motor 
oil, interior cleaning, and refuse collec- 
tion. 

QThree automatic bus washers clean the 
top, front, sides and rear of buses while 
spraying the chassis. Cost efficient 
washers achieve 65 per cent water 
reclamation. 

'■ ....... 



the surrounding residential communi- 
ty, and all exterior bus movements oc- 
cur on Kedzie avenue. 

The building's visual mass is re- 
duced through the use of truncated 
corners, setbacks, texture variations, 
and landscaping. A smooth ap- 
pearance and landscaping on the 
north side preserve the boulevard 
character of Jackson boulevard, while 
the setbacks and truncated corners on 
the south side blend with the residen- 
tial environment of Van Buren street. 

Plans for Kedzie garage were 
prepared by Lester B. Knight & 
Associates working with CTA 
engineers under the direction of pro- 
ject manager F. H. Petzold, Facilities 
Engineering & Maintenance. 

"CTA field construction personnel 
and engineers enjoyed excellent 
cooperation from the consultant, the 
construction contractor, and others in- 
volved," Petzold said. "This enabled 
us to complete construction very close 
to the planned time frame and kept 
extra costs to a minimum." 

Del E. Webb Construction Services, 
Co., the general contractor, in co- 
operation with the CTA's affirmative 
action program, awarded $2 million in 



I Hoists accept both standard and ar- 
ticulated buses for inspection and repair. 



^Four pits, each 140 feet long, can service 
up to 12 buses simultaneously. An 
overhead distribution system dispenses 
lubricants and fluids at each work loca- 
tion. 

■■ • .- • - ■ ■■■■■ 



sub-contracts to more than 11 Disad- 
vantaged Business Enterprises/ 
Women Business Enterprises (DBE/ 
WBE). 

The program was so successful that 
Del E. Webb was honored by the 
Midwest Community Council for 
recruiting and employing minorities 
and women from within the communi- 
ty. 

Funding for the Kedzie garage was 
provided by the Urban Mass Trans- 
portation Administration of the 
U.S. Department of Transportation 
(UMTA/USDOT) and the Illinois 
Department of Transportation (IDOT) 
Initially, the following bus routes, 
returning from Lawndale, are being 
operated out of Kedzie garage: No. 7 
Harrison, No. 12 Roosevelt, No 18 
16th/ 18th, No. 21 Cermak. No. 25 
West Cermak, No. 37 Sedgwick/ 
Ogden, No. 52 Kedzie/California. 
No. 60 Blue Island/26th, and No. 82 
Kimball/Homan. 

In September, the following routes 
will return to Kedzie garage from 
North Avenue garage: No. 16 Lake, 
No. 17 Westchester. No. 20 Madison, 
No. 126 Jackson, and No. 131 
Washington. 



■ 

From the Chairman 



A new generation 



One of my most satisfying ac- 
complishments, since I became CTA 
Chairman, was presiding over the 
opening ceremony at CTA's new Ked- 
zie garage. 

As the first of a new generation of 
bus garages. Kedzie points the way 
toward the future of bus transit in 
Chicago, and demonstrates CTA's 
continuing commitment to serve our 
riders and the surrounding community 
in an efficient, cost-effective and 
responsible manner. 

I congratulate all CTA personnel 
who contributed to the concept, 
design, and construction supervision 
of this facility. The many major bus 
service and bus maintenance ad- 
vancements designed and built into 
the Kedzie garage will enable CTA to 
provide excellent service for many 
years to come on bus routes serving 
the West Side of Chicago. 

This new bus garage also 
demonstrates a new standard of com- 
munity awareness. Interior bus park- 
ing minimizes air and noise pollution; 
day to day bus operations avoid 
residential streets: and the architec- 
tural design complements the sur 
rounding area. I am also proud that 
our general contractor, through 
cooperation with CTA's Affirmative 
Action Program, was honored by the 
Midwest Community Council for 
recruiting and employing minority and 
female workers from the surrounding 
community. 

Kedzie garage is the beginning of 
new capital improvements that will im- 
prove bus transit in Chicago, and we 
are looking forward to the start of con- 
struction this summer of another new 
bus garage, near 103rd street and 
Stony Island, which is expected to 
begin operating in early 1987 



>TUj£^X 



jLXA-: 



' ... 

- *■ •--■•'■ ■■ - - . ■ .... . * ... . - - ■ -, . ' | 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos.6& 7 



RTA incentive 
awards for two 
CTA employees 

Two CTA employees were among 
five transit employee recipients of the 
first awards in RTA Chairman John D. 
Kramer's Employee Incentive Pro- 
gram at RTA headquarters June 13. 

Rosemary Hoskins, 29, a bus 
operator assigned to North Park 
Garage, and rail conductor Joe Jones, 
35, of Jefferson Park Terminal, each 
received checks for $250.00. and cer- 
tificates from the RTA chairman at a 
ceremony in his office. 



Other RTA recipients of the 
Employee Incentive awards were J.T. 
Johnson, Burlington Northern 
Railroad; Marvin McRoberts, 
Milwaukee Road, and John Terrzo, 
Transit Management of West Towns. 

"These people have brightened the 
days of countless riders and set a 
wonderful example for their fellow 
employees," Kramer said. "We have 
many other outstanding employees, 
and some of them will be receiving 
similar awards in the coming months, 
but these five have set the standard for 
the entire RTA family. 

"Employees like these are one 
reason why RTA ridership has been 
increasing beyond our expectations," 



John W. Davis 
appointed Strategic 
Planning Manager 




Joe Jones, rail conductor, Jefferson Park Terminal, and Rosemary Hoskins, bus operator, 
North Park Garage, share their moment of pride with CTA Director of Service Michael 
LaVelle as they display RTA certificates of recognition presented to them for outstanding 
service, along with checks for $250 each. RTA Chairman John D. Kramer honored the two 
CTA employees in a special ceremony at RTA headguarters. 



Ms. Hoskins, a bus operator since 
1977, was rewarded by Kramer for 
her excellent work record which in- 
cludes commendations for her profes- 
sional and gracious manner. She 
holds a bachelor of arts degree in 
education from Augustana College, 
and is a graduate student at Chicago 
State University. 

Jones who became a rail conductor 
in 1973, was also cited for his ex- 
cellent work record, which includes a 
commendation for coming to the aid 
of a rider who had been attacked by a 
group of teenage boys in an attempted 
robbery. 

The veteran CTA conductor is also 
a presiding minister at the Kingdom 
Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses and 
teaches a weekly class in literacy in the 
Austin area where he lives. 



the RTA chairman said. 

Since becoming RTA chairman, 
Kramer has forgone his $1,000 a 
month salary and had the money 
deposited in a special fund to reward 
transit employees who provide excep- 
tional service to the public. 

Since the incentive program was an- 
nounced several weeks ago, the RTA 
has received more than 800 letters 
and phone calls from riders 
nominating exceptional transit 
employees. Kramer had encouraged 
riders to continue making nominations 
by writing RTA Incentive Program, 
300 North State Street, Chicago, IL 
60610, or call 836-4047 between 
8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. Nominations are 
screened by a five-member commit- 
tee. More awards are expected to be 
made soon. 




John W. Davis has been appointed 
Manager of Strategic Planning as an- 
nounced by CTA Executive Director 
Bernard J. Ford. 

As Manager of Strategic Planning, 
Davis and his staff will prepare mis- 
sion, policy, and goal statements 
which serve as guides to strategic and 
tactical planning, objectives, and pro- 
grams for consideration by the 
Chicago Transit Board. 

Davis, 50, is a resident of the 
Chatham area. 

Prior to joining the CTA, Davis 
served as a deputy assessor in the 
Cook County Assessor's office where 
he was responsible for appraising real 
estate, forecasting economic 
developments, and assessing the 
value of all classes of real estate since 
1981. 

From 1978 to 1981, Davis was 
president of the Marjon Realty Com- 
pany, 134 N. LaSalle St., where he 
oversaw commercial and industrial 
sales and was involved in syndication 
and real estate development of multi- 
ple family housing units. 

Davis was director of the property 
disposition branch of the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment (HUD) in Chicago from 1972 to 
1978 where he supervised a staff of 50 
and was property manager for HUD's 
entire state housing inventory and was 
responsible for single and multi-family 
units valued at more than $200 
million. 

Davis is an elder and board chairman 
of the Stony Island Church of Christ 
congregation; is a board member of the 
Chatham Lions Club, and is a vice- 
president of the Chatham-Avalon 
Community Council. 

CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Blaa ends 42-year 
career, joins 
private consultants 



George Krambles (left), retired CTA 

executive director: Bernard J. Ford, 

executive director; and James ft Blaa 

(right), Ford's retiring special assistant, 

share a lighthearted moment as they 

reminisce during a reception honoring 

Blaa at the M&M Club. 




Another montage of recorded events in a 42-year transit career is 
presented by Safety Manager Tom Boyle (left) to James ft Blaa. 
Blaa's wife, Mrs. Ann Blaa (right), enjoys the moment which 
honors her husband. 



Mr. and Mrs. James ft Blaa strike a pose with their family during 
reception at the M&M Club. Standing next to their honored dad is 
daughter, Mary Beth, and son, James ft Jr., a U.S. Navy pilot. 



James R. Blaa. special assistant to 
Executive Director Bernard J. Ford, 
ended his 42-year career in Chicago 
public transit service July 1. 

Blaa served as transportation 
manager from 1974 to Dec. 26, 1982 
when he was named special assistant 
to Ford. His retirement ends an 
84-year family association with public 
transit in Chicago. His grandfather, 
Charles Blaa, was a rapid transit con- 
ductor from 1900 to 1937, and his 
father, Joseph Blaa, was a rapid 
transit motorman and dispatcher from 
1925 to 1960. 

A reception honoring Blaa was held 
on June 28 at the M&M Club in the 
Merchandise Mart. 

Blaa began his career in 1942 with 
the Chicago Surface Lines as an office 
boy in the superintendent's office. He 



joined the U.S. Navy in 1943 and 
served for three years. He returned to 
his public transit career in 1946, and 
the next year CTA began operations 
through the merging of the Chicago 
Surface Lines and the Chicago Rapid 
Transit Company. 

After his appointment as transporta- 
tion manager in 1974, Blaa spent the 
next nine years managing the day-to- 
day operations of CTA's largest divi- 
sion composed of 8,500 employees, 
10 bus garages, nine rapid transit ter- 
minals, and a ticket agent facility. 

He was responsible for moving 
some two million weekday riders over 
2,080 miles of bus routes, and 1,000 
rapid transit cars over 212 miles of rail 
route. 

Many of the space age systems now 
used to control CTA buses and 



'L'-subway trains, a comprehensive 
rapid transit loudspeaker system, and 
a bus emergency location system were 
implemented under Blaa. Today's 
industry-leading CTA control center 
for bus and rapid transit operations 
was planned and created with Blaa's 
leadership. 

Beginning July 2, Blaa will be senior 
vice-president, management services, 
with National Transit Services. Inc., 
Chicago, a private consulting firm to 
transit facilities throughout the United 
States. 

Blaa and his wife, Ann, are the 
parents of a son, James Jr., and a 
daughter, Mary Beth. 

The senior Mr. and Mrs. Blaa live in 
west suburban Riverside where Blaa 
will pursue his hobbies of 
photography, gardening, and music. 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 6 & 7 



Commendation Corner 



George Thurman (North 
Avenue garage) won the ap- 
proval of Francis Jasiak, of 
Westchester, "for the plea- 
sant, helpful and cheerful way 
he performs his duties" on a 
No. 17 Westchester bus. "He 
gave out a schedule to a 
passenger, then answered 
questions as to how to reach 
his destination - all in a very 
friendly and pleasant manner. 
He took time to help a lady 
with a baby and baby cart, 
making sure she got on the 
bus properly. He even ques- 
tioned some Hispanic people 
who looked lost, giving them 
instructions I could see they 
were glad to get. He is a great 
asset for the CTA." 



Willie Borders (North Avenue garage) caught the at- 
tention of George Mostardini, of North Neva Avenue, 
because of his courtesy as operator of a No. 76 Diversey 
bus. "For 13 years I have been riding the Diversey bus 
from Neva to Logan Square. Before I retire, I am com- 
pelled to commend a driver who does his job so well and 
much more. He is polite and considerate of all the riders, 
and believe it or not, he wipes all the seats with paper 
towels before he starts a run after a rain. He is one man 
who does his job well and takes pride in his work. There 
should be more like him." 

Al Clayton (Archer garage) was appreciated by Odessa 
Thompson, of Kimbark Avenue, who was a rider on his 
35th Street bus. "The bus driver was man enough to de- 
mand respect for himself and for his passengers from a 
bunch of schoolchildren, boys and girls, who were curs- 
ing and just plain outrageous (to me). He reprimanded 
them, and they responded, except one who was ordered 
off the bus. I must also say he was very courteous to his 
passe lgers. He greeted everyone with a pleasant hello. 
calle J out the various stops, and told everyone to be 
careful getting on and off the bus." 

John Mack Jr. (Kedzie garage) was the operator of a 
No. 82 Kimball/Homan bus ridden by Jennie Can, of 
Warner Avenue. "He made sure we all were on the bus 
and seated before he started up. As we were a group of 
older people, I thought that was very kind of him. He did 
this all the way to where I got off at Berteau. Also, he 
made sure all the people were off the bus (before starting 
up) . He was very concerned about all of us. I am 70 years 
old, and 1 know what I am talking about. I get around fair- 
ly well, but I am still slower than the younger people, 
which is expected." 




Victor Ramirez Jr. (North Sec- 
tion) was singled out by 
Steven Brichetto, of Foster 
Avenue, for "exemplary" ser- 
vice as conductor of a 
Ravenswood train. "He greets 
passengers with a smile and a 
friendly 'Hello.' If a passenger 
has an inquiry, he readily 
responds in a courteous and 
helpful manner. If he does not 
know the answer, he 
apologizes. He also an- 
nounces each stop in a clear 
voice, along with other helpful 
information, such as places of 
interest and transfer points. 
His performance reveals him 
to be a mature, dedicated and 
thoughtful person capable of 
great potential." 



Booker Bolton (North Avenue garage) was praised for 
the way he operates his No. 66 Chicago bus by Bobbie 
Williams, of South Paulina Avenue. "This operator is the 
most concerned, kind and humanitarian person, who 
cares about people who are out in the streets early in the 
A.M. He knows that most of the connections on Chicago 
Avenue are just seconds apart. When he comes to 
Chicago and State, there is an 'L' that comes at that time, 
and also a bus. He waits a second so these people won't 
have to walk over to the hospital or wait longer for 
another bus. I want to thank him for being so nice." 

Tom Lenoir (Washington garage) was thanked by 
Jeanette Owens, of Merrill Avenue, and other riders on 
his morning Special Services run. "Overall we have come 
to appreciate how valuable the service is. and many of us 
find it difficult to envision how we ever managed without 
it. It is the dedication and hard work of the drivers that 
have helped the program improve greatly. Tom Lenoir is 
one such driver. He has a positive attitude toward his 
passengers, and displays deep concern. He recognizes 
his responsibilities toward his job as well as to us. He is 
liked and appreciated." 

Luis Mendez (North Avenue garage) was commended 
by June Murray, of North Hoyne Avenue, for warding off 
a thief on his No. 76 Diversey bus. "While boarding, I 
was being pickpocketed by a young man. The bus driver 
noticed the suspicious behavior, and started to get out of 
his seat. The young man escaped upon being discovered. 
My backpack had been opened, but my wallet and other 
personal belongs were still there. The quick and assertive 
action of this driver saved me $30. His concern for 
passenger safety, including the prevention of crime, is 
admirable." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



For your benefit i 

I.M. Quick 
makes a deal 

"I'd rather have the cash than 
the benefits," said CTA employee 
I. M. Quick. 

So when Quick arrived at work he 
decided to cut a deal and turn in his 
benefits for the cash value. "What a 
great idea." Quick thought. "1 have 
more than five years of service, my 
family is healthy, and I could use the 
extra pocket change." 

Armed with his plan. Quick sat 
down with benefits specialist, Judith 
Joy. "Are you sure you want to do 
this?" Ms. Joy asked. "Benefits are 
worth a lot more than you realize. Far 
more than the apparent cash value." 

Quick was determined. "Listen, the 
way I figure it. 1 make $20,000 and if 
you give me the money CTA spends 
on my benefits, it must be worth an ex- 
tra $400-$500 a month. That's an ad- 
ditional $6,000 a year." 

Joy pleaded. "You never know 
when the benefits will be useful. They 
are financial security." 

"You can't buy a car with benefits. 
You need cash. I'll trade my benefits 
for cash. Cash is financial security!" 

Thanks for a job well donei 



"Okay! But don't say I didn't try to 
talk you out of it." 

As Quick boarded the bus home he 
reached for his CTA employee pass, 
but he could not find it. After paying 
$1.00 (transfer) he sat back to relive 
his triumph. Unfortunately, he didn't 
realize that he had forfeited the benefit 
of free travel and now he would have 
to pay $40 for a monthly pass. 

The next day. Quick decided he 
needed a vacation and sent a memo 
requesting two weeks. "Absolutely 
not!" was the reply. "You gave that up 
yesterday." ($800 approx.) No vaca- 
tion was only a minor setback. 

Later that same day, his wife 
phoned, and Quick screamed into the 
telephone. "What happened? Where 
is he? He's in the hospital?" His wife 
had just told him that Junior had 
broken his leg sliding into third base. 
"Thank goodness for health in- 
surance." Quick said. "Don't worry, I'll 
pick up the form on my way home." 

"I am sorry. Mr. Quick, but you are 
no longer covered by insurance. You 
gave that benefit up," said Ms. Joy. 

"The hospital and medical bills will 
be a fortune," pleaded Quick. "You 
know how expensive' it can be. It is 
enough to make you sick." (CTA pays 
approx. $3800 per year per employee 



and family.) 

"Don't you get sick, Mr. Quick, 
because you no longer have 'sick pay' 
benefits," Ms. Joy reminded him. 
(CTA pays approx. $400 per year.) 

"Oh no," Quick whispered, "I'll 
die." 

Ms. Joy responded. "That's no 
good either, because we stopped pay- 
ing the premiums on your life in- 
surance policy. That was also a benefit 
you gave up." ($150 per year.) 

"That's all I can take," Quick said. 
"Maybe I'll retire and take my 
pension." 

"What pension?" Joy asked. "You 
gave up all your pension when we cut 
our deal, remember?" 

"Wait a minute. You never told me 
how much these benefits were actually 
worth. I thought they were worth a 
few hundred a month." 

"You would not listen. I tried to 
reason with you." Ms. Joy said. 

"I have done some re-evaluating." 
Quick said. "If I give you back the 
cash, may 1 have my benefits back? I 
think I can appreciate how valuable 
they really are." 

Ms. Joy said, "I agree with you. I 
now believe that you actually under- 
stand that benefits are far more 
valuable than they appear. We have a 
deal!" 



Rosa AHaro, Forest Glen 
Rogelio Arrazola. North Park 

Gregory Barber, North Park 
Otis Barnes, 77th Street 
Alfredo Barrios, Archer 
James Beal Jr., North Avenue 
Hudson Black, Limits 
Nikola Blagojevic, Limits 
Havard Blanks, Kedzie 
Vicki Bledsoe, Howard Kimball 
Dwayne Borom, Limits 
Junior Broadbent, Forest Glen 
Charles Brown, North Park 
Henry Brown, Payroll Accounting 
Claude Brown Jr., Archer 
Matthew Brownlee, District B 
William Brownlie, Forest Glen 

Jean Cage, North Park 
George Calhoun, 69th Street 
John Cameron, Ashland 
Sergio Candelaria, Limits 
Leroy Carr, Forest Glen 
Marvin Chachere, North Park 
Al Clayton, Archer 
Felicia Clower, Limits 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
James Cockrell, Limits 
James Crockett, West Section 

Albert Davies, North Park 
Electra DeAlba, North Avenue 
Herman Duffin, Forest Glen 

August Elke, Archer 
Mattie Elkins, Rail System 



William Finley Jr., North 

Avenue 
James Fitzgerald, Limits 
Gary Folken, North Section 

Anthony Gibson, District D 
Walter Gibson Jr., Archer 
Larry Goffer, Limits 
Wallacene Good, Forest Glen 
Odell Granger, Forest Glen 
Noble Graves, Limits 
John Gray, 77th Street 
Andrew Gray, 69th Street 
Bobby Griffin, Archer 

Niki Hansen, Forest Glen 
Obeddie Hawkins, Jefferson 

Park 
Arthur Hawkins Jr., North 

Avenue 
Olivia Hewitt, 77th Street 
George Hiensman II, 69th 

Street 
Jimmie Hill. b9th Street 
Donald Hudson, Forest Glen 
Willie Hunt, North Avenue 
Ernest Hunter, Beverly 

Nathan Jackson, 77th Street 
Willie Jefferson. 77th Street 
Mary Johnson, North Section 
Ronald Jones, North Park 
Betty Jones, Limits 
James Jones Jr.. Kedzie 

Assunta Kaya, Forest Glen 
Dean Kellum, Jefferson Park 



Young Kim, North Park 
James Kolstad, Beverly 
Robert Kremer, North Park 

Margie Laboy, North Avenue 
Ruben Lopez, North Park 
Wayne Luster, Limits 

Eleanore Madricki, Forest Glen 
Patrick Meaney, Douglas 

Congress 
Salaheddeen Mohammed. 

North Avenue 
Howard Monroe, North Park 
Jack Moore. North Park 
Frederick Moore, North Park 
Delfino Morales, Kedzie 
James Moses Jr., North Avenue 
Heriberto Munzo, North Park 

Sammie Newell, West Section 
James Nielson, Archer 
Stanley Nolan, North Avenue 

Ronald Overton. Ashland 

Charles Patton, Limits 

Juan Perez, Limits 

Lillie Pope, South Section 

Victor Ramirez Jr., Howard 

Kimball 
George Raniszewski, Forest Glen 
J. Rice, 69th Street 
Annie Rice, Limits 
Robert Richardson, North Park 
Eugenio Rivera. North Avenue 
Chester Robertson, Archer 



Salvatore Scurti, North Section 
Gregory Shelby, Limits 
Leevon Skinner, 69th Street 
Robert Smith, Forest Glen 
Terry Smoczynski, Forest Glen 
Luis Sosa, Archer 
Nathaniel Stevens Jr., North 

Park 
Linda Stewart. Limits 
Dwayne Stinson, Limits 
Cheryl Stitts. Limits 
Carl Suddeth. North Park 

Wendell Talbert. North Park 
Earl Terry, Forest Glen 
Henry Terry, Special Services 
Robert Thomas. North Park 
Lee Thompson, North Park 
Eugene Thurmond. District A 
Reginald Tolbert. North Park 
Blanca Torres. Forest Glen 
Eddie Traylor III. North Park 

Lonnie Walker. North Park 
Adolphus Walker Jr., North 

Avenue 
Barbara Ware. 77th Street 
Gary Williams. North Park 

James Yancey. Limits 
Kazimer Yaworski, I orest Glen 
Charles Young, Douglas 
Congress 

Edward Zamiar, North Park 
Theresa Zamora, Limits 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 6& 7 



Maintenance 



{competition is new Roadeo challenge 




n 



Tom Gecan (left), maintenance superintendent. Garages North, who served as Maintenance Roadeo site manager at Forest Glen, stands 
with a group of Maintenance Roadeo participants. They are (from left): William Rafferty, Forest Glen; Jose Martinez, John Ward, and 
John McGreal, North Park; Guido Marzena, Laverne Freeman, and Bennie Jones, Limits, and Darwin Zaremba, Forest Glen. 



Forest Glen Garage has recorded a 
clean sweep in skills competition top 
honors for 1984. 

Besides being home of both the first 
and second place winners in the an- 
nual bus Roadeo, the north side 
garage's maintenance shop also pro- 
duced the first place team in the 1984 
annual three-phase Maintenance 
Roadeo, the first such CTA competi- 
tion to be conducted. 

The first place maintenance team in- 
cludes William Rafferty. assistant 
foreman; combination clerk Frank 



Marshall, and bus repairer Darwin 
Zaremba. The three were each award- 
ed a weekend stay for two at the Nor- 
dic Hills Country Club in Itasca. 

Second and third place honors went 
to the 77th Street Garage. The second 
place team included Nguyen Dai and 
Salvador Contreras, bus repairers: 
and Reuben Johnson, combination 
clerk. The two-man third place team 
was bus repairers John Murphy and 
Phillip Murnane. Each member of the 
top three teams received a special belt 
buckle, an individual trophy, a special 




patch and dinner, theater, and gift cer- 
tificates. 

Other finalists in the maintenance 
competition were fourth place winners 
Willie Rachel, engine washer, and 
William McCray and Theodore 
Yancy, bus repairers, all <>f 
Washington Garage: and bus repairers 
Kenneth Hanna and Michael Kasman 
of Forest Glen Garage, fifth place 

Each member of the top five teams 
received individual plaques and 
jackets while all of the Maintenance 
Roadeo participants received caps. 




Willie Wong (left), Maintenance Roadeo chairman, and William 
Thompson, Bus Roadeo chairman, meet to coordinate participation 
for their respective contestants at Forest Glen and 77th Street 
garage level competition. 



Louis Bieniek, instructor (wearing cap), conducts lottery among 
drivers for order of Roadeo participation. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 





Bill Mooney (left), Kelsey King, and Mel Link, 
Bus Roadeo committee members, discuss 
assignment of judges and equipment 
distribution. 

pens, cups, and patches. Winners and 
their guests were honored at an 
awards banquet held September 21 in 
the Merchandise Mart M&M Club to 
recognize the 1984 bus, rail and 
maintenance Roadeo champions and 
other honorees. 

Willie Wong, maintenance unit 
supervisor at Washington Garage, and 
the 1984 Maintenance Roadeo chair- 
man, said 13 teams, most comprised 
of three people, participated in the first 
Maintenance Roadeo. Each team in- 
cluded at least one clerk or servicer, 
while the third team member was 
either a foreman or an instructor. One 
member was also designated as team 
captain. 



Barbara Reeves, instructor, Agent Training, 
and Charles Dickerson, a South Shops elec- 
trician, check score sheets following 
Maintenance Roadeo at 77th Street Garage. 

Although in the first phase of the 
contest bus and maintenance roadeo 
contestants drove the same course, 
they were not in competition with each 
other. Wong said Maintenance 
Roadeo contestants substituted a stop 
at the wash rack for the passenger stop 
made by bus Roadeo contestants. 

Phase two of the Maintenance 
Roadeo was the safety mechanical 
quiz in which one member of each 
team was designated to take the writ- 
ten test. Phase three was trouble- 
shooting for problems in each vehicle 
within an alloted time. The top three 
scorers were selected as the top three 
teams, Wong said. The final 
maintenance competition was held 
July 22 and July 29 at Kedzie Garage. 




Sergeant Fred Braun, Cook County Sheriff's Police, checks the speed of buses as they 
enter diminishing clearance. The exercise tests the operator's ability to judge position 
and speed of vehicle while driving through a V-shape channel outlined with cones. 
Operator must maintain a minimum speed of 20 miles per hour on entering the channel. 



Operations 
division continues 
to revamp 

Five sections of the Operations Divi- 
sion are exercising greater autonomy 
as a result of a June 10 organizational 
restructure. 

Given an increased responsibility in 
transportation operations were 
Transportation Service, Personnel. 
Administrative Services. Train- 
ing/Instruction, and Communica- 
tions/Power Control. 

Although the Operations reshuffle 
which established the five departments 
created no new positions, directors 
already in those areas were named 
managers. The respective department 
managers are Michael LaVelle. Alex 
Johnson, Robert Desvignes. Elonzo 
Hill, and David Martin, the lone ex- 
ception who was reassigned from his 
previous position as area superinten- 
dent. Central (Personnel). 

Assuming responsibilities as direc- 
tors are Ronald Baker, Rail Personnel; 
Michael Lacriola, Bus Personnel: Issac 
Beal, Elderly/Handicapped Special 
Services; Edward Mitchell, Technical 
Services and Data Control; William 
Mooney, Administration and Quality 
Control, and Bill Sholdice, Training 
Development. 

New responsibilities assumed by 
area superintendents are: Rail Person- 
nel South. Ward Chamberlain; Rail 
Personnel North. Lester Racker; Bus 
Personnel South, Thomas Reilly; and 
Bus Personnel North, William Moser. 

Appointed superintendent III were 
David Curry, and L.J. Hampton. Per- 
sonnel. Superintendents are Lino 
Alcaraz. Bus Communication; James 
Washington. Power/Data Control; 
Jerry Johnson. Rail Communication, 
and Louis Sanford. Budget and Posi- 
tion Control. 



Insurance coverage 

Unmarried dependents of CTA 
employees who are at least 19 but less 
than 23 years old, and enrolled in a 
minimum of 12 hours at an accredited 
U.S. trade or career school, are now 
eligible for CTA health insurance 
coverage, provided they reside with 
the employee. 



7984 Vol. 37 ■ Nos. 6 & 7 



9 




James Mayes — 69th "The 
competition was so tough this 
year that I might not try again 
next time. This was my fourth 
Roadeo. 1 knew I could do the 
course and I was determined that 
I would end up on top." 




Hueylon Steward — 69th 

"This was my third try in the 
Roadeo and the first time 1 made 
the Winning Circle 20. I'm thrill- 
ed to be close to the top. This 
was an easier time out than the 
first two times and I'm ready to 
replace John Odom, as best 
driver." 






David James — North 
Avenue "I thought I was a little 
too cautious this time with my 
bus I had some problems with 
the left turn, and I spent too 
much time on the obstacle 
course. This caused me to lose 
points, but I'm still moving 
ahead " 




Jose Moreno — North Park 

"This was my first time — it was 
really nice and I'm thrilled to be 
in the Winning Circle 20. I had 
problems backing the bus and 
the final cone gave me a scare. I 
may have been driving slower 
than I should have " 





Willie Whisenton — Limits 

"This is my third time in the Win 
ning Circle 20 1 was in the first 
two, missed last year due to il- 
lness, and I think the idea is just 
great. We should have more im- 
age building events like this to in- 
still more pride and interest in 
our bus operators." 




Willie Stewart - North 
Avenue "This was my second 
try I entered the first Roadeo but 
I didn't make the Winning Circle 
20. Maybe I made it because I 
was more relaxed. I noticed the 
other drivers seemed more re- 
laxed than those 1 was with that 
first time " 



Milton LeShore — North 
Avenue "This competition was 
my second. I felt more relaxed 
and more familiar with the 
obstacle course. Even so, the 
final cone gave me a problem 
The contestants are suppose to 
stop six inches form the cone, 
but not to knock it over." 




Jimmie Johnson — 

Washington "This year's 
Roadeo was a great test of skills 
-it seperated the 'big boys' from 
the 'little boys.' I especially liked 
the obstacle course where I was 
able to put all my driving skills to 
the final test " 



William Edgerton — Limits, 

"This was my first competition] 
and I enjoyed it very much. I en-l 
joyed the sense of competition 
against the others. The obstacle 
course was most enjoyable, but 
backing up a bus was a reali 
challenge." 




John Odom - 69th When I 
won my first competition three 1 
years ago. my score was 440 out 
of 650 points. This year's; 
preliminary contest had four of 
us over the 600 points, and all of 
us were over 500 points each. 
The Roadeo has cought on, andl 
driving skills have improved." 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




vfichael Matas — Forest 

jlen "This year I did it again. 
JSt like I did last year. I got ner- 
'ous. But, I gave it my best when 
was the center of all those 
jdges' attention A couple of 
pod things happened — I over- 
ame the problems I had last 
ear." 




larcellus Williamson — 
>9th Street "This year's com- 
etitors were much better than 
ist year's contestants; they were 
tuch harder to beat. My main 
.oncern was those tennis balls 
l/hich we had to curb next to 
without causing them to even 
raver " 



Rufus Meeks - 69th Of 

course I realized the mistakes I 
made last year, so I did much 
better this time. Last year the 'Y' 
back-up was a tough (bus) 
maneuver for me. This year it 
was the easiest because I con- 
centrated on it. I profitted from 
last year's mistakes." 




Luther Lewis — Washington 

"I was sure glad to be in this 
year's Roadeo and be in the 
Winning Circle 20. The obstacle 
test was a real challenge, but I 
had a strong desire to compete 
and to win in my third Roadeo I 
kept telling myself to stay loose 
and be relaxed " 




Willie Johnson — North 
Avenue "This Roadeo to me is 
like the Olympic games and 
believe me, I'm going for the 
gold. I had a problem curbing my 
bus because I drive the Lake 
street route where 'L' pillars and 
illegally parked cars prevent bus 
operators from curbing 




Joe Rodenski — Forest Glen 

"This year's contestants were the 
best I've seen and I've been in 
every Roadeo since it started. 
For myself, 1 thought I did about 
the same this year as I did last 
year But I decided I want to be 
in the final four." 




Ladell Jackson — North 
Avenue "This was my second 
time in the top 20 I felt the quali- 
ty of competition this year was 
about the same as in 1982 The 
obstacle course again gave me 
problems, especially those 
darned tennis balls we had to 
drive close to but not move." 




Alan Wilson — 77th "This was 
my first year and I sure was ex- 
cited to make the Winning Circle 
20 That's what I set out to do. 
The obstacle course was stiff, not 
impossible, but a good chal- 
lenge I'm constantly working to 
rnprove my driving techniques." 




Laurence Weathersby — 
69th "I competed last year, but 
this year's contestants were bet- 
ter The obstacle course was 
similar, but the quality of the 
drivers was better. This year I 
figured to defeat John Odom for 
the top spot." 




Eugene Tate — Kedzie "The 
competition was great this year 
and I guess the older guys, like 
Roadeo champ John Odom. 
figured they couldn't be 
defeated. Last year I didn't finish 
near the final four But that was 
last year I really enjoyed the 
competition." 



7984 Vol. 37 ■ Nos. 6 & 7 



11 





Michael Matas, 1984 CTA Bus Roadeo champion, raises his hand as Deputy Executive Director, Operations. 
Harry Reddrick (left), announces Roadeo '84 results before employees at Forest Glen Garage where Matas 
is assigned. Standing next to the new champion is first runnerup Joe Rodenski, also of Forest Glen. 

"Smooth and Easy." the 35-year old 



Michael Matas. the 1982 Roadeo 
"bridesmaid," and third place "show" 
in last year's competition, edged his 
garage mate and closest competitor, 
Joseph "Roadeo Joe" Rodenski by 16 
seconds to take the 1984 champion- 
ship. 

Matas and Rodenski of Forest Glen 
finished the course with 667 points 
each as officials used the clock to 
break the tie. Rodenski garnered his 
points in six minutes, four seconds 
while Matas rapped it up in five 
minutes, 48 seconds. John Odom. the 
Bus Roadeo darling of 1982 and '83, 
was still in the money, finishing third 
with 657 points— 10 points behind the 
new champion and runnerup 

Odom had said, since the garage 
competition of the 1982 Roadeo, that 
Matas was the man to beat. "He's the 
guy to watch because he doesn't rattle. 
Nothing seems to bother him, and he 
uses driving techniques similar to my 
own," Odom observed as late as last 
year. 

Known on the Roadeo circuit as 




John Odom, 69th Street Garage, third 
place winner in the annual Roadeo com- 
petition, thanks his co-workers for the 
support and congratulates Matas on his 
success. Odom had held the champion- 
ship since 1982. 



Matas, a 14-year CTA veteran, told 
Bus Roadeo Chairman William 
Thompson. "There never was any 
doubt in my mind that I was the best. 
All I really had to do was put the train- 
ing 1 received from CTA to good use." 

In his opinion of the Roadeo Matas, 
a line instructor, said, "It's great. It 
gives me a chance to show pride in 
myself, and my job. It also gives me a 
chance to display my driving skills." 

Taking fourth place honors was 
Ladell Jackson of North Avenue with 
636 points. All four winners are 
Roadeo veterans. 

Matas and his quest will be the CTA 
recipients of the annual all-expense 
paid trip to the American Public Tran- 
sit Association (APTA) convention to 
be held this year in Washington. 
There, like his Roadeo champion 
predecessors, Matas will represent 
CTA in the APTA International Bus 
Roadeo. The winner of that competi- 
tion receives $1,000 and a com- 
memorative plaque. 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Ladell Jackson, North Avenue Garage, 
beams proudly after being named fourth 
place winner in the 1984 Bus Roadeo 
competition. 

Rodenski collected the $500 savings 
bond awarded to the first runnerup. 
and will be the Matas backup to the 
APTA competition should the cham- 
pion be unable to go to the nation's 
capital for the international contest. 

Line instructor Odom received a 
$200 savings bond for the 1984 third 
place position while Ladell Jackson 
was awarded a $100 savings bond for 
his fourth place finish. The savings 
bonds and appropriate trophies for the 
four were presented September 21 at 
a Merchandise Mart M&M Club ban- 
quet honoring CTA's 1984 Bus 
Roadeo, Third Rail Roundup, and 
Ticket Agent TieUp winners. 

At the garage-level competitions 
held in June. Odom, runnerup in the 
1983 APTA competition at Denver, 
had led other contestants in the 1984 
Winning Circle 20 with 624 points. 

His closest competitors, all ex- 
perienced Roadeo contestants, were 
Michael Matas. 617: Rufus Meeks, 
601; Joe Rodenski, 600; and Ladell 
Jackson, 595. The top 20 drivers were 
selected according to scores earned in 
local garage competition held June 3 
and 10 at Forest Glen and 77th Street 
garages. 

The final competition, in which 
Matas was declared the 1984 winner, 
was held August 1 1 at Soldier Field. 
"We would like very much to see him 
bring the international championship 
back to our property." CTA Bus 
Roadeo Chairman Bill Thompson said 
of Matas. 

The Bus Roadeo advisory commit- 
tee this year included Thompson who 
is superintendent of Bus Instruction; 
Elonzo Hill, manager, Train- 
ing/Instruction; Paul Kadowaki, direc- 
tor. Instruction, and Robert 
Desvignes. manager. Operations Ad- 
ministrative Services. 



Two CTA operators among RTA honorees 




Liborio Chavez (left), a CTA bus operator from North Avenue Garage, and Operator 
Dwayne Borom of Limits Garage, display the certificates of achievement presented to 
them by RTA Chairman John D. Kramer in recognition of their outstanding service. 



Two CTA bus operators were 
among eight public transportation 
employees to recently share another 
$2,000 of Regional Transportation 
Authority Chairman John D. Kramer's 
salary. 

Dwayne Borom, 36, Limits Garage, 
and Liborio Chavez, 36, of North 
Avenue Garage, each received checks 
for $250.00. and certificates of ap- 
preciation from the RTA chairman at a 
ceremony in his office. The first CTA 
recipients to be honored by Kramer. 
Rosemary Hoskins of North Park 
Garage, and Joe Jones of Jefferson 
Park Terminal, received their awards 
of $250.00 each in May. 

Liborio Chavez, a bus operator 
since 1980. formerly studied for the 
priesthood. He has established rapport 
with his riders through his mastery of 
six languages, as well as his friendly 
and patient manner. 

In addition to speaking fluent 
English and Spanish. Chavez has a 
good working knowledge of Polish, 
Italian, French and Portuguese. His 
passengers have written of his com- 



mand of languages as well as his 
friendly manner. 

Dwayne Borom who joined CTA in 
1970 has had the continued praises of 
his riders for his cheery disposition, his 
concern for his riders and his excep- 
tionally neat appearance. 

Other RTA recipients of the 
Employee Incentive awards were 
Frank Granger. NIRC Milwaukee 
District; Robert Hawker. NIRC. Rock 
Island: Dolores Koslowski. Suburban 
Bus District/Bolingbrook Park District 
paratransit: George Rettig, 
SBD/Transit Management. Wau- 
kegan; Dennis Schlei. Chicago and 
Northwestern: and Lora Ann Starnes. 
SBD 'Commuter Bus Service, Naper- 
vile. 

"No matter how much the RTA 
Board does to improve service — and 
I think we've done a lot — it's the 
drivers, conductors and ticket agents 
who make riding the RTA a pleasant 
experience." Kramer said. "These 
eight people are experts at public rela- 
tions. Any transit system would be 
proud to have them. I'm glad they 
work for us." 



1984 Vol. 37 - Nos. 6 & 7 



13 



Gallery of June Graduates in CTA Families 

Here are the proudest pictures of the school year identified by name, school, parent, 

and parent's CTA work location. 




TANYA L ADELL 

Hyde Park Career 

Academy 

Ethel Adell 

West Section 



NANCY ANNE 
BARKER 

College of Lake County 

Allan R. Barker 

Fac. Engr. & Maint 



SHARON A. 
BASSETT 

Proviso East H.S. 
Fred L. Bassett 

North Avenue 



TAMMY BATZEL 

Bremen H.S. 
John Batzel 

Control Center 



MICHAEL 
BENSHISH 

Driscoll Catholic H.S. 
Ronald Benshlsh 

Equip. Engr/Maint. 



KRYSTAL BOOKER 

St. Ignatius H.S. 
Richard True 

Archer 




FRANK BRUNO JR. 

East Leyden H.S 
Frank Bruno Sr. 

Lawndale 



MICHELLE MARIE 
BRUNO 

TaftH S 
Robert R. Bruno 

Madison / Wabas h 



URSULA BURNS 

Academy of Our Lady 
John IV. Burns 

District C 



CHRISTINE M. 
CUFFORD 

Wheaton Central H S 
Patrick J. Clifford 

Finance 



RODNEY COLLINS 

Mendel Catholic H S. 
James A. Collins 

77th Street 



STEPHANIE 
CONNER 

Lindblom H.S. 
Calvin Conner 

South Shops 




LEONARD 
DAVENPORT 

Univ. of lll-Ch/Urb 
Leonard D. Davenport 

Skokie Shop 



KATHRYN DAVIS 

Mother McAuley 
Ozle Davis 

69th Street 



CATHERINE B. 
DOLAN 

Loyola Univ 
Peter Dolan 

North Park 



LINDA DUNDOVICH 

Mother Guerin H S 
Mark Dundovlch 

Skokie Shop 



TAVIO D. DUNLAP 

Semeon H S 
Lawrence D. Dunlap 

Archer 



RUSSELL O. ERMON 

St Thomas 
Sylvester J. Ermon 

77th Street 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



JAMES F. FAHEY 

U. of I. College 

of Pharmacy 

James M. Fahey 

North Rail District 



JEFFREY FEULNER 

Thornwood H.S 
Walter Feulner 

South Shops 



CHERISE MICHELLE 
FREEMAN 

Bradley University 
Howard Freeman 

District B 



JANE CHRISTINE 
GASIOROWSKI 

Johnsburg H.S 
Joseph T. Gaslorowskl 

Wilson Shop 



JOSEPH J. 
GINGRAS. JR. 

St Lawrence H S 
Joseph J. Glngras, Sr. 

Datacenter 



LeDONNA GRAY 

Purdue Univ 
Marsha Spires 

Insurance 




KIMBERLY JOY 
GRAYER 

Elizabeth Seton H S 
John Grayer 

77th Street 



WILLIAM 
GREENWOOD, JR. 

Harper Career Dvlp 

William 

Greenwood, Sr. 

Archer 



TINA L HARDY 

Hyde Park Academy 
Willie E. Hardy 

Archer 



CHARLES T. 
HARPER 

Lindblom Tech. H.S. 
Charles N. Harper 



LECTRIC L HEATH 

Corliss H.S. 
Mildred Heath 

77th Street 



KEITH JOHNSON 

Lake Park H.S 
Vic L. Johnson 

Materials Management 




CHRISTOPHER A. 
JONES 

Percy L. Julian H.S 

Allan M. Jones 

95th Street 



ERIC M. JONES 

Percy L Julian H S 
Allan M. Jones 

95th Street 



RONALD W. JONES 

Mendel H.S 
Ronald F. Jones 

North Park 



JOYCE MARIE 
LAZZARA 

Loyola University 
Joseph T. Lazzara 

Capital Deuelopment 



FERNANDO LEAL 

St. Gregory H.S 
Elda Leal 

Community Relations 



LORI ANN LI UNI K 
Notre Dame H S for 

Girls 
James A. Blecker 

Limits 




BEVERLY 

CHERELLE 

LEWIS 

IIT 
Wlnmon Lewis 

South Shops 



LORELLE GYNETH 
McCURTIS 

Immaculate Heart of 

Mary H S 
James L. McCurtls 

Lake Street 



MICHELLE 
MICETICH 

Bogan H.S 
Francis Mlcetlch 

Retired 



CAROLYN MOORE 

CVS 
Joe W. Moore 

West Shops 



SAMUEL L 
MOORE. JR. 

Lindblom 
Samuel L. Moore. 

Howard 



Sr. 



REGINALD MOTT 

Whitney Young H S 

James Mott 

District C 



1984 Vol. 37 ■ Nos. 6& 7 



15 



JOHN W. NORUM 

Lane Technical H.S. 
Milan H. Norum 

Linden Ave 
Patricia Norum 

Fac. Engr. 



RAYMOND H. NORUM 

Northeastern Illinois U 
Milan H. Norum 

Linden Ave. 
Patricia Norum 

Fac. Eng. 



MARY M. OLSEN 

Buffalo Grove H.S. 
Gary A. Olsen 

Skokie Shop 



MARISA OROZCO 

Lane Tech. H.S 
Pedro R. Orozco 

North Park 



PIPER RENEE 
PARKER 

Unity Catholic H.S. 
Charles E. Parker 

Archer 



JOSEPH P. PIENTO 

Maine East H S. 
Joseph IV. Plento 

Control Center 




CONSTANCE E. 
PORTER 

Lindblom H.S. 
Al Porter 

Claim 



MONICA F. PORTER 

Northwestern Univ. 
A. Porter 

Claim 



GAYLE POTTER 

St Benedict's H.S 
Dale Potter 

West Shops 




ROGER RODRIGUEZ 

St Nicholas of 

Tolentine 

Rogelto Rodriguez 

Skokie Shop 



JILL LYNN 
ST. JAMES 

Elizabeth Seton H.S 
Lloyd St. James 

77th Street 



JEFF ANTHONY 
SCHAAF 

St. Rita H S 
Cornelius Schaaf 

54th Street 



WILLIAM KEVIN 
REILLY 

Divine Word Seminary 
Thomas J. Reilly 

Far South 



UTE JOAN 
RICHMAN 

Lane Technical H.S. 
Betty Rlchman 

Skokie Shop 







1 








, ■ 






* 




> 


\ 









LORITA SHELLEY 

Academy of Our Lady 
Jeffrie Shelley 

Datacenter 



BARBARA ANN 
SILAS 

Lindblom H S. 
Charles Silas 

District B 



VERNETTA 

ROB1NZINE 

Hyde Park H.S. 
Pearlman Robinzine 

District B 




REGINALD T. 
SLATER 

Simeon H S 
Roy E. Slater 

South Shops 




RORY E. SLATER 

Grinell College 
Roy E. Slater 

South Shops 



VALENCIA SMITH 

South Shore H.S. 
Jerome Smith 

77th Street 



YVETTE STEWART 

Bradley Univ 
James H. Stewart 

77th Street 



STEVEN SZPISJAK 

Marmion Military 

Academy 
Joseph Maslarz 

Retired 



VERONICA 
THURMOND 

Fenger H S 
Eugene Thurmond 

District A 



JOSEPH 
TOKARCZYK 

Curie H.S. 
Edward Tokarczyk 

Madison / Wabash 



16 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




PAUL TORREY 

Prospect H S 
Tom Torrey 

Skokie Shop 



TED VERGES 

Steinmetz H.S. 
Spelios Paul Verges 

West Shops 




JARROD WALLACE 

CVS 
John Wallace 
Control Center 



JOHN ANTHONY 

WILLIAMS 
Driscoll Catholic H.S 
William F. Williams 

North Park 




JOSEPH F. 
WILLIAMS 

Driscoll Catholic H.S. 
William F. Williams 

North Park 



VANISSA L. 

WILLIAMS 

Whitney Young H S 

Robert Williams 

95th Street 




MARSHA 
ZACCARIELLO 

Prosser Voc. H.S. 
Peter Zaccariello 

Retired 



ALONSO ZAPATA 

Whitney Young 
Carlos Zapata 

Lawndale 



Courageous, talented 
student is honored 
at Whitney high 




Halfback Reginald Molt approaches 
fans during a Whitney Young high 
game. Mott, one of the school's oral and 
hearing handicapped students, will be a 
freshman next year at Northern Illinois 
University in DeKalb. 

June 22 was commencement day at 
Whitney Young High School---a new 
beginning for its 1984 graduates who 
will soon step into different roles. 

For Reginald Mott. 18, the new 
beginning will be in August when, like 
many other freshmen, he will report to 
Northern Illinois University. Ordinari- 
ly, going off to college is not so 
unusual, but Reggie, as he is known 
by friends, is not an ordinary young 
man. 

The son of CTA bus service super- 
visor James Mott. Reggie was born 
deaf and mute. He leaves Whitney 
Young as perhaps one of its most 
popular students, and certainly one of 
its most courageous athletes. Mott was 
a member of the high school's football 
team throughout his four years at 
Whitney Young. 

He is credited with scoring one 
touchdown for the Whitney Young 
Dolphins in the 1983-84 season. 
Another Mott TD was nullified on a 
penalty. On Senior Honors Day. the 
young halfback was the recipient of 
the Outstanding Athlete Award. 
Gerald Prince, Whitney Young's foot- 
ball coach and instructor of the oral 
and hearing impaired students, said 
not only was Reggie a letter winner 
each year, "but he is a personality plus 

guy. 

"He is a very good role model---a 
sensitive and cooperative person, and 
a very popular student. We had 2.400 
students at Whitney Young this 
year---200 among the oral and hear- 



ing impaired. I think every one of our 
students knows Reggie, and all 
manage to communicate with him." 
said the coach. "He is popular with 
everybody." he added. 

William F. Pahle. coordinator of 
City-wide High School Hearing Im- 
paired Programs, noted that Mott also 
has an affinity for math and science, 
and is talented in arts and crafts. His 
skill as a craftsman was demonstrated 
at the Museum of Science and In- 
dustry recently, when his handcrafted 
lamp was the only Whitney Young arts 
craft work selected to be shown with 
first place exhibited items in the city- 
wide high school arts and crafts com- 
petition. Mott's father said his son's 
achievement at the exhibition 
stimulated a lot of family pride. 

"We are certainly going to miss Reg- 
gie at Whitney Young, but he will be 
remembered for a long time by all of 
us." said Pahle. "He comes from a 
loving, caring family and he has done 
very well." 



Smargons attend 
graduation of grandson 




Jonathan L. Hilder, grandson of 
CTA retiree Sam Smargon and son of 
Mr. and Mrs Syd Hilder of Chicago, 
was awarded a baccalaureate degree 
in business administration from the 
University of Iowa. Iowa City. May 12. 

Retiree Smargon. and his wife 
Miriam, life-long residents of Chicago, 
now reside in Tamarac. Florida, where 
they are enjoying retirement. 

The Smargons are also looking for- 
ward to the joyous occasion in 
November when they return to 
Chicago for the wedding of another 
grandson, Allen Hilder. An older 
grandson, Phillip H. Hilder, was 
recently appointed to the U.S. District 
Attorney's Office in Houston. TX. All 
three of the Smargon grandsons are 
graduates of the University of Iowas. 



1984 Vol. 37 - Nos. 6 & 7 



17 



HMO opens 
30-day enrollment 

CTA employees wishing to join one 
of the eight Health Maintenance 
Organizations may enroll during the 
month of October when the annual 
30-day enrollment period is open. 

The eight HMO plans open for 
membership are Cooperative Health, 
Anchor, HAP, Maxicare/Intergroup, 
Michael Reese, Prucare, Union, and 
Chicago HMO. Enrollment packages 
are available at all work locations, and 
provide a comparison of benefits 
under HMOs and the present Com- 
prehensive Medical Plan. Specific 
enrollment authorization cards are in- 
cluded in each package. 

An HMO provides health care on a 
prepayment basis with emphasis on 
comprehensive and preventive treat- 
ment. The plan offers complete care 
including specialist referrals, and 
laboratory and hospital services. 
Although an HMO does not provide 
dental service, the CTA employee 
choosing an HMO will not lose this 
benefit. Dental care is still provided as 
under the Travelers Comprehensive 
Medical Plan with the usual reimburse- 
ment procedures. 

The HMO program is an alternative 
to the Travelers Comprehensive 
Medical Plan and is strictly voluntary. 
The CTA will contribute the same 
amount toward any HMO plan for an 
employee as it does for the Travelers 
Comprehensive Medical Plan. 
However, persons who wish to remain 
with the comprehensive program are 
not obligated to change their health 
care plans. For additional information, 
employees should contact the In- 
surance Department on ext. 3618. 



Journeymen painters 

Robert D. Kuropas, and Richard Chacon 
were recently elevated to journeymen 
painters at their South Shops location. 
Kuropas joined CTA in 1977, and Chacon 
in 1978. 

Both men started their CTA careers as 
bus servicers, and became apprentice 
painters in 1980. Painters are required to 
serve a four-year apprenticeship before 
being elevated to journeymen. 



SPSA finalist 




James F. Marshall (left), superintendent, Grievance/Arbitration Processes, Labor Rela- 
tions, displays the certificate of recognition presented him as a finalist for the 1984 
Superior Public Service Awards. Extending congratulations to Marshall is Andrew 
Schmidt, acting manager, Labor Relations. 



More June Graduates Wedding Plans 




Mrs. LOUISE 
GOODRICH 

Chicago State 
University, MS Ed 
Juarez Goodrich 

North Avenue 





ELISE L. NOBLE 

Whitney Young H S 
Roger Noble 

North Avenue 



Bus repairman Derrick Smith, South 
Shops, and his fiancee, Miss Andrea 
Bryant, have announced wedding plans 
for October 13 at her south suburban 
Markham family home. Smith, a CTA 
employee since April 1981, and his bride 
will make their home on Chicago's south 
side. Miss Bryant who is the daughter of 
Ms. Alma Bryant McKinstry, and James 
W. Bryant, is employed by the U.S. 
Customs Service. 



18 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Service anniversaries 
in June 

40 Years 

John Ruddle, Tire Insp. Ctr. 

35 Years 

Martin Morrison, Dist A 
Eugene Poduch, Fac. Engr. /Maint. 

30 Years 

Raymond Brennan. North Avenue 
Wendell Edwards, Limits 
Lawrence Hart, North Avenue 
Aaron Henderson, Bus Service 
Robert Johnson, Archer 
William Lee. Dist A 
Willie McCann Jr., Beverly 
Silas Severson, Substation Maint 
Charles Sides, Archer 
Erving Weiler, Beverly 

25 Years 

Edward Ahlbrand, Procurement Engrs. 

David Arreguin, North Park 

Frank Bailey, Archer 

Isaac Beal, Near South 

Richard Bell, 69th Street 

Walter Brozek Sr., Escalator Maint. 

Harland Christ. Elect Engr /Maint. 

Frank English, Elect. Engr. /Maint. 

Clarence Garski, North Park 

Velma Husband, South Section 

Joseph Johnson, Escalator Maint 

Lester Racker, Commun/Power Control 

Richard Reese Jr., Dist. C 

Mary Ritter, West Section 

Ronald Swindell, Power/Sig. Commun. 

Frank Wischler, Forest Glen 



Service anniversaries 

in July 
35 Years 

Daniel Bore, Douglas/Congress 
Rufus Robinsin, Dist D 

30 Years 

Floyd Burns, South Section 
John Golden Jr., North Park 
Tyronza Hancock, North Park 
Elmer Herron, South Shops 
Charles Hill, E/H Special Services 
Wilson Holmes Jr., 69th Street 
Lacy Jackson, 77th Street 
Donald Kuratnik, Archer 

25 Years 

Robert Adams, Forest Glen 
Thomas Boyle. Safety Assurance 
Richard Brown Jr., Archer 
David Driver, 77th Street 
Nick Gallo, Fac. Engr. /Maint. 
David Gordon, 69th Street 
Robert Gorz, Stores-West 
Hugh Haynes, North Avenue 
Charles Jurkus, Stores South 
Michael Kelly, Elect. Engr ./Maint. 
Shirley Knight, North Section 
Chester Larkin, Dist A 
Fred Lorenz, Washington Garage 
Noel McNamara, Fac Engr /Maint. 
Richard Nelson, Fac Engr /Maint. 
Richard Paschal. North Park 
Beauford Robinson, 77th Street 
Willie Shephard, 77th Street 
Earl Smith, Limits 



June Pensioners 

JOSEPH ATKINS. Garage Asst. Frmn.. 

69th Street, Emp. 5-21-51 
GEORGE DREY, Carpenter Leader. 

South Shops. Emp. 3-2-50 
MICHAEL FAHEY. Car Repairman A. 

Rosemont, Emp 1-9-50 
BERNARD KILLACKY. Personnel Invstgtr.. 

Blue Island, Emp 5-11 59 
GEORGE MATHEWS. Bus Operator. 

Archer. Emp. 5-10-48 
GRADY MATTISON. Bus & Truck Mech.. 

South Shops, Emp. 5-11-59 
FRANCIS MAY. Bus & Truck Mech Frmn . 

South Shops, Emp. 4-18-41 
DANIEL MURPHY. Bus & Truck Mech . 

South Shops, Emp. 3-7-49 
LEROY NUTALL, Rail Janitor. 

Madison & Wabash, Emp 1-24-57 
CHRISTOPHER O'BRIEN. Carpenter Frmn . 

West Shops. Emp 9-16-57 
JEROME PAVEL, Bus & Truck Mech. Frmn. 

South Shops. Emp. 3-29-54 
RALPH ROBINSON, Car Repairman B, 

Equip. Engr. & Maint., Emp 7-3-51 
LESLIE ROSS, Instructor, 

Archer, Emp. 3-21-50 
NICK SIMONETTI, Unit Supervisor, 

South Shops, Emp. 5-12-41 
ROSCOE WILSON, Supervisor, 

Central District, Emp. 3-18-52 
THEODORE ZAWISTOWSKI, Bus Servicer. 

Forest Glen, Emp. 10-15-47 

Disability Retirements 

JOSEPHINE COLEMAN, Clerk, 

West Shops, Emp. 10-28-56 
ANTONIO GRAY, Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 12-28-70 
LORRAINE ORR. Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp. 3-18-67 
HILARIO ROSAS, Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 8-26-68 
CHARLES SNYDER, Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp. 8-11-66 
SHEILA WATKINS, Bus Operator, 

Lawndale. Emp. 12-9-74 



July Pensioners 

ROBERT BAGBY. Janitor. 

North Avenue. Emp. 5-19-65 
JAMES BLAA. Spec. Asst. to Exec. Dr., 

Executive Office, Emp. 2-25-42 
ARNOLD CHRISTENSEN. Bus Operator 

Forest Glen. Emp 12-9-63 
JOHN DUFFY. Money Handler. 

South Shops, Emp. 2-22-43 
WENDELL EDWARDS. Bus Operator. 

Limits. Emp. 6-10-54 
RAYMOND GRAHAM. Bus Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 12-12-45 
COLUMBUS GRAY. JR., Bus Operator. 

69th Street, Emp. 3-17-55 
GERARD GULLERY. Elect Wrkr . 

Skokie Shops. Emp. 7-5-48 
LAWRENCE HART, Bus Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp. 6-7-54 
ROY JONES, Ticket Agent. 

West Section. Emp 12-12 57 
ROBERT LaVOIE. Schedule Maker. 

Operations Planning. Emp. 9-17-41 
WILLIE McCANN. Bus Operator. 

Beverly. Emp 6-17-54 
WILLIE MEADOWS. Motorman. 

South Section, Emp. 1-12-53 



PERCY R1DDICK. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 9-30-57 
CHARLES SIDES. Collector. 

Archer, Emp. 6-28-54 
GROVER SMITH, Instructor. 

Forest Glen. Emp 4-6-61 
JAMES SPRAAGS. Bus Operator. 

Lawndale. Emp 1-22-52 
NICHOLAS SUERO. Car Repairman A, 

Des Plaines, Emp. 3 2 48 
WILLIAM SZABELSKI. Elect Wrkr . 

South Shops. Emp 6-12-51 
JAMES WHITE. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp. 10-10-55 
EDWIN WOJDYLA. Supervisor. 

District D. Emp. 5-21-46 

Disability Retirements 

WILLA HAYWOOD, Clerk, 

North Section, Emp 4 29-70 
DOUGLAS MOSELEY, Rail Janitor. 

Madison & Wabash. Emp 12-21-70 
JOHN MURRAY. Warehouse Wrkr I. 

63rd Lower Yard. Emp 3-28-72 
GEORGE RIVERA. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp 9-12-66 



inST D/LttTs/LORT^lS/L 



SANTO BARBARO. 85. Stores. 

Emp 8-22-29, Died 5-3-84 
JAMES CAREY. 67. South Section. 

Emp 10-23-43. Died 5-24-84 
RAYMOND DALKE. 72. Forest Glen. 

Emp 8-12-43. Died 5-3-84 
PAUL FIDANZE. 68. Blue Island, 

Emp 12-30-42. Died 5-17-84 
WILLIAM FLATLEY. 78. South Shops. 

Emp. 10-17-30. Died 5-1-84 
LUDW1G GUST. 85. Kedzie. 

Emp. 9-10-29. Died 5-21-84 
EMIL HANSEN. 90. Transportation. 

Emp. 3-25-19. Died 5-12-84 
CHARLES HASLAM. 71. 54th Street. 

Emp. 5-21-37. Died 5-24-84 
SAMUEL JACOBS. 76. Engineering. 

Emp. 12-16-42. Died 5-6-84 
QUINTON JAMES, 60,. West Shops. 

Emp. 4-10-52, Died 5-18-84 
ALOYS1US KOLMAN. 61. West Shops. 

Emp. 7-22-47. Died 5-20-84 
ROBERT LINK. 87. Const. & Maint . 

Emp. 2-26-19. Died 5-17-84 
ALBERT LONES. 79. South Shops. 

Emp. 2-20-42, Died 4-30-84 
HELEN LYNCH. 84. West Section. 

Emp 2-1-29, Died 5-7-84 
THOMAS LYONS. 67. Veh. Maint.. 

Emp 6-29-49. Died 5-24-84 
RICHARD McAULIFFE. 79. North Park. 

Emp 11-15 27. Died 5-4-84 
EARL McLAUGHLIN. 69. Claims. 

Emp 2-10-43. Died 5-14-84 
MARGUERITE McMAHON, 81. West Section. 

Emp 7-16-26. Died 5-1-84 
WILLIAM McMAHON. 81. Lawndale. 

Emp. 2-26-34. Died 5-4-84 
WARREN POTTS. 60. Kedzie. 

Emp 7 27-23. Died 5-10-84 
GEORGE REIDY. 83. Transportation. 

Emp 7-20-29. Died 5-30-84 
FRED R1ECKE. 79. West Section. 

Emp 7-25-27. Died 5-22-84 
JOHN SUDA. 73. Transportation. 

Emp 9 30-37. Died 5 10-84 
OTTO WEBER. 83. West Section. 

Emp 8-27-23. Died 5-20-84 
JOSEPH WINTERS. 71. Archer. 

Emp 9-26-40. Died 5-5-84 



7984 Vol. 37 ■ Nos. 6 & 7 



19 



IXB EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 

|Formerly Employee Counseling Program) 

"Purpose" 
To find solutions for problems 

"Goal" 
Keep people working 



ALCOHOLISM 

DRUGS 

FINANCIAL 




LEGAL 
' MARITAL 
• EMOTIONAL 



eta Employees or family members 
or significant others 



CONFIDENTIAL /VOLUNTARY 



Next Issue! 



4 




Historical Calendar 





CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume37 Number6&7 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA by the 
Public Affairs/Consumer Services Division. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editor: Rick Willis 
Graphic Designers: Alexandra Eiva, Al Grady 
Contributing Writers: Robert A. Gaines, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, Il- 
linois 60654. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



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_ j#% 7984 Volume 37 - Numbers 9 & 10 

=ICf Transit News 



OPENING 



Kennedy rapid 
transit service extended 

to O'Hare 




The convenience of the union of air travel and rail travel is dramatically demonstrated at the taxiway bridge on the Kennedy Expressway 



L 



abor Day, 1984, marked an historic event for 
CTA and the City of Chicago as a CTA eight-car train completed its maiden run to O'Hare International 
Airport from River road. 

The long-anticipated extension of service along the Kennedy Expressway rapid transit line from 
downtown to O'Hare, the world's busiest airport, was now a reality. 

At River road where the ceremonies began, CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli and Governor James 
Thompson placed the Chicago flag, which Mayor Washington had given them, on the front of the train. 



(continued on page 2) 




At the inaugural ceremony in the 
new O'Hare Terminal, CTA 
Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 
proclaims, "The most important 
aspect of the O'Hare Extension is 
the added convenience to riders on 
the finest transportation system in- 
the nation." Other speakers who 
lauded the transit improvement 
were Illinois Governor James R. 
Thompson, Illinois Senator Charles 
A. Percy, Mayor Harold Washington, 
and UMTA Administrator 
Ralph L Stanley. 



(continued from page 1) 

More than 500 guests and rail en- 
thusiasts boarded the train for this 
historic first ride. Dignitaries aboard the 
"'A' Train to O'Hare" included Gover- 
nor Thompson. Mayor Washington. 
U.S. Senator Charles Percy, Chairman 
Cardilli, members of both CTA and 
RTA boards, suburban mayors, 
community organiza- 



and 



aldermen 
tions. 

As the train 
sounds of the 



With its colorful, serpentine, backlit, glass-block walls and spacious interior, O'Hare 
Terminal has been called "Chicago's newest art gallery." 



left River road, the 
Dixie Ramblers band 
echoed throughout the station, and 
hundreds of well wishers lined the plat- 
form. 

As the train entered O'Hare terminal, 
its passengers were greeted by what has 
been called "Chicago's newest art 
gallery." The O'Hare station, designed 
by the world-renowned architectural 
firm of Murphy /Jahn, is striking in its 
size and splashes of color. The walls are 
a rainbow of colors, created through the 
use of undulating backlighted floor-to- 
ceiling glass blocks. This serpentine 
design creates the feeling of motion and 
openness. 

Upon conclusion of the formal 
ceremonies at O'Hare. including 
speeches by both Mayor Washington 
and Chairman Cardilli, jazz trumpeter 
Dizzy Gillespie and the Dizzy Gillespie 
Quartet broke into the Duke Ellington 
classic — "Take the 'A' Train" — sym- 
bolizing the first in-service train to arrive 
at O'Hare. Guests attended a reception 
in the terminal area and CTA provided 
free rides from O'Hare throughout the 
day. 

Completion of the 7.9 mile section 
from Jefferson Park to O'Hare was the 
culmination of more than 14 years of 
planning and engineering. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Since 1970 when CTA and the City 
of Chicago dedicated the original 5.2 
miles of the Kennedy rapid transit line 
(Logan Square to Jefferson Park), CTA 
transit experts and City Department of 
Public Works planners were preparing 
for the eventual expansion of the West- 
Northwest rapid transit line to O'Hare. 

Total cost of the O'Hare extension, 
which was funded through the state and 




On the entrance level of the River Road sta- 
tion, dignitaries and guests enjoy coffee 
and conversation while awaiting the arrival 
of the inaugural O'Hare train. 

federal governments, was $196 million. 

The complete O'Hare extension, 
which operates in the median of the 
Kennedy expressway, includes four sta- 
tions — three intermediate stations 
which opened in 1983 at Harlem 
avenue, Cumberland avenue, and 
River road; and the O'Hare terminal at 
the airport. 

Acknowledging the value of the 
O'Hare extension, Chairman Cardilli 
said, "This direct link from downtown 



Chicago to O'Hare International Airport 
will have a positive impact on an 
already powerful central business 
district. 

"Another benefit of this rapid transit 
line, is the tremendous growth of 
residential, commercial, and hotel 
development along the Kennedy ex- 
pressway corridor towards O'Hare. The 
expansion of the West-Northwest rapid 
transit line is, in large measure, respon- 
sible for the area's growth. 

"However, the single most important 
aspect of the O'Hare extension is the 
convenience to the riding public. Now, 
thousands more commuters, shoppers, 
travelers, and airport employees are 
able to take advantage of the finest 
public transit system in the nation." 

In addition to the pleasing aesthetics, 
the O'Hare extension boasts state of the 
art technology. Trains passing through 
the Rosemont yard and into the O'Hare 
terminal are switched by a new in- 
terlocking system. This computerized 
system provides smooth, efficient 
routing of trains. Further, it provides 
precise train identification via central- 
ized traffic control screens in the Mer- 
chandise Mart Control Room. 

Once inside the 2.2 miles of subway 
(entering the O'Hare terminal), trains 
run on "direct fixation design" trackage. 
This is the most modern, up-to-date 
track fastening system in use. It reduces 
noise and vibration, adding to 
passenger comfort. 

High technology combined with 
passenger comfort and convenience 
make the 35-minute trip from 
downtown to O'Hare airport along the 
West-Northwest rapid transit line one of 
the finest examples of public transporta- 
tion in the nation. 



From the Chairman 
Entering the Air Age 

All Chicagoans, especially transit 
riders, had reason to celebrate this 
Labor day when CTA's rapid transit 
system entered the Air Age. The com- 
pletion of the O'Hare Extension to our 
new terminal facility at O'Hare Interna- 
tional Airport provides a 35-minute 
link between the world's busiest airport 
and downtown Chicago, one of the 
world's greatest business centers. 

By far the most important benefit of 
this new service is the convenient and 
economical transportation that can 
now be enjoyed by airport employees, 
airline passengers, and residents of our 
metropolitan area. Because the 
O'Hare service links air travel to our 
entire rapid transit and bus system, 
many more riders can now avoid the 
traffic tie-ups. the rush-hour delays, 
and the expense of driving. This will 
contribute to an improved life-style for 
all Chicagoans, as symbolized by the 
City of Chicago Hag that Governor 
Thompson, Mayor Washington and I 
installed on the inaugural train. 

I congratulate the Chicago Depart- 
ment of Public Works, the architectural 
and construction firms, and the CTA 
engineers and other employees who 
worked together to make Chicago's 
latest transportation marvel an 
aesthetic and operational success. And 
I thank the federal and state govern- 
ments, which have continually en- 
dorsed transit through capital funding. 

While it is important that we im- 
prove out transportation facilities, it is 
also most important that all CTA 
employees continue to increase then- 
job knowledge and improve their job 
performance. For this reason. I con- 
gratulate all employees who entered or 
supported the Bus Roadeo. Third Rail 
Roundup, and Ticket Agent TieUp 
competitions. While we have already 
presented special honors to the win- 
ners of these competitions, we must 
also recognize all participants who im- 
proved themselves through these pro- 
grams and helped make these pro- 
grams a continuing and increasing 
success. ^ . 




1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 9 & 10 



Six CTA employees 
among recipients of 
final Kramer awards 



Retiring Regional Transportation Authority Chairman 
John D. Kramer gave $1,500 of his RTA salary to six 
outstanding CTA employees on September 12 after they 
were nominated by their riders and supervisors to be reci- 
pients of Kramer's incentive awards. 

Receiving checks for $250 
each were bus operators Jean 
Cage, North Park Garage; Ruth 
Neal, 77th Street Garage; Tom 
Lenoir, Washington Garage; 
Felecia Clower, Limits Garage, 
and rail conductors Victor 
Ramirez Jr., North Section, and 
Ronald Overton, 95th Street 
Terminal. 

Riders called operator Cage 
kind and patient and said she 
keeps them well informed. She 
has been a CTA employee since 
1979. Operator Ruth Neal, who 
is also married to a bus operator, 
joined CTA in 1977. She was 
commended for her courtesy, 
particularly toward senior 
citizens. 

Operator Thomas Lenoir joined 
CTA in 1957. He has been a 
Special Services bus operator for 
the disabled since 1981. Riders on 
his bus wrote of his friendly rap- 
port, positive attitude and deep 

concern for them. Riders also said 
Felecia Clower, a bus operator 
since 1978, "cheerfully greets all 
her passengers and shows con- 
cern for their well being." 

Rapid transit riders commend- 
ed conductor Victor Ramirez Jr. 
for being courteous and helpful, 
and for always having a friendly 
"hello." Ramirez began his CTA 
service in 1975. Rapid transit 
conductor Ronald Overton is 
regarded by his riders as "excep- 







Felecia Clower 



Operator Ruth Neal, 77th Street Garage, accepts an incentive 
award check for $250.00 from Interim RTA Chairman John 
Kramer. Riders commended Ms. Neal for her courtesy, particular- 
ly toward senior citizens. 

tionally concerned" about their 

safety, and noted that he has 

ordered unruly passengers of his 

train. Overton began his CTA 

career in 1969. and has been a 

rapid transit conductor since 

1975. 

In his final incentive awards 

presentation, Kramer donated 

$5,250 of his RTA salary to 21 

employees representing CTA 

and 14 other RTA transit proper- 

.»■ • r. i ties. 

Victor Ramirez Jr. 

The awards virtually depleted 
the $9,000 fund which had been 
established with money that 
otherwise would have gone to 
pay the interim RTA chairman's 
$l,000-a-month salary. Kramer 
accepted no pay from the time 
he was named to the RTA chair- 
manship last November. 

The money was used to 
reward a total 35 employees, Ronald Overton 

and to bring a trainload of visually impaired children to the 
Loop during the Christmas season. 

"When I began this program," said Kramer, "I said it had 
two purposes: to reward employees who make an extra ef- 
fort to serve the public, and to raise the level of service 
throughout the RTA system. 

"We have rewarded some, but by no means all, of the top 
employees." 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Ticket agent is named 
WBBM Citizen of Week 




CTA ticket agent Shirley Knight has a lot to smile about as she 
recalls the success she had giving up smoking. The money she 
formerly spent for cigarettes is now used to buy television sets for 
the elderly. 

Old habits die hard, especially bad ones. Seldom do they 
turn into anything beneficial to anyone, or positive in any 
respect. However, occasionally there are exceptions as the 
case of CTA ticket agent Shirley Knight. 

When Mrs. Knight decided to quit smoking, it was a long, 
slow process, but she succeeded. As a gesture of her faith 
and gratefulness that she was victorious over the dreaded 
tobacco, she now contributes the money she literally blew 
away in smoke to the poor and elderly. 

Co-worker Jodie Bien was so impressed by Mrs. Knight 
that she suggested her as a subject for WBBM Radio per- 
sonality Maria Munoz's Citizen of the Week program. 
Following is a partial transcription of the radio interview bet- 
ween Munoz and Mrs. Knight: 

Munoz: "Here is a unique solution to a bad 
habit. Shirley Knight, a ticket agent for the 
CTA, wanted to quit smoking and tried various 
methods, but to no avail. When she found a 
plan that worked, she was so thankful shed 
kicked the habit that she promised to do 
something positive with the money she saved. 

"Through the H.O.M.E. Organization 
(Housing Opportunities and Maintenance for 
the Elderly), she learned of senior citizens liv- 
ing alone, often without any communication 
from the outside world. So she took her so- 
called cigarette monev and bought small televi- 
sion sets for them. " 

Knight: "My husband and I decided that 
with the money I save each month we'd buy a 
12-inch black and white TV. Some of these 
old people don't even have radios, much less 
a TV. Some of them can't go out." 
Munoz learned that Mrs. Knight has also been a volunteer 
visitor with Little Brothers of the Poor for the last eight years. 



As a volunteer, she visits two elderly ladies on a regular 
basis. She runs errands for them, shops, drives them to and 
from their appointments, and visits and spends time with 
them. 

The 35-year CTA veteran told the moderator, that she 
and her carpenter husband, Robert, share a very special 
time with the residents of a nursing home. 

Knight: "We were married on Christmas 
Eve, and we have our anniversary party in the 
nursing home. We donate the cake, and they 
donate the champagne and the little hors 
d'oeuvres. We have a nice anniversary party at 
the Brightview Nursing Home every Christmas 
Eve. " 
Although she has a full-time job and family to keep her 
busy, she still finds time to share. 

Knight: "I'm going to get old someday, and 
1 hope that someone is there. I hope someone 
is there volunteering for an organization that 
will help me. You're needed. There are a lot 
of old people out there who are very lonely, 
and you get so much more out of this than 
you put into it. " 
Although she is very appreciative of the honor bestowed 
upon her as Citizen of the Week, Shirley Knight was quick 
to laud Jodie Bien as well and Mary Rafftery. her two ticket 
agent co-workers, for the assistance they have given her 
with her volunteer work. 

"Once I was unable to deliver packages at Christmas for 
'Little Brothers', and Mary made the deliveries for me," said 
Knight. "She delivered 100 packages to various locations, 
taking 10 packages at a time." 



New bus garage contract 




CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli (right), signs a contract 
for the $25,686,000 construction of a new bus garage at 
103rd Street and Stony Island Avenue by the Klein Con- 
struction Company of Westmont. IL, lowest of 10 bidders. 
Affixing a signature to the document on behalf of the builder 
is Dwayne Klein, president of Klein Construction. The con- 
tract provided for a separate salt storage facility, complete 
improvements of the 18.5 acre site, employee and visitor 
parking lots, a bus turnaround, and a bus staging area. Con- 
struction time as set forth in the contract is 920 calendar 
days, or about 2'/2 years. Funds for the new facility are be- 
ing provided by the Illinois Department of Transportation 
and the Urban Mass Transportation Administration. 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 9 & 10 



Commendation Corner 



Junior Broadbent (Forest 
Glen garage) caught the atten- 
tion of Laura Leonard who 
works in Deerfield, for his 
courtesy as operator ot a No. 
84 Peterson bus. "For a long 
time now riders on the Peter- 
son line have enjoyed his 
courteous treatment and kindly 
supervision. I'm a senior 
citizen and grateful for our 
driver's consideration in watch- 
ing for me in case I am 
prevented by traffic from 
reaching the bus stop in time. 
He greets everyone with unfail- 
ing good humor, and watches 
at north-south transfer points 
to see if people are trying to 
catch his bus. He is the kind 
of driver the CTA can well be 
proud of. " 



Garrick Turner (West Section) was noticed by Gis Red- 
mond, of Clarendon Hills, for the way he handled his job 
as conductor of a Congress-O'Hare train. "He had a 
voice that should be heard on the radio. He called out 
each stop clearly, but what set him apart was not only his 
voice, but his wonderful commentary. His good humor 
and thoughtful words made everyone smile. He remind- 
ed riders of the time, the train rules, and the good feelings 
we get from being kind to our fellow riders. At each stop 
he commented on that area of the city, and what land- 
marks we'd see getting off there. 1 can't express how plea- 
sant a ride that was." 

Stanley Kubicz (Forest Glen garage) is appreciated by 
Angela McAlester, of North Damen Avenue, who was a 
regular rider on his No. 84 Peterson bus. "Not only is he 
a careful and competent driver (he's almost never late or 
early), but his personality is warm, good-natured and 
cheerful. He has a kind word, a joke, or a hello for all of 
his passengers. Both my husband and 1 took the bus at 
different times in the mornings, and each of us soon 
developed a friendly rapport with the driver. After a time, 
we discovered we were talking about the same man. 
When you have a great bus driver, you feel good all 
day." 

Jean Cage (North Park garage) was the operator of a 
No. 145 Wilson/Michigan Express bus ridden by Luella 
Spangler, of Wilson Avenue. "She greeted us with 'Good 
morning. How are you?' I asked her to call Washington, 
and she said, 'I call all stops,' which she did. Everyone 
got a greeting. Our bus got so crowded she could not take 
any more on. When my stop was comming up, she said, 
'Lady who wanted Washington. Washington is the next 
stop.' She told me, 'Be careful, and take your time,' and 
'Have a good day.' 1 thanked her. She make my day hap- 
py. Sometimes we older people like to be cheered up. 
She was great!" 




Robert Thomas (North Park 
garage) was commended by 
Valentina Lopushok, who 
rode his No. 147 Outer Drive 
Express bus to her office on 
North Michigan Avenue. 
"This driver is always con- 
siderate enough to look 
around for anyone running 
for his bus, and kind enough 
to wait for them. In answer- 
ing questions regarding 
directions, he extends 
himself with as much infor- 
mation as he can with a 
pleasant and patient man- 
ner. Although he takes time 
to be pleasant and polite, he 
also maintains a profes- 
sional attitude and stays on 
sqhedule. I can always de- 
pend on reaching my 
destination on time when I 
am on his bus." 



Rochelle Miller (South Section) impressed Gerald 
Nicholas, of East 111th Street, with her performance as 
conductor of a Lake/Dan Ryan train. "She gave every 
impression that she was concerned for the passengers. 
Her voice was warm and friendly. She bid all those 
departing the train to 'Have a nice day,' and clearly an- 
nounced the stops. Over the years of riding the CTA, 1 
have not found many to rival this young woman. I cer- 
tainly was appreciative of her style, and was glad to be on 
that particular train. The CTA would certainly be more 
pleasurable to ride if there were more people obviously 
happy about doing their jobs." 

Donald Reed (Beverly garage) won the approval of 
Odella Hamb, of West 67th Place, for his assistance one 
Sunday on a 111th Street bus. "I needed instructions to 
my destination. Mr. Reed is courteous, patient, and 
knows his job. He explained to me the quickest route I 
could have taken. Two drivers before I boarded his bus 
did not know how to get to 119th and Michigan. Mr. 
Reed took time to explain the way 1 should go, and saw 
to it by calling my attention to the stop. Courtesy, pa- 
tience, kindness and politeness are very essential, and 
rate high in my book. He makes it a pleasure to ride 
CTA " 

Minnie Davis (North Avenue garage) was thanked by 
R. Swarts, of North Lake Shore Drive, for providing 
special assistance to her sister while operating a No. 76 
Diversey bus. "Because of a broken hip, which 
necessitates the use of a cane, my sister finds it difficult to 
get on and off the bus. Ms. Davis, recognizing this the 
other day, escorted my sister to the bus, and got her up 
the steps and comfortably seated. She also pulled up to 
the curb when we were ready to alight. Ms. Davis' con- 
cern was one of the kindest acts either my sister of I have 
ever experienced as CTA riders. She is an asset to your 
organization." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Customer assistance, 
West shops workers 
help recover ring 

Actress Debbie Leeds wasn't acting 
July 26 when she met the three CTA 
employees whose efforts led to the 
recovery of her gold and pearl ring 
from the bottom of a subway air shaft. 
She thanked them with obvious 
gratitude. 

Mrs. Leeds said that she and her 
husband. Arthur, were walking to their 
car near Chicago avenue and State 
street on July 23 following her ap- 
pearance in a production at the Ran- 
dolph Street Gallery. Before the show 
she gave the ring to her husband for 
safe keeping. He slipped it into his 
pocket with his car keys. 

Stepping onto the air shaft grating. 
Leeds pulled out his car keys, and 
unknowingly, the ring. He heard 
something hit the grating and didn't 
give it a second thought. When they 
arrived home and she asked for her 
ring, he gave it a second thought. It 
wasn't where he thought it was. 

On July 24, Mrs. Leeds telephoned 
the CTA's Customer Assistance Office 




Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Leeds show off ring that fell into subway vent shaft at Chicago 
avenue and State street. Couple are flanked by Carroll Dalton (far left), CTA sheet metal 
worker, and Donald Regan, CTA tinner, who were dispatched to locate Mrs. Leed's pearl 
and gold ring. 



and anxiously told her story to service 
representative Harry Brooks. 

Brooks contacted West Shops and 
on July 25 Carroll Dalton, sheet metal 
worker, and Donald Regan, tinner, 
were dispatched to the air shaft where 
they located the ring, 

That same day Brooks contacted 
Mrs. Leeds with the good news and in- 



vited her and her husband to be at the 
Public Affairs office the following day. 
"The ring isn't terribly expensive." 
Leeds said. "No," chimed in his happy 
wife, "but its sentimental value can't be 
measured in mere money. It's the first 
ring Arthur ever gave me and this is 
the last time it will be out of my sight," 
she vowed. 



Thanks for a job well done 



Employees who have received commendations from the public 



Rosa Alfaro, Forest Glen 
Rogelio Arrazola, North Park 

Gregory Barber, North Park 
Otis Bames, 77th Street 
Alfredo Barrios, Archer 
James Beal Jr., Kedzie 
Hudson Black, Limits 
Nikola Blagojevic, Limits 
Havard Blanks, Kedzie 
Vicki Bledsoe, Howard/Kimball 
Dwayne Boroin, Limits 
Junior Broadbent, Forest Glen 
Charles Brown, Kedzie 
Henry Brown, Payroll Acctg. 
Claude Brown Jr., Archer 
Matthew Brownlee, District B 
William Brownlie, Forest Glen 

Jean Cage, North Park 
George Calhoun, 69th Street 
John Cameron, Ashland 
Sergio Candelaria, Limits 
Leroy Can, Forest Glen 
Marvin Chachere, North Park 
Al Clayton, Archer 
Felicia Clower, Limits 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
James Cockrell. Limits 
James Crockett, West Section 

Albert Davies, North Park 
Electra DeAlba. North Avenue 
Herman Duffin, Forest Glen 



August Elke, Archer 
Mattie Elkins, Rail System 

William Finley Jr., North Avenue 
James Fitzgerald, Limits 
Gary Folken, North Section 

Anthony Gibson, District D 
Walter Gibson Jr., Archer 
Larry Goffer, Limits 
Wallacene Good, Forest Glen 
Odell Granger, Forest Glen 
Noble Graves, Limits 
John Gray, 77th Street 
Andrew Gray, 69th Street 
Bobby Griffin, Archer 

Niki Hansen, Forest Glen 
Obeddie Hawkins, Jefferson Park 
Arthur Hawkins Jr., North Avenue 
Olivia Hewitt, 77th Street 
George Hiensman II, 69th Street 
Jimmie Hill, 69th Street 
Donald Hudson, Forest Glen 
Willie Hunt, Kedzie 
Ernest Hunter, Beverly 

Nathan Jackson. 77th Street 
Willie Jefferson, 77th Street 
Mary Johnson, North Section 
Ronald Jones, 69th Street 
Betty Jones, Limits 
James Jones Jr., Kedzie 



Assunta Kaya, Forest Glen 
Dean Kellum, Jefferson Park 
Young Kim, Kedzie 
James Kolstad, Beverly 
Robert Kremer, North Park 

Margie Laboy, North Avenue 
Ruben Lopez, North Park 
Wayne Luster, Limits 

Eleanore Madrecki, Forest Glen 
Patrick Meaney, Douglas /Congress 
Salaheddeen Mohammed, North 
Avenue 

Howard Monroe, North Park 
Jack Moore, North Park 
Frederick Moore, North Park 
Delfino Morales, Kedzie 
James Moses Jr., North Avenue 
Heriberto Munoz, North Park 

Sammie Newell, Rail Dist West 
James Nielsen, Archer 
Stanley Nolan, North Avenue 

Ronald Overton, Ashland 

Charles Patton, Limits 

Juan Perez, Limits 

Lillie Pope, South Section 

Victor Ramirez Jr., Howard Kimball 

George Raniszewski, Forest Glen 

J. Rice. 69th Street 

Annie Rice. Limits 

Robert Richardson, North Park 



Eugenio Rivera. North Avenue 
Chester Robertson. Archer 

Salvatore Scurti, North Section 
Gregory Shelby, Limits 
Leevon Skinner. 69th Street 
Robert Smith. Forest Glen 
Terry Smoczynski. Forest Glen 
Luis Sosa. Archer 
Nathaniel Stevens Jr.. North Park 
Linda Stewart. Limits 
Dwayne Stinson, Limits 
Cheryl Stitts. 77th Street 
Carl Suddeth. North Park 

Wendell Talbert. North Park 
Earl Terry. North Avenue 
Henry Terry. Special Services 
Robert Thomas. North Park 
Lee Thompson. North Park 
Eugene Thurmond. District A 
Reginald Tolbert. North Park 
Blanca Torres. Forest Glen 
Eddie Traylor III. 69th Street 

Lonnie Walker. North Park 
Adolphus Walker Jr.. North Avenue 
Barbara Ware. 77th Street 
Gary Williams. North Park 

James Yancey. Limits 
Kazimer Yaworski. Forest Glen 
Charles Young. Douglas Congress 

Edward Zamiar, North Park 
Theresa Zamora. Kedzie 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 9 & 10 





Tlgg&co- 



et» 



t\o" 




Mae Woodard, Douglas Ter- 
minal -"Ticket Agent TieUp 
was exciting. It let me know 
how good I can be under 
pressure. I have never actually 
experienced that kind of 
pressure in a real work situa- 
tion which we encountered in 
the competition. It pays to be 
calm and do your best. 





Linda Woods ■ Howard (Agent 
Supervisor) - 2nd Place "I had 
a lot of fun. I'm glad my agent 
supervisor (Mary Marble), and 
my husband (Limits instructor 
Myron Woods) encouraged 
me to participate. I enjoyed 
every minute of this competi- 
tion. It's good to know that 
ticket agents are being includ- 
ed, and I hope we will have 
more participation next year." 



Josephine (Jody) Bien 
■Howard ■ 3rd Place "The 
TieUp made me go back and 
study, and really get into the 
job. I think the preliminaries 
were nerve wracking, but the 
final was more like what ticket 
agents do. It was fun just 
meeting so many ticket 
agents from other areas. The 
camaraderie was good. I'm 
glad ticket agents were given 
recognition." 




lTK. 



Syed Alimuddin ■ Jefferson 
Park "It was very interesting 
competition. I am happy that 
CTA gave us the chance to do 
this because it is uplifting for 
ticket agents. It was really like 
a refresher course for us, and 
certainly a nice idea. It in- 
dicated that management 
knows our problems." 




Kenneth Chase ■ Kimball "It 

was more difficult than I 
thought it would be, but I think 
it is a very good idea. Whoever 
thought of knocking on the 
agent's window during the 
competition had the right idea 
because that really happens 
in the course of a day's work. 
My advice to anyone looking 
to next year would be to stay 
cool and calm. I was more ner- 
vous that I thought I would 
be." 




Mary Parish • Desplaines "It 

was fun. It really got serious 
during the second phase 
where we were working as 
ticket agents do, carrying out 
the many responsibilities as 
are required in a ticket agent's 
booth." 




Ricca James -Howard "Ticket 
Agent TieUp was very ex- 
citing. It's good to let others 
know there are some good 
agents out there. As the 
North Section champion, I 
received a trophy which I can 
cherish and which I show to 
my friends. I have a job in 
which people depend upon 
me for service, and which I en- 
joy." 



John Anderson - Howard "I 

thought it was nice. This com- 
petition has built morale 
among the ticket agents, and 
everybody has had a good 
time. It was also a relearning 
process. I'm telling people to 
go out and compete next year 
because I know they will enjoy 
it." 




Nancy Quintana • Kimball "It's 
good to feel that someone 
cares about the ticket agents. 
The competition also proved 
that we as ticket agents must 
use our own judgment when 
dealing with any situation. 
You have to fit the job to your 
personality. I got involved in 
this competition because my 
supervisor encouraged me, 
and I'm glad." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



i 




* 

Bryant Alexander • 95th Street Terminal ■ 1st Place 

'Ticket Agent TieUp brought ticket agents to 
light. It was good, enjoyable competition. I had a 
good time, and I'm looking forward to the trip to 
Washington. We will probably have more 
participation next year. I know we have a 
lot of good agents." 



Bryant Alexander of 95th Street 
Terminal, CTA's top ticket agent, 
was among special guests attending 
the American Public Transportation 
Association convention in Washing- 
ton during October. 

The nine-year veteran ticket agent 
topped nine other 'Tree Wheeling" 
finalists in the CTA's Ticket Agent 
TieUp competition with 593 points. 
The all-expenses paid trip for two to 
the nation's capital and a trophy 
were the coveted prizes. 

Linda Woods of Howard Terminal 
garnered 551 points to take the sec- 
ond place trophy and a $500 Series 
EE Savings Bond. Josephine (Jody) 
Bien, also of Howard Terminal, took 
the third place trophy, and a $200 
savings bond with 535 points. 

Alexander was also champion of 
the South Section. Others were Syed 
Alimuddin, West Section champion, 
and Ricca James, North Section 
champion. Harry Reddrick, deputy 
executive director, Operations, and 
Elonzo Hill, manager, Training/- 
Instruction, presented the section 
champions with plaques to honor 
them for their achievements. 

Other finalists were Nancy Quin- 
tana, Kimball Terminal; John Ander- 
son, Howard Terminal; Mary Parish, 
Desplaines Terminal; Mae Woodard, 
54th Street Terminal, and Kenneth 
Chase, Kimball Terminal. Each 
finalist received a jacket with the 
CTA logo, a brass identification tag, 
and dinner/theater tickets for two. 



All of the section level contestants 
received a special recognition cer- 
tificate and a tote bag with the CTA 
logo. 

The Ticket Agent TieUp is the first 
competition conducted by the Opera- 
tions Division for non-operating 
employees, and the first of its kind 
within the transit industry. 

Sam Smith, assistant superinten- 
dent. Operations Training Center, 
and Ticket Agent TieUp chairman, 
said that of the approximately 650 
CTA employees working as ticket 
agents, 21 percent applied for the 
"TieUp" competition. Smith said 54 
percent of those applying to par- 
ticipate in the maiden "TieUp" event 
met all requirements for contest 
eligibility and actually participated. 

The criteria for competition re- 
quired each contestant to have had 
an excellent work record in the 
preceding 12 months, to have work- 
ed a minimum of 200 days as an 
agent in that period, and to have 
had two years continuous service as 
a full-time permanent agent. 

Smith said the contest was design- 
ed to demonstrate job skills, improve 
morale, and promote good 
passenger relations and profes- 
sionalism. 

Section level competition included 
both written and performance tests 
on standard operating procedures, 
rules and regulations, job duties, and 
responsibilities. Contestants were re- 
quired to complete these tests before 



participating in the final performance 
test given later at the Merchandise 
Mart ticket agent booth. 

This one-hour performance ex- 
amination included opening a sta- 
tion, collecting and registering 
assorted fares, and handling various 
situations that required a high degree 
of agent expertise and judgment. 

Participants were also examined 
on closing a station including, among 
other steps, bagging receipts, com- 
pleting the agent's report, and proper 
handling of transfers and transfer 
envelopes. Likewise, they were 
tested on completing miscellaneous 
report and other related forms. 

The "Free Wheeling" 10 were 
competing for prizes as well as the 
satisfaction of being among the best 
ticket agents employed by CTA 

The Ticket Agent TieUp was im- 
plemented by Elonzo Hill, manager. 
Training/Instruction, by direction of 
Deputy Executive Director, Opera- 
tions, Harry Reddrick. Hill named 
Operations Training Center Assistant 
Superintendent Sam Smith chairman 
of the new program. 

Selected as sub-committee chair- 
man to assist the Ticket Agent TieUp 
chairmen were: Delia Richards, 
prizes and awards; Cynthia Florence, 
testing; Jimmie Seymour, materials 
and equipment: Karen Miller, 
eligibility; Tessa Gaines, volunteer 
services; Rosemary Roberson, 
budget, and Barbara Colwell, publici- 
ty. Agent instructors served as com- 
petition judges. 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 9 & 10 



9 



Awards banquet 
honors elite group 
of winners 



CTA's top four bus operators receive 

trophies awarded in the 1984 Bus Roadeo. 

They are (from left) Ladell Jackson, North 

Avenue, fourth place; John Odom, 69th 

Street, third place; Joe Rodenski, Forest 

Glen, second place; and Michael Matas, 

Forest Glen, first place. 





Ticket Agent TieUp champion Bryant Alexander accepts the first place winner's cup from 
Alex Johnson, manager, Operations Personnel, as Sam Smith (far left), event chairman, 
and Deputy Executive Director Harry Reddrick (right) express approval. 




O'Hare Terminal motorman James Hentz (left), and Howard Terminal conductor John 
Zupko Jr., show off their first place trophies, proving that teamwork is possible no matter 
where personnel are assigned. Alex Johnson (left), manager, Operations Personnel, and 
Harry Reddrick, deputy executive director, Operations, share the special moment with the 
first place rail team. 



"It's quite an honor to be number 
one, and to be part of this elite group," 
was the comment of CTA's top rail 
conductor, John Zupko, Jr. after col- 
lecting a first place trophy and a trip for 
two to the annual APTA convention. 

It was typical of the attitude and the 
atmosphere generated by all of the 
honorees being recognized at the 
fourth annual CTA awards banquet 
honoring the successful Bus Roadeo, 
Third Rail Roundup, and Ticket Agent 
TieUp participants. 

In a lighter fashion, CTA's first con- 
ductor who began his transit career 
five years ago, told the audience of 
some 200 employees, family members 
and friends, "Life is in alphabetical 
order, and with my name beginning 
with Z-U, I've always been last until 
now. It took me 26 years, but I'm final- 
ly first." 

Earlier, Zupko had praised the 
teamwork of himself and his motor- 
man, James Hentz, noting that people 
from different sections often have dif- 
ferent ways of doing things. "We had 
two people from different sections 
who worked together very well and 
got the job done." said the Howard 
Street conductor. Howard Terminal 
also produced lasted year's first place 
motorman. 

James Hentz, the other half of the 
Third Rail Roundup winning team, 
told the M&M Club audience, "I told 
Mr. Reddrick and Mr. Hill in this very 
room last year that I would be gunning 
for number one." 

Michael Matas, the 1984 Bus 
Roadeo winner, vowed to go to 
Washington and "show them how we 

(continued on page 14) 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Motorman James Hentz (background), and conductor John Zupko, Jr. (foreground), top 
crewmen in the 1984 Third Rail Roundup competition, prepare their train for service. 




Hamp Johnson (left), motorman representing Harlem Terminal, and his conductor, John 
Rigoni of O'Hare Terminal, disuss procedure with clerk Tyrone Brown, 95th Street Ter- 
minal prior to the Third Rail Roundup. Johnson and Rigoni took second place in the 
overall competition. 



Third rail roundup 

participants 

say contest is 

beneficial 



Operations officials are encouraging 
CTA rail transportation personnel to 
begin preparing now for the 1985 
Third Rail Roundup. The goal next 
year is to increase participation in the 
Third Rail Roundup as well as the 
Ticket Agent TieUp contest. 

Contest participants in this year's 
competition called the Third Rail 
Roundup a good idea because it 
sparked job pride and recognition and 
was an incentive to brush up on 
operating procedures. Most claimed 
the competition sent them back to 
study their manuals and SOPs over a 
little midnight oil. 

Conductor Martin Kane of Howard 
Terminal called the Third Rail Round- 
up a good review and said he believes 
it makes participants better employees 
whether or not they collect prizes. 

In 1983, CTA became the first 
municipal transit property in the 
American Public Transit Association 
(APT A), and to date the only public 
transportation organization in the 
history of the industry, to conduct a 
rail roadeo. That effort was followed in 
1984 by a competition for ticket 
agents. 

Elonzo Hill, manager. Training/ 
Instruction, said that, like the Bus 
Roadeo, and the new Ticket Agent 
TieUp competition, the Third Rail 
Roundup is one of the best ways rail 
service employees may demonstrate 
their professional skills and earn 
industry-wide recognition. 

Eligibility for the Third Rail Round- 
up requires applicants to be full-time 
operating employees with good work 
records. Conductor applicants must 
have at least a year of continuous ser- 
vice and must have worked a minimun 
of 200 days as a conductor within the 
preceding 12 months. If a towerman. 
the applicant must have worked a 
minimum of 10 days as a conductor 
within the past 12 months. 

On the other hand, motorman con- 
test applicants must have had at least 
two years of continuous service, must 
have qualified as a motorman at least 

(contin ued on page 1 4) 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 9 & 10 



11 






Joel Hawthorne, conductor, 
Howard Terminal — "I like 
the idea. The concept of com- 
petition between employees is 
good because in each section 
things are done differently, so 
you have a chance to learn from 
each other I know now what I 
missed last year. I want to enter 
the contest next year." 




Richard Crane, motorman, 
Ashland Terminal — "I was 

very glad to be one of the top 
nine motormen in the Round- 
house 18. The competition was 
an opportunity to show my 
skills. I was taking notes this 
year as I went along because I 
intend to enter the competition 
next year, and do a lot better." 




Roman Doubek, motorman, 
Douglas Terminal — "The 
team concept made this year's 
competition more realistic. I did 
find a few surprises which I was 
not quite ready for this time, but 
all in all. it was good clean fun. 
It's good for the employee 
because it gives you a chance to 
meet different people." 



Napolion Simmons, motor- 
man, Howard Terminal — 

"The Third Rail Roundup helps 
the individual to be more aware 
of the things they should be do- 
ing, and makes you familiar 
with the proper job procedures. 
The Third Rail Roundup is good 
competition." 




I Limp Johnson, motorman, 
Harlem Terminal — "It was a 

different competition this year 
with the team system, and the 
lottery method for selecting a 
partner which worked out very 
well. Team work is the key. I 
think the Third Rail Roundup is 
a very good way to prove your 
skills. I enjoyed being a part of 
it " 



San Juana M. Montes de 
Oca, conductor, Kimball 
Terminal — "I was shocked, 
but pleasantly surprised that I 
made the Roundhouse 18. I 
was really competing against 
myself and seeking the self- 
satisfaction of getting in touch 
with procedures. The Third Rail 
Roundup is a great opportunity 
to get in touch with CTA pro- 
cedures." 




John Zupko, Jr., conductor, 
Howard Terminal — "It was 

fun, and I was proud to be a 
part of it. After all, you're talking 
about the top nine conductors. I 
like the team concept which in 
the case of myself and Mr 
Hentz, matched up two people 
from different sections, and we 
got the job done." 




Richard Corbett, conduc- 
tor, Kimball Terminal - "The 
competition is a good idea 
because it rekindles pride in the 
job. There is nothing wrong with 
having a sense of pride in one's 
job. I think as time goes on, and 
the Third Rail Roundup con- 
tinues, more and more people 
will come out and participate. 1 
would like to see more people 
put the skepticism aside." 




tion was I 
shooting. II 
you left thil 
was bad ord*. 
dup makes < 
do my best, 



72 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 





f motorman, 

111 - "The 

|iup is very 

't know if it 

arge margin, 

ready for 

ticed some 

I spent a lot 

my instruc- 



■ notorman. 
(terminal — 

■ orman and 
It this year 
fihe competi- 
3v trouble- 
Ijie moment 
Bal, the train 
*l i Rail Roun- 
Wip and try to 




John Rigoni, conductor, 
OHare Terminal — "I saw an 

opportunity to show my skills. 
The Third Rail Roundup gives 
the employee recognition, and 
makes one feel good about the 
job. It also makes you feel good 
to know that we were in it to the 
end." 




Marvin Kelsey, conductor, 
95th Street Terminal — 

"This was my first time in the 
Third Rail Roundup I entered 
because I like competition as 
well as the chance for recogni- 
tion. I consider myself a trend 
setter, and I thought it was 
maybe a chance to help get rid 
of some of the negative job at- 
titudes, and to review job pro- 
cedure." 

1984 Vol. 37 ■ Nos. 9 & 10 




Pat Rhoden, conductor, 
Ashland Terminal — "The 
Third Rail Roundup gave me a 
chance to review procedures. I 
like to get paid well, so I do my 
pb well. I think everybody 
should take pride in their job. I 
would tell anyone thinking 
about the Third Rail Roundup 
that it isn't hard." 




Otha Miller, motorman, 
Kimball Terminal — "It was 

very enjoyable, and a good 
thing for the employee. It would 
be good if more people would 
participate because I think a 
thing like the Third Rail Round- 
up can improve the employee's 
attitude. Attitude makes the dif- 
ference. The Third Rail Round- 
up for me was very good I en- 
joyed it very much." 




Leon Hegwood, motorman. 
Howard Terminal — "The 
Third Rail Roundup pitted what 
I knew against what others 
knew about the job. I worked 
hard, and finished in a respec- 
table position and I can hold my 
head up. One thing about this 
competition, it will make you 
see your shortcomings " 




Martin Kane, conductor, 
Howard Terminal — 'The 

Third Rail Roundup is a good 
idea It's really a good review 
and it makes you a better 
employee even if you don't win. 
I find that the competition is 
more difficult than the real work 
situation because you are used 
to people as passengers, but in a 
competition you are more self- 
conscious." 




Daryl Brown, conductor, 
95th Street Terminal - I 

thought the Third Rail Roundup 
would be easy, but it was not as 
easy as I believed it would be I 
learned a lot of things about the 
pb which I did not know before. 
I know where I went wrong this 
time, and I hope to capitalize on 
the mistakes next year 




Gideon Stevens, motorman, 
Ashland Terminal — 'The 
Third Rail Roundup was fun 
and challenging, but not a piece 
of cake, I like the way the pro- 
blems were set up It was a 
chance to demonstrate my 
skills I think that it is a great 
thing for both CTA and the 
employees because it gives the 
employee an added incentive " 



13 



Heroic deed recognized 




Gerald Poces (left), warehouse worker 
II, and Lawrence Tischer, unit super- 
visor, both of Storeroom 30 at South 
Shops, received letters of appreciation 
from E. W. Tobin, manager, Materials 
Management/Purchasing Agent, for 
their efforts to extinguish a roof fire on 
a shop building on June 7. By the time 
the Chicago Fire Department arrived, 
the two had quelled the blaze, preven- 
ting further damage to the building. 



■Awards banquet 

(continued from page 10) 

do things in Chicago." Matas, a close 
contender in previous contests, 
unseated John Odom of 69th Street 
Garage, the Bus Roadeo champion of 
1982 and 1983. 

In a style similar to a "Night of the 
Oscar" fashion, Bryant Alexander 
thanked his supervisor, and all who 
supported the Ticket Agent TieUp 
competition in which he took the first 
place cup. "Way to go southside," 
Alexander exclaimed as he left the 
rostrum. The ticket agent competition 
was the first such contest to be con- 
ducted anywhere in the transit in- 
dustry. 

Other honorees recongized with 
special certificates and other memen- 
toes were members of the Bus Roadeo 
Winning Circle 20, the Third Rail 
Roundhouse 18, and the Ticket Agent 
TieUp Freewheeling 10. 

Operations chiefs, honorees and 
their guests heard Executive Director 
Bernard J. Ford bestow accolades 
upon the competition participants as 
he remarked, "We are proud of you. 
We are number one because of you, 
and we want you to know that we are 
grateful for your efforts. 

"We're not only number one in the 
nation, but in the world. I'm proud to 
be a part of it. We're all in this 
together." 

Harry Reddrick, Deputy Executive 
Director, Operations, told honorees, 



"You've motivated your peers and 
you've mirrored a much better image 
to the general public." 

Acknowledging the honorees as 
"Cream of the crop," and the people 
who keep people moving all year, 
Alex Johnson, manager, Operations 
Personnel, borrowed a line from the 
Sisters Sledge as he said, "The best 
thing about it is 'We are Family.'" 

I Third rail roundup 

(contin ued from page 1 1 ) 

12 months prior to the date they 
entered the contest, and must also 
have worked a minimum of 200 days 
including a minimum of 10 days as a 
motorman or switchman, within the 
preceding 12 months. 

Like the initial rail competition of 
1983, the 1984 Third Rail Roundup 
was conducted in two phases — the 
terminal level competition and the 
final competition. 

At terminal level, contestants were 
given a written test on CTA rules and 
procedures, and were judged on 
uniform and appearance. They were 
also given troubleshooting problems, 
and tested on how effectively they 
were able to communicate with the 
controller. Survivors of the terminal 
level competition (Roundhouse 18) 
were then paired by lottery into nine 
conductor-motorman teams for the 
final competition. 

The ultimate contest required each 
team to operate a train over a specially 



designated route. They were judged 
on their knowledge of signals, making 
a turnback, alertness, operating 
through interlocking/curves, door 
operation, making announcements, 
and fare registration. 

Each team was also judged on its 
accuracy of berthing a train, schedule 
adherence, smoothness of operation, 
communication effectiveness with the 
controller, handling transfers, pro- 
viding information to passengers, and 
troubleshooting. 

The top prize in the Third Rail 
Roundup competition was an all- 
expenses paid, five-day, four-night 
trip for two to the nation's capital 
where they attended the annual APTA 
convention. Each member of the first 
place team also received a trophy, and 
their home terminals were each 
awarded a chairman's cup. 

The coveted Third Rail Roundup 
prize for 1984 was earned by motor- 
man James Hentz of O'Hare Ter- 
minal, and his teammate, conductor 
John Zupko Jr., of Howard Terminal. 
They were each accompanied to 
Washington by a guest of their choice. 

Motorman Hamp Johnson of Har- 
lem Terminal, and his teammate, con- 
ductor John Rigoni, also of O'Hare 
Terminal, took second place honors 
and each received a Series EE savings 
bond for $500, and a trophy. The top 
four winners and all members of the 
Roundhouse 18 (see pages 12 and 
13) also received a pair of dinner- 
theater tickets, as well as a distinctive 
belt buckle and shoulder patches bear- 
ing the CTA Third Rail Roundup logo. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Archer tops its 
first quarter safety 
record 



Operating personnel assigned to 
Archer Garage are among CTA's most 
safety conscious as evidenced by their 
second consecutive Public Safety 
Award which they earned for the se- 
cond quarter of 1984. 

Archer, a medium-sized facility of 
some 500 operating personnel located 
on the south side, has now earned 13 
PSA plaques since the Pulbic Safety 
Award program was initiated 23 years 
ago. 

The south side facility had both the 
lowest traffic and passenger accident 
rates in the bus system for the second 
quarter, experiencing 40 accident-free 
days, an improvement over its first 
quarter record when Archer personnel 
took the PSA with 30 accident-free 
days. 

Assistant Superintendent Walter 
Caston, then at Archer, and now 
assigned to 69th Street Garage, had 
urged Archer personnel to continue 
the fine public safety record. Caston 
said Archer would strive to set an ex- 
ample for other locations to follow as it 
continues to earn PSA awards. 

Meanwhile, personnel at Forest 
Park Terminal saw their first PSA since 
the third quarter 1983, and they earn- 
ed it with one of the most enviable 
records since the inception of PSA. 
Forest Park experienced only one ac- 
cident in the second quarter, and had 
90 accident-free days to earn the ter- 
minal the Public Safety Award plaque 
for the second quarter 1984. 




The lowest traffic and passenger accident rate in the bus system means having the 
coveted Interstation Safety Contest plaque on display at Archer Garage where the 
outstanding safety record was achieved. Making the presentation is Michael McCarthy 
(left), principal public safety analyst. Accepting on behalf of Archer Garage is Walter 
Caston, assistant superintendent. 




Forest Park Terminal's enviable record of only one accident and 90 accident-free days 
during the second quarter earned the rail facility the quarterly Interstation Safety Contest 
plaque. Making the presentation is Fred Mead (left), director, System Safety Analysis/Per- 
fomance. Accepting on behalf of the terminal is David Curry, terminal superintendent 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 9 & 10 



15 



Garage pick 

is effective as Kedzie 

resumes service 




A bus system seniority pick card with the operator's choice is handed to B 
(standing) by clerk Guy Stuttley for posting on a garage roster 



ill Melli 



Bus clerk Bob Stevens 
assists a bus operator as 
she writes her name on 
the 77th Street roster. 





Frank Zaborowski, system-wide garage pick 
supervisor, checks the Kedzie Garage personnel 
roster for available slots. 



As clerk William Howell called a bus 
operator's name, the operator or 
another clerk would announce the re- 
quested work location. The name is 
then entered on the garage board to fill 
a slot. 

"The bi-annual system-wide garage 
pick conducted at Washington Garage 
July 21-26, was the 30th in CTA 
history . It was an opportunity for every 
CTA bus operator — nearly 5,000 
employees, to decide where they 
would work . " 

On September 9, the effective date 
of the pick, bus routes operating tem- 
porarily out of North Avenue and 
Limits Garages will return to Kedzie 



Garage. Bus routes that operated out 
of Lawndale since the demolition of 
the old Kedzie Car Barn in 1981, 
returned to Kedzie when the new 
garage opened in June. 

The pick gave employees their first 
opportunity to select assignment to the 
new facility which needs 490 
operators. The 321,000 square foot 
garage, valued at $17.6 million, is the 
first new garage CTA has erected in 28 
years. The first garage filled during the 
pick, however, was Limits. Joe Vod- 
varks, superintendent. Administrative 
Services, explained that many 
operators will give first consideration 
to the garage that will give them a 



chance to have the weekend off. 

The pick at Washington was super- 
vised by Frank Zaborowski, a North 
Park clerk. Union Representative 
Albert Strickland, a clerk at Archer, 
was also present to oversee the opera- 
tion and to answer inquiries. "There 
are three ways an operator may be 
represented during the bus garage 
system pick," said Vodvarka. "The in- 
dividual may appear in person to 
make the choice for a work location, 
send in a choice slip, or do nothing 
which would indicate a desire to re- 
main at his or her present location." 

Vodvarka said a slip may be submit- 
ted with as many as 10 choices listed 



16 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



"The bi-annual system-wide garage pick conducted at 
Washington Garage July 21-26, was the 30th in CTA 
history. It was an opportunity for every CTA bus 
operator — nearly 5,000 employees, to decide where 
they would work." 




Bus clerks Guy Stut- 
tley (left), and Bill 
Howell, look over the 
roster of bus operator 
personnel waiting to 
pick a garage location 
as a bus operator 
checks for his place 
on the list. 



Albert Strickland 
(right) Amalgamated 
Transit Union 241 
representative, wat- 
ches as bus clerks 
Guy Stuttley and 
William Howell con- 
duct the bi-annual 
pick. 



in order of preference. "If an 
employee doesn't make a choice dur- 
ing the pick, but is bumped from his or 
her work location due to seniority, we 
are obligated to reassign the individual 
to the garage nearest their present 
work location." 

Each garage requires a specific 
number of operators. Once the quota 
for a garage is filled, assignments to 
that location are stopped. If operators 
are assigned to garages where they 
have never worked before, they are 
required to learn all of the streets from 
the new garages before the effective 
date of the transfer. 

Farrell Gallagher, 69th Street 
Garage, CTA's senior operator 'King 



Casey' who works as a box puller, said 
the opportunity to pick gives garage 
personnel a chance to move around. 
"The pick has changed a bit since I 
joined CTA 38 years ago. There are 
fewer runs so it's a lot easier. When we 
had streetcars, we had a two-minute 
street, but now it's a little more spread 
out," said Gallagher. The veteran bus 
operator is remaining with 69th Street 
Garage after eight years at that loca- 
tion. "It's a good garage," said 
Gallagher who also spent 30 years at 
77th Street. 

"The system pick is different from 
what most people outside Operations 
think it is," said Vodvarka. "It's really 
worth observing." 



McClain aids 
another motorist 
in distress 



John McClain, the Operations 
Training Instructor who received 
notoriety, and the heartfelt thanks of a 
grateful young couple whom he 
rescued last winter from a cold and 
lonely Dan Ryan expressway, has 
again been recognized for coming to 
the aid of a motorist in distress. 

Ms. Marie Jackson, a south side 
resident, detailed, in a letter to CTA 
Chairman Michael Cardilli, how Mc- 
Clain came to her aid on September 
10, after the left front wheel of her 
automobile rolled off her car into the 
morning rush hour traffic, as she was 
en route to work. 

The incident occurred on North 
Lake Shore Drive near LaSalle Street. 
The front of Ms. Jackson's car collaps- 
ed onto the pavement, and she was 
about to proceed on foot, when Mc- 
Clain drove up in his grey and black 
pickup truck. After assessing the situa- 
tion, he retrieved the woman's 
runaway wheel and remounted it for 
her. 

McClain followed Ms. Jackson as 
she continued on her way to work, 
because he wanted to make sure the 
wheel stayed on. As he remounted the 
wheel he noticed that large holes had 
been reamed open due to the turning 
of the wheel with loose lugs. 

The wheel came off again at Fuller- 
ton Avenue. McClain took Ms. 
Jackson to a phone where she con- 
tacted her place of employment and 
called a family member for transporta- 
tion. 

He remained with the woman until 
the family member arrived. He then 
helped with getting a wheel onto the 
car so that it could be removed from 
the street. 

Ms. Jackson said McClain accepted 
nothing more that a "thank you," and 
a handshake and then got in his truck 
and went on his way. In her letter to 
Cardilli, Ms. Jackson said, " — Mr Mc- 
Clain is deserving of any recognition 
he receives. —My family and I will be 
forever grateful to him." 



1984 Vol. 37 - Nos. 9 & 10 



17 




Frank Venezia 
to 61st Street 
with pride. 



(left), director, rail maintenance, presents a first place ZAP certificate 
Terminal foreman Charles Nevels as maintenance workers look on 



John Dutton (left), unit supervisor, bus garages, and 
Andrew Jones, night foreman at Beverly Garage, 
are proud of the first place certificate the southside 
garage earned in the second quarter ZAP competi- 
tion. 




Ron Stevers of DesPlaines Terminal inspects con- 
trollers on this rail car. DesPlaines received a first 
place certificate in the second quarter competition 
of Zero Accident Program. 



A first place ZAP certificate was also earned by five departments at Skokie Shops. 
Represented here is the Blacksmith/Welding dept. Shown are (front row) Jung Kim, 
Ken Blocker, foreman (holding certificate); Rodrigo Silva, Ramon Santana, and B. 
Harvey. Others are Mike Fabian, Frank Vukovics, unit supervisor, and Elmer Fischer. 



18 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



■ CTA maintenance personnel at seven locations were winners in the second 
quarter 1984 Zero Accident Program competition. Certificates of honor were awarded 
to DesPlaines, 61st, 63rd. 54th, and 98th Street terminals, as well as Beverly Garage. 

■ Awards were also presented to five areas of Skokie Shops and six areas of 
Bus Shops at 77th Street. Honored at Skokie were the Blacksmith/Welding 

Shop, Machine, Truck and Axle Shops, and Sub-electrical. 

■ Taking first place certificates at 77th Street Bus Shops were Vehicle Wiring, 
Upholstery, Utility. Electrical Units Rebuild, and the Machine and Print Shops. 

■ Recipients of the luncheon award for having the lowest maintenance accident rate 
in six consecutive months were maintenance workers at 98th Terminal and Forest Glen Garage. 




Foreman Leon Fields (left) proudly accepts a second quarter first A tasty repast is prepared for 98th Street Terminal personnel for 
place ZAP certificate presented by Richard Lorimer, superinten- having the lowest rail maintenance accident rate for six con- 
dent for equipment and maintenance. secutive months. 




Foreman Steve Jackson of 54th 
Street Terminal, surrounded by 
his maintenance crew, holds 
the first place ZAP certificate 
earned for the second quarter. 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 9 & 10 



19 



Open house honors Lemm in retirement 




Donald P. Lemm celebrates retirement after 42 years of service. 
He is joined by his wife, Ida, as Insurance and Pensions depart- 
ment co-workers host an open house in his honor. The large 
plaque is a montage of recorded events which helped to mold his 
career as well as the Lemm family lifestyle over the past 42 years. 



On May 11, 1984, an open house was held in honor of 
the retirement of Donald P. Lemm from CTA after almost 
42 years of service. His co-workers, family and friends 
gathered to wish Don and his wife of 35 years, Ida, the best 
as they began enjoying a life of retirement. 

Don Lemm's career in public transportation began in 
1942 with the Chicago Rapid Transit Company, a CTA 
predecessor. His career has run the gamut from mail clerk to 
rail superintendent and other key management positions. 

Besides the Transportation Department, he served CTA 
in Treasury, Accounting, and Training Departments. He 
was also Administrative Assistant to former CTA Chairman 
George Dement. Prior to his 1982 appointment as Manager 
of Insurance and Pensions, he held the positions of 
Superintendent of Pensions, Director of Workers' Compen- 
sation, and Director of Insurance. 

Lemm earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business 
Administration and Accounting from DePaul University. He 
also attended John Marshall Law School and the Chicago 
School of Insurance. He and his wife are the parents of two 
married sons, Paul and Christopher, and two married 
daughters, Kathleen and Nancy. They also have two grand- 
children, Christopher, Jr. and Dominic. 

Lemm will continue to live in Bellwood where he and his 
wife are active in St. Simeon Parish activities, and where he is 
very active in civic affairs. 



Plaque for retirement 




Michael Kelly (right), senior traction power engineer, accepts a 
special plaque presented upon his retirement, from W.D. (Bud) 
Moore, power supervisor, Distribution. Kelly was honored for his 
25 years of CTA service at a reception held at the Merchandise 
Mart M&M Club. 




Mike Kelly pauses with members of his family during his retire- 
ment reception. Family members are (from left) Kay, Joe, Mary, 
and Mike Kelly; Carole McNicholas, Mike's fiancee; Tom and 
Grace Kelly. 



20 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Employees earn degrees 




Sprinter sets goals 




Diana Blaino, confidential office assis- 
tant. Materials Management, was 
graduated from Northwestern Univer- 
sity with a bachelor of arts degree in 
organizational behavior. 



Kay Smith, medical technician, CTA 
Medical department, was graduated 
from Governors State University with 
a bachelor of arts degree in business. 




St. Ignatius sprinter Mike Sawyer 
finished the track season as the 
Catholic League's state title holder in 
the 100-200 yard dash. The 17-year 
old high school senior is the son of 
Deputy Executive Director. Planning, 
Ernest Sawyer and Claims Administra- 
tion Supervisor Therese Sawyer. The 
youth wants to participate in the 1988 
Olympics set for Korea. His long range 
goal is to attend the U.S. Naval 
Academy at Annapolis. He has aspira- 
tions for becoming a U.S. Navy pilot 







Evanston High School's Wildkits Basketball team displays the numerous trophies earned 
in the 1983-84 season in which it finished as Runners-up for the state championship. The 
team included guard Steve Wool (43), and his brother, Co-captam Louis Wool (44), sons of 
CTA Attorney Leon Wool, Law/Claims Department. Louis is a freshman at Denver Univer- 
sity while Steve is a senior at Evanston. 



1984 Vol. 37- Nos. 9 & 10 



The Wildkits cagers of Evanston 
High School won 32 consecutive 
games last season en route to becom- 
ing state championship runners-up 
and eighth in the final USA Today 
Basketball Prep School ratings. The 
team's 32-1 record was due in large 
measure to the able assistance of 
guards Steve (43) and Louis (44) 
Wool, sons of CTA Attorney Leon 
Wool. Law/Claims Department. 

Co-captain Louis Wool, now a 
freshman at Denver University, led the 
Wildkits last year with his ag- 
gressiveness as a shooter. He aver- 
aged 11.6 points per game . hitting 64 
per cent of the time from the field and 
81 per cent at the foul line . He also set 
a new school record with 150 suc- 
cessful free throws in one season. 
Equally as strong on the boards, he 
grabbed 247 rebounds (116 
offensive). Among other honors, 
Louis received the B'nai B'rith Sports 
Lodge High School Athlete of the 
Year Award. 

Senior Steve Wool, a prospective 
starter, expects another successful 
Wildkits basketball season, and the 
state championship. 



21 



Discus event winner 




James Jakscht, 17, a senior at Gordon 
Technical High School, won the 1984 
Varsity Catholic League Champion- 
ship discus event, and qualified for 
state participation in the downstate 
1984 track and field events. Jakscht is 
the son of Ms. Eunice Jakscht, ex- 
ecutive secretary to CTA Chairman 
Michael A. Cardilli. The youth set a 
new freshman-sophomore Catholic 
League record of 137 feet, 11 inches 
in the 1983 discus event. He won the 
freshman-sophomore shot put event 
the previous year with a toss of 45 
feet, 3 inches. 



Triplets! 



1984 Graduate 




DARREN E. BORUM 

Dunbar Vocational 
Jeanette Borum 

South Shops 



Golden anniversary 




Joseph and Emily Vanek recently 
celebrated their golden wedding anniver- 
sary. The occasion was observed with 
family and friends at the couple's 
Bridgeview, IL home. Vanek retired from 
CTA April 1, 1974 after 38 years. He was 
employed as a motorman, bus operator 
and west section ticket agent. 



,.■■-'■■■.. 




f$ 



Courtney Ann Joshua John Jennifer Lyne 

Mike Marren, bus controller, control 
center, and his wife, Carol, became 
the parents of triplets, two girls and a 
boy, on July 20. The babies were born 
in Christ Community hosiptal. Oak 
Lawn. In order of their introduction to 
this world, they are: Courtney Ann, 
four pounds, 15 ounces, born at 
6:40am; Joshua John, five pounds, 
eight ounces, born 6:41am; and Jen- 
nifer Lyne, five pounds, three ounces, 
born 6:43am. They all measured 
19-inches long. 

The Marrens, who live on the 
Southwest Side, have four other 
children: Carol, 11, Michael III, five, 
Timothy, three, and Katherine, two 
years old. 



Service anniversaries 
in August 

35 Years 

Joseph Irwin, South Shops 
Lewis Kazda, Forest Glen 
James Kelly, Escalator Mtc. 
James O'Neill, Forest Glen 
Walter Piper Jr., Forest Glen 
Alvin Polowczyk, Forest Glen 
John Smith, Beverly 

30 Years 

Raymond Fay, Lawndale 
William Knight, North Park 
Willard Lindsey, Beverly 
John Reid. West Section 
Salvador Perce, Near North 
James Sheldon, Utility 
Pleas Smith, North Park . 
Richard Wilson, Forest Glen 

25 Years 

Joseph Birmingham, Bus Inst 
Junius Blaino, Far South 
Walter Harris, Archer 
Thears Judkins, Schedules 
William Kennedy Jr., Distribution 
Harvey King, 77th Street 
Richard Lafleur, Stores-South 
Robert Lee, Far South 
Edward Mitchell, Operations 
Robert Moskovitz, North Park 
Edwin Oleksy, South Shops 
Loren CRourke, Forest Glen 
Fred Plambek, Dist D 
Curtis Ross, E/H Special Services 
Edward Shields, Support Services 
Daniel Sutton, Support Services 
William Tillery. Gen'l Mtce. 
Johnnie Williams, Ashland Term. 
Albert Wills, 77th Street 



Service anniversaries 
in September 

45 Years 

Peter Janke, Elect. Testing 

35 Years 

George Kacmarek, Utility 
Daniel Martorelli, Claims 
Donald O'Sullivan, Claims 

30 Years 

Paul Kolsch, North Park 

Robert Miller, Archer 

Robert Oesterreich, North Park 

25 Years 

Joseph Christy, North Avenue 

McKinley Davenport, Dist B 

Carl Lewis, Limits 

Henry Luebeck, Prog Impl 

Everett Martin. North Park 

George McCoy, 77th Street 

Ronald Mickels, Bus Service 

Clara Sala, West Section 

William Schmeier Jr., Fac Tech Sevcs 

Richard Smith, Claims 

Joseph Solan Jr., Forest Glen 

Ernest Von Helmes, Forest Glen 

Theodore Washington, Sig., Phone & Radio 

Service anniversaries 
in October 

40 Years 

John Kurgan, South Shops 

35 Years 

James Johnston, Distribution 
Jeffrey Keating, Sig., Phone & Radio 

30 Years 

Robert Arnold, Sig.. Phone & Radio 
Gerald Fels, North Park 
Rod Heffernan. Rev Acctg. 

25 Years 

Bernard Armstrong. Rail Dist West 
Saundra Battles, South Section 
Glen Brunson, Washington 
William Buetow, Investments 
Robert Christmon, Utility 
Melvin Cox, 77th Street 
Robert Fleshman, 77th Street 
Salvatore Gariti, DesPlaines Mtc. 
Joseph Harris, Gen'l Mtc 
Charles James, 69th Street 
George Munyer, Bus Rel. Area 
Bernard Murphy, North Avenue 
Milan Norum, Howard /Kimball 
Patricia Polic, Payroll Acctg. 
Harvey Schneider, Crim. & Traf. Law 
William Sorensen, Washington 
Spelios Verges, Gen'l Mtc. 
Walter Walker Jr., Lawndale 
John Woods, Gen'l Mtc 



New Pensioners for 
August, September 
and October 

ROBERT ADAMS. Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp 7-8-59 
LEROY CARR, Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 7-15-46 
MAGNUS EDGAR Jr., Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 7-19-54 



22 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



HELEN EDWARDS. Ticket Agent. 

North Section. Emp. 11-6-65 
HENRY FULLRIEDE. Sr. Proc. Engr.. 

Materials Management. Emp. 1-24-49 
HARRY GARRETT. Money Handler I. 

South Shops, Emp. 7-19-56 
STANLEY HILLOCK, Bus & Truck Mech.. 

South Shops. Emp. 10-19-47 
VELMA HUSBAND. Ticket Agent. 

South Section, Emp. 6-6-59 
LACY JACKSON, Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 7-19-54 
PATRICK JUDGE. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 3-23-59 
MICHAEL KELLY. Project Manager, 

Fac. Engr. & Maint . Emp. 7-13-59 
FRANK KLEICH Jr., Motorman, 

Kimball. Emp. 11-26-45 
MAX KUCHAN Jr., Carpenter. 

South Shops. Emp 4-9-47 
LANGLEY LYKINS, Asst Supt.. 

South District. Emp. 2-24-49 
JOSEPH MARKOS. Rail Clerk. 

Jefferson Park, Emp. 1-16-46 
PAUL PSIK. Carpenter, 

South Shops. Emp 5-14-64 
STANLEY PSZCZOLA. Bus & Truck Mech . 

South Shops, Emp 2-28-45 
LLOYD RAMSEY. Janitor. 

Limits, Emp. 6-20-57 
CHARLES ROBERSON. Janitor, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 8-10-53 
DONALD RUROEDE. Shopman I. 

Rail Shops. Emp. 4-4-48 
DANIEL SAGEL, Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 6-1-71 
CLIFTON SERVANT. Bus Operator. 

77th Street, Emp. 8-28-47 
FRANK SPROVIERI. Carpenter Leader. 

South Shops, Emp. 12-12-52 
THOMAS SOUTHERN. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 11-20-58 
RALEIGH STAMPER. Bus Repairer. 

Archer. Emp 7-25-50 
ROBERT WATKINS. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 5-20-57 
SAMUEL WILLIAMS. Bus Operator. 

77th Street, Emp. 5-22-51 

Disability Retirements 

HERBERT BRYANT. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 5-27-63 
CURTIS COLEMAN. Bus Operator. 

Kedzie. Emp. 3-1-65 
OPHELIA ELLIS. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 7-18-74 
TOBBIE GOWANS. Blksm. Wldr. Ldr. A. 

South Shops. Emp. 3-9-61 
LOUIS HALSELL. Bus Operator. 

Transp., Emp. 12-1-66 
ROBERT HENLEY. Bus Operator, 

Limits, Emp 6-2-70 
BOBBY JOHNSON, Laborer. 

West Shops. Emp. 11-14-69 
RICHARD LANETT. Bus Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp. 7-28-55 
GILES LIDDELL Jr., Bus Operator, 

Limits, Emp. 4-12-73 
EARNEST NEAL Jr., Bus Operator. 

North Avenue, Emp 3-4-71 
MOISES RAJCZYK, Bus Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 4-5-71 
ESTEBAN ROSARIO. Rail Janitor, 

Madison /Wabash, Emp. 4-21-72 
ROOSEVELT SMITH, Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 4-16-73 
DUANE THOMPSON. Bus Repairer. 

North Avenue. Emp 8-30-67 



IN IIVEEnVEOnR,!^ TVE 



HERMAN ANDERS, 78, Res & Plnng , 

Emp. 9-25-28. Died 8-25-84 
PAUL ANDERSON, 68, Limits. 
Emp 6-24-47. Died 7-16-84 
MOSES ASHLEY. 70. South Section. 

Emp 10-13-43. Died 7-23-84 
CYRIL BALDWIN. 80. South Shops, 

Emp. 2-5-47. Died 7-27-84 
TED BARGER. 72. Gen Finance. 

Emp 9-10-46. Died 6-3-84 
RALPH BRIGGS. 82. North Avenue. 

Emp 1-6-43. Died 7-10-84 
EDGAR BROWN. 77, North Avenue, 

Emp 10-10-28, Died 6-27-84 
JOSEPH BUTLER, 88, South Section 

Emp. 11-24-22. Died 8-8-84 
JAMES BYRNE. 84. Shops & Equip., 

Emp 3-29-28, Died 7-3-84 
MARY CASSELLS, 82. North Section. 

Emp. 6-23-41. Died 6-28-84 
JOSEPH COCHRANE. 75. Keeler. 

Emp. 3-24-43, Died 8-27-84 
ALONZO COQUILLETTE, 94. Devon. 

Emp. 6-18-09, Died 6-20-84 
RAYMOND DAGENAIS. 71, Transp . 

Emp. 8-15-41. Died 8-20-84 
CARL DANDY. 71, Archer. 

Emp. 8-17-36. Died 7-13-84 
ROBERT DAVIS. 70. 77th Street. 

Emp. 7-22-46. Died 8-7-84 
RAYMOND DOLL, 88, Lawndale, 

Emp. 1-28-24. Died 5-13-84 
NICHOLAS DOP. 86. Beverly. 

Emp. 2-27-19, Died 7-12-84 
EDWARD DUNN, 78, 77th Street, 

Emp. 10-26-33. Died 8-5-84 
JOHN EICHINGER, 80. West Section. 

Emp. 4-17-44. Died 8-28-84 
CHARLES EICHLER, 78. Forest Glen. 

Emp. 9-19-29. Died 8-30-84 
LEROY GRAHAM. 79, Limits. 

Emp 10-27 33. Died 6-20-84 
EDWARD GREEN. 61. 95th Street. 

Emp. 3-25-57. Died 6-3-84 
JOHN HARNETT, 84, Shops & Equip., 

Emp 3-22-27. Died 6-17-84 
ANGELOS HAROS, 84, Shops & Equip.. 

Emp. 11-26-28. Died 7-18-84 
RICHARD HARRIS. 78. West Section. 

Emp. 1-19-51. Died 8-18-84 
THOMAS HILDEBRANT. 72. District D, 

Emp. 3-13-34. Died 7-20-84 
ERNEST HOWARD. 79. West Section. 

Emp 9-29-26. Died 7-8-84 
ZDZISLAW HURMAN. 63, North Avenue, 

Emp. 1-11-67, Died 8-11-84 
AUGUST ILG. 81. Engineering, 

Emp 2-12-42. Died 6-21-84 
CHARLES ISAACSON. 81, Transportation. 

Emp 1-5-16. Died 7-22-84 
JOHN JARRELL. 81. Engineering. 

Emp. 7-29-26. Died 8-9-84 
EDWARD JENSKI. 62. Utility. 

Emp 7-18-47. Died 7-2-84 
JOSEPH JOHNSON. 69. Lawndale. 

Emp. 9-8-58, Died 7-24-84 
DONALD KANGAS. 77. North Section. 

Emp. 4-23-28. Died 5-19-84 
MATEUSAS KAUPAS. 96. West Shops. 

Emp. 2-27-17. Died 11-18-83 
HENRY KOSCHNITZKI. 79. 77th Street. 

Emp 10-22-29. Died 6-27-84 
HARRIET KRYZAN. 71. Compt /Acctg . 

Emp. 3-1-51, Died 6-22-84 
FRANCIS KSIAZEK, 80, North Avenue. 

Emp. 9-23-52. Died 7-23-84 



ALEXANDER LUCE. 78. Lawndale. 

Emp 2 13-36. Died 11-13 B3 
BERNARD LUDWIG. 69. North Section. 

Emp. 6-4 46. Died 8 2 t ■■! 
JAMES LYNAM. 74. Kedzie. 
Emp 2-18-42. Died 7-5-84 
FRANK MANHART. 86. Limits. 

Emp 6-9-26. Died 7-31-84 
JOHN McGAHEY, 79, West Shops. 

Emp 5-11 27, Died 6 9-84 
CARMEN MILFORD. 75. Security. 

Emp 1-9-43, Died 6-23-84 
JOHN MILLER, 54. Washington Garage. 

Emp 7-28-48, Died 8-14-84 
EDWARD NESTOR. 77. South Shops. 

Emp 7-12-46. Died 6-20-84 
GERALD NOLAN, 72. Claims/Law/Real Est . 

Emp. 5-18-56. Died 8-30-84 
WILLIAM NOLL. 92. Limits. 

Emp 3-26-13. Died 7-30-84 
PATRICK O'BYRNE, 85. North Park. 

Emp 8-21-42. Died 8-29-84 
JAMES O'CONNOR. 81. Kimball. 

Emp. 8-10-36. Died 5-24-84 
JOHN O'CONNOR. 81. 52nd Street. 

Emp. 2-22-27. Died 6-11-84 
LOUIS OLANDESE. 62. Adm Services. 

Emp 1-4-47. Died 8-7-84 
HAROLD O'MALLEY. 71. Adm Services. 

Emp 9-2-42. Died 8-4-84 
HARTWELL ONSTOTT. 62. North Avenue. 

Emp 12-5-60, Died 7-4-84 
MARION PERRIN, 84. Security. 
Emp 1-24-51. Died 7-13-84 
JAMES PHILBIN. 88. Central Distnct. 

Emp 12-16-19. Died 6-29-84 
LEO PLUSKOWSKI. 79. North Avenue. 

Emp. 6-17-29. Died 8-10-84 
NICK PORCARO, 90. Skokie. 
Emp. 4-16-43. Died 8-31-84 
ROBERT POWELL. 70. Archer. 
Emp 11-19-53. Died 6-20-84 
VIOLA RESTE. 78. Track. 

Emp. 6-26-39. Died 6-27-84 
THEODORE RHIND. 86. North Park. 

Emp 12-2-26. Died 8-25-84 
HERBERT SAFFRAHAN. 76. West Section. 

Emp 11-26-40. Died 6-25-84 
LAURA SCHRECKE. 84. Sched /Trail . 

Emp 6-1-30. Died 6-2-84 
OSCAR SEVON, 84. Keeler. 
Emp 2-5-29. Died 8-22-84 
DENNIS SHEEHAN. 80. Archer. 

Emp. 12-9-43. Died 6-27-84 
WILLIAM SHEEHY. 87. 77th Street. 

Emp 1-16-23. Died 6-17-84 
WILLIAM SPITZOCK. 77. Electrical. 

Emp 4-6-39. Died 6-12-84 
CHARLES SNYDER. 49, 69th Street. 

Emp 8-11-66. Died 7-4-84 
ARTHUR STERN. 73, North Section. 

Emp 11-14-45. Died 6 2-84 
LILBON STREETER. 64. Limits. 

Emp. 5-21-48. Died 8-22-84 
WALTER THOMAS. 67. Operations Plnng . 

Emp 9-10-35. Died 6-21-84 
JOHN TIFFY. 61. Central District. 

Emp 5-28-46. Died 6-6-84 
MICHAEL VERDONCK. 76. Accounting. 

Emp 4-10-41. Died 8-23-84 
SAMUEL VON HUBEN. 82. Shops & Equip . 

Emp 2-10-20. Died 7-10-84 
BOOKER WATSON. 76. Engineering. 

Emp 12 15-45. Died 6 22-84 
HARVEY WEBER. 88. Electrical. 
Emp 12-11-41. Died 7-28-84 
ARTHUR WEINREICH. 75. North Avenue. 

Emp 6-17-41. Died 6-15-84 
HERMAN WOODS. 61. West Shops. 
Emp 3-10-50. Died 7-27-84 



7984 Vol. 37- Nos. 9 & 10 



23 



589 EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 

(Forme'ly Employe* Cou«iiliig Prog. owl 

Purpose 
To find solutions for problems 

Goal 
Keep people working 



ALCOHOLISM 

DRUGS 

FINANCIAL 




LEGAL 
MARITAL 
EMOTIONAL 



eta Employees or family members 
or significant others 

CONFIDENTIAL /VOLUNTARY 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume37 Numbers 9 & 10 

Rjblished for employees and retirees of CTA. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 

Editor: Rick Willis 

Graphic Designer: Alexandra Eiva 

Contributing Writers: Robert A. Gaines, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, 
Illinois 60654. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT NO. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 




1984 Volume 37-Numbers 11 & 12 

Transit News 




hove 



those 



CUBS 




Utfto 



hfh* 1 



^ 



^ 



tX-C-^iSj^ 



1A 



hf-faft 



CCL-e 




CTA 








wn CTEA.J 



Wrigley Field sign promotes use of public transit 

tor ball fans. Bus Supervisor Thomas Christian 

stands beneath sign preparing for game to be 

completed. 




Chicago Cubs baseball fans expressed approval for 
their beloved "Cubbies" and the Chicago Transit 
Authority after the Cubs defeated the San Diego 
Padres on October 3 in Wrigley Field. 
Their team's 4-2 victory brought a full-throated roar from 
the 34,000 fans inside the nearly 60-year-old ball yard at 
Addison and Clark streets on Chicago's North Side. 

Then they streamed out of the ball park and poured onto 
the sidewalks like a breech in a dike. 

They weren't going to their cars in convenient multi-level 
parking facilities, because Wrigley Field is in a residential 
community and there are no large parking lots near the ball 
park. 

Still, less than 45 minutes after the game was over, most 
of the 34,000 fans were nowhere near Wrigley Field. Most 
were on their way home, or wherever. Thanks to CTA. 
Just a half bolck east of Wrigley Field is CTA's Addison 



elevated station, more than 20 years older than the ball 
park, and portal to the CTA's popular Howard-Englewood- 
Jackson Park "L"-subway route serving Chicago's lakefront. 
South Side, and suburban Evanston, Skokie, and Wilmette. 

What did the crowd think about CTA service at Wrigley 
Field? 

That question was asked in the fast-flowing mass of 
humanity moving toward the Addison station. 

"Terrific!" shouted a young blonde hanging on her 
boyfriend's arm. "The best," the boyfriend added. A junior 
executive, in his rumpled three-piece suit, laughed and 
shouted "Let's hear it for the good ole CTA!" A loud cheer 
went up as the throng entered the station, paid fares, swept 
upstairs, and boarded arriving trains. 

One of the best testimonials for the quality of the CTA's 
service came from a young man who expressed his silent 
approval with a thumbs-up gesture. 





CTA buses and rapid transit trains transport Cubs baseball fans from Wrigley field at Clark and Addison streets after the second playoff 
game between the Cubs and the San Diego Padres. About 18,000 persons boarded trains and buses in less than 30 minutes. 

2 CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Before the fans' roar of approval for the Cubs' victory 
sounded throughout the neighborhood called 
"Wrigleyville," the CTA had seven ticket agents in place and 
ready to serve the mass of riders with computer-like speed. 
Also at the ready upstairs were rail supervisors Jim Fahey on 
the northbound platform and William Jones on the south- 
bound platform. 

Agent supervisors Peter Rago and Ethel Armstrong 
assisted ticket agents Everett Mann, Lola Ducree, Charlotte 
Brent, Valeri McAuley, Raymond Rodriguez, Rene 
Melendez, and Bobby Reeves. 

Within 25 minutes after the game was over, more than 
14,000 persons had paid fares, gone upstairs, boarded 
trains, and left. 

On Addison just east of Clark, bus superintendents Her- 
man Miles and Walter Thomas scheduled supervisor 
Thomas Christian and six assistants to assure prompt service 
for the departing ball fans. 

CTA buses, in elephant-like single file and bumper to 
bumper, were quickly filled with riders entering front doors, 
with rear doors manned by fare collectors. Working for 
Christian were assistant supervisors Huey Danzie, Joseph 
Cook, Lee Otis Hall, L. J. Fletcher, John Grace, and Roy 
Ripka Jr. 

As the buses crept westward, they stuck bumper-to- 
bumper. 

"Any space large enough for a person to pass between 
the buses would permit those on the sidewalk to spill out on- 
to the street and block the forward movement of the buses," 
explained Michael LaVelle, manager of Transportation Ser- 
vice. 

In about 45 minutes nearly 4,000 persons were loaded 
onto Addison and Clark buses and were on their way. 

Was October 3rd an unusual day for CTA service at 
Wrigley Field because the Cubs and Padres were in a playoff 
game for the National League championship? 

"Not really," said LaVelle. "Every Cub home game this 
year since the All Star game in July has been a sellout or 
nearly one. It looks so easy because it all began with the first 
opening day at Wrigley back in the 1920's." 

Of the 34,000 fans at Wrigley Field on Oct. 3rd, 18,000 
or more than half, used the CTA. The rest used chartered 
buses, cabs, livery cars, or drove their cars and parked 
—somewhere. 



From the Chairman 



4'¥l&'^ 



_■ . .•- 






A banner year 

As 1984 draws to a close, my fellow Board 
members and I congratulate all CTA employees 
who have helped make 1984 another banner year 
for transit in Chicago. Through your efforts, this 
was a year of both facilities and personnel im- 
provement that will enable us to provide excellent 
transit service for years to come. 

In June we celebrated the opening of the new 
Kedzie Bus Garage. As the first of a new genera- 
tion of bus service and maintenance facilities, Ked- 
zie features state of the art maintenance efficiency 
and energy-saving indoor bus parking. In July con- 
struction was started on a similar bus garage at 
103rd Street and Stony Island Avenue. Installation 
of caissons and grade beams is now in progress, 
and we expect to open the new garage in the 
spring of 1987. 

We have made great strides in rapid transit facil- 
ity improvement including subway station modern- 
ization in the Downtown area, the opening of a 
completely remodelled Polk Street Station on the 
Douglas route, and, most significantly, the comple- 
tion of the O'Hare Extension. O'Hare ridership 
levels have been encouraging, and, during the 
holiday season, the O'Hare route proved to be a 
valuable convenience for northwest area residents, 
airport employees, and air travelers. 

Personal improvement and job commitment 
have also reached new levels. Through the efforts 
of the Employees Safety Performance Program 
and other training and incentive programs 
throughout the Authority we have established ex- 
cellent public safety and maintenance safety 
statistics. Voluntary improvement programs con- 
tinue to grow. In its fourth year, the Bus Roadeo 
fielded a record number of entrants, and 
maintenance employees joined operating 
employees in CTA's first Bus Maintenance 
Roadeo. The Third Rail Roundup provided a 
challenge for more rapid transit employees in its 
second year, and the new Ticket Agent TieUp was 
a success. Throughout all departments, increased 
participation in job knowledge and skill develop- 
ment programs has strengthened our most valuable 
resource — you, our employees. 

We appreciate the professionalism and dedica- 
tion demonstrated by CTA employees, and we 
urge you to greet 1985 with the same enthusiasm 
that has made CTA a leader in the transit industry 
and a valuable service for the people of Chicago. 



JLXt. 




1984 Vol. 37—Nos. 11 & 12 



Bernard Ford is 
APTA president, 
Mrs. Edwards gets 
COMTO region 




Bernard J. Ford 




Betty Edwards 

CTA Executive Director Bernard J. 
Ford was elected president of the 
American Public Transit Association's 
board of directors. 

APTA elected officers at its annual 
membership meeting held October 1 
in conjunction with the annual 
meeting and International Public 
Transit Expo '84. 

Ford has been an active member 
of the Technical Advisory Committee 



of the Illinois Transportation Study 
Commission, a member of the 
APTA Board of Directors, chairman 
of the Rail Safety Review Board, 
chairman of the Rail Transit Steering 
committee, a member of the APTA 
Membership committee, and the 
Awards committee. 

The CTA board appointed him as 
its Executive Director on June 2, 
1982 following a seven year hiatus 
which he spent with the Regional 
Transportation Authority, first as 
special assistant to the RTA chair- 
man, and director of Transportation, 
and finally as RTA General Manager. 
Previously, Ford worked for CTA 
from 1956 to 1975. 

His CTA career has included ser- 
vice as chief administrative officer, 
special assistant to the chairman, 
director of Personnel Administration, 
and various positions in research and 
personnel training. 

A native of Chicago, Bernard Ford 
studied at Loyola and Northwestern 
Universities, and the University of 
Notre Dame where he majored in in- 
dustrial psychology. 

In other elections, Mrs. Betty B. 
Edwards, CTA Community Affairs 
Manager, was named Region Four 
president, Conference of Minority 
Transit Officials, as COMTO con- 
vened its annual session in conjunc- 
tion with the annual APTA member- 
ship meeting. 

The region includes Illinois, In- 
diana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, 
North Dakota, and South Dakota. 
Harold Pollard, general manager of 
Waukegan Transit, was elected to 
the COMTO national board as a 
delegate-at-large. Waukegan Transit 
is a charter member of the COMTO 
Chicago chapter. 

The Conference of Minority Transit 
Officials has set Chicago as the site 
for the organization's national mid- 
year conference scheduled to con- 
vene April 25-27, Mrs. Edwards 
said. 



George J. Clark 
named to APTA 
Hall of Fame 




George J. Clark, a 39-year vet- 
eran of Chicago public transit service, 
was inducted into the Hall of Fame 
of the American Public Transit 
Association October 3 in a ceremony 
at Washington, D.C. 

Clark retired in 1974 as CTA's 
superintendent of Shops and Equip- 
ment, then equivalent to manager. 
Clark was honored by APTA for his 
many innovations in compiling 
specifications for bus and rapid transit 
cars and other accomplishments 
which improved buses and rapid 
transit cars. 

Now a resident of Simi Valley, 
California, Clark attended the 
ceremony in Washington, where 10 
transportation leaders were honored 
by APTA and members of the transit 
industry throughout North America. 

He began his career with the 
Chicago Surface Lines. In 1947 he 
began guiding the newly created 
Chicago Transit Authority's main- 
tenance department to become one 
of the premier organizations in the 
industry, and he pioneered many in- 
novations that have since become 
standards and techniques used 
throughout the transit industry. 

Clark joins another retired CTA of- 
ficial in APTA's Hall of Fame 
-Walter J. McCarter, CTA's first 
general manager, who was among 
the first inductees named to the Hall 
in 1983. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Hispanic Federation 
names Elda Leal 
"Woman of Year' 



»> 




Elda Leal, superintendent, CTA Community Relations, named the 1984 "Woman of the 
Year" by this Hispanic Federation of Illinois Chambers of Commerce, demonstrates her 
goodwill at-large ambassadorship as she distributes fliers promoting public transporta- 
tion. The Chambers of Commerce honored the veteran CTA employee in recognition of 
her personal achievements and community contributions. 



Elda Leal, superintendent of com- 
munity relations in the recently 
created Community Affairs Depart- 
ment, has been named Woman of 
the Year by the Hispanic Federation 
of Illinios Chambers of Commerce. 

The award was presented at the 
chamber's Third annual Installation 
and Awards Dinner on November 20 
at the McCormick Center Hotel. The 
Woman of the Year Award is pre- 
sented annually to an individual who 
has excelled in the business com- 
munity and has contributed towards 
the advancement of the Hispanic 
community in Illinois. 

Mrs. Leal's personal achievements 
and community contributions earned 
her the 1984 title of Woman of the 
Year by a unanimous vote of the 
Hispanic Federation Of Illinois 
Chambers of Commerce. 

A CTA employee since 1973, Mrs. 
Leal started her career as a 



secretary/customer assistance 
representative. In 1975 she was pro- 
moted to community news 
representative to serve as liaison to 
the Spanish language news media. In 
1981 she was named media coor- 
dinator. 

Mrs. Leal is a graduate of the 
English Commercial Institute of 
Monterrey, Mexico, and has studied 
at Northwestern University. She is 
president of El Hogar del Nino social 
service agency, which serves the 
Latin -American community, and a 
board member of the General Woods 
Chicago Boys Club. 

She is also a member of the 
Mexican-American Business and Pro- 
fessional Women of Chicago, the 
Hispanic Alliance for Career 
Enhancement, and the executive 
committee of the Conference of 
Minority Transportation Officials. 
Chicago Metropolitan Area Chapter 
(COMTO). 



Former personnel 
manager Fran 
Knautz dies 




Francis C. (Fran) Knautz, 70, 
retired CTA personnel manager, died 
Friday, November 9, in St. Anne 
Hospital after a short illness. 

Mr. Knautz had a 35-year career 
in public transit before his retirement 
in 1977. He is survived by his wife, 
Rose Anne, three sons, and his 
mother. 

He joined the Chicago Surface 
Lines in 1942 at Lawndale Garage 
as a clerk. As his career developed 
he was superintendent of job 
classification, superintendent of 
employee relations, and assistant 
secretary of the Chicago Transit 
Board. 

He was appointed director, Public 
Information on October 1, 1964, and 
subsequently was named personnel 
manager. 

Mr. Knautz attended Austin High 
School and Northwestern University. 
He was an active mason, and 
shriner, and since his retirement from 
CTA, he had been active in real 
estate sales. 



1984 Vol. 37—Nos. 11 & 12 



\Commendation Cornet 




Denise Bragg (West Sec- 
tion) was the conductor of 
an O'Hare-Douglas train 
that Steve Takaki boarded 
at O'Hare terminal en route 
to his home on Diversey 
Avenue, "The newly 
opened O'Hare terminal sta- 
tion was a delightful 
pleasure indeed. I would 
like to commend the con- 
ductor of the train for the 
professional manner in 
which she conducted her 
duties She made the 
passengers aware of the 
points of interest, welcom- 
ing people aboard the new 
service, as well as announ- 
cing all the station stops, 
transfer points and pro- 
hibiting laws. A person of 
such high competence 
must be praised and 
shown the proper gratitude 
deserved. " 



John Lawson (Archer garage) was the operator of a No. 
129 North Western/Franklin bus that Louie Parrott 
boarded near his office on West Jackson Boulevard. 
"Something was wrong with our bus - a red light would 
begin to glow, and the driver would have to race the 
engine for a few seconds. This happened four times 
before we reached our destination, and each time the 
passengers would react with complaints, moans, etc. The 
driver said nothing, just revved the engine and got us on 
our way. I told him 1 thought he was extremely 
courteous, considering the level of abuse he was taking, 
and he just smiled and thanked me." 

Clovee Mattox (North Avenue garage) is admired by 
Rosemarie Stewart, of Marmora Avenue, for his "ex- 
traordinary efforts to serve the public" as operator of a 
No. 65 Grand bus. "He will help handicapped persons 
on and off his bus. I saw him help one elderly woman last 
winter with two heavy shopping bags. He helped her 
down from the bus, carried her bags down, and put them 
carefully into a doorway out of the weather so she could 
rest a bit. I've also seen him ask young people to give up 
their front seats to handicapped persons. He is courteous 
to drivers and passengers, and is always aware of what is 
going on in his bus." 

Charles Young (West Section) was commended by 
Colette McNulty, of River Forest, for his courtesy as con- 
ductor of a Congress-O'Hare train. "He makes every ef- 
fort to inform passengers, and to make them aware of ex- 
tra information that could mean the difference between 
being lost and knowing exactly where you are going. At 
each stop, he announces the name of the station and its 
numerical location, the train designation, and the final 
destination. At downtown stops he also gives points of in- 
terest and important businesses surrounding the station. 
It is this kind of service that gives Chicago the image of a 
friendly town." 



William Knudsen (Forest 
Glen garage) was com- 
plimented for his courtesy 
as operator of a No. 78 
Montrose bus by Lolita 
Mancini, of North Mulligan 
Avenue. "This gentleman 
will wait that extra minute 
for a passenger who is run- 
ning for the bus. His 
cheery 'Good morning' or 'I 
missed you yesterday' 
makes one feel that riding 
his bus is a privilege, 
rather than a chore. Senior 
citizens are greeted with 
respect, and many com- 
ments are made among his 
passengers that he makes 
them feel recognized. This 
super driver even gives 
students such respect that 
they have their money, 
passes and a smile ready 
when they board." 



Helen Woods (77th Street garage) was called "a 
wonderful person" by Edwina Smith, of Marine Drive, 
who was a rider on her No. 4 Cottage Grove bus. "I no- 
ticed her from 69th Street all the way to the Loop. She 
was so considerate of so many people. She saw a couple 
with several small children running for the bus and waited 
for them, greeting them with a wonderful smile and a 
happy hello. In fact, she greeted everyone with a smile 
and was very nice. I must add that she is a very good 
driver, very careful and mindful of the other drivers on 
the street. What a great combination! What a pleasure to 
meet such a wonderful bus driver!" 

Alvin Bond (North Avenue garage) is "one in a million," 
according to Bee Samuel, of North Troy Street, who was 
a rider on his No. 77 Belmont bus. "I boarded his bus in 
front of St. Joseph Hospital. I told him I had tendonitis of 
the right knee, and he would have to be patient with my 
slowness. He said, 'Take your time.' His attire was clean, 
he was courteous, and he drove carefully and cautiously 
trying to avoid the worst potholes on Belmont Avenue. 
He also called out the street names loud and clear, and 
cheerfully answered passengers' questions about their 
destinations. Why can't we have more drivers like him?" 

LeRoy Can (Forest Glen garage - retired) is missed by 
riders on an early morning No. 85A North Central bus, 
according to Robert Hogan, who rode it regularly en 
route to his office on South LaSalle Street. "I know that I 
speak for many of my fellow No. 85A riders in praising 
the traits of courtesy, patience, and understanding, which 
were the trademark of LeRoy Carr. In addition to these 
qualities, he never failed to maintain a timely schedule. 
We were all reminded of this last December, when he 
was on vacation. For about two weeks, the replacement 
drivers either failed to show up or were late." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



\Commendation Corner \ 




Robert Surita (77th Street 
garage) was appreciated 
for his courtesy by Tanya 
Brumfield, of Drexel 
Avenue, who was a rider 
on his No. 79 79th Street 
bus. "I feel he gives excep- 
tional service to the public. 
He is extremely courteous, 
and greets you with a 
smile each day. He calls all 
of the stops, and reminds 
you to be careful when 
boarding or leaving the 
bus. He is usually always 
on schedule, and will wait 
if you are approaching or 
running for the bus. This 
driver is someone special. I 
would hope that his 
positive attitude and ex- 
ceptional service will be 
acknowledged. It's a 
pleasure to ride his bus 
each day." 



Ruth Neal (77th Street garage) was noticed by Velo 
Wright Sr., of South Shore Drive, for her consideration 
as operator of a No. 27 South Deering bus. "She extend- 
ed a pleasant smile to each passenger who entered the 
bus, and wished exiting passengers a nice evening. South 
of 63rd Street, I saw an elderly lady hurrying to reach the 
next stop. The operator guided the bus along the curb, 
and stopped well before the bus stop. Calling to the lady, 
she told her to stop running and come aboard. With a 
smile she said, 'I don't want you to run like that.' It was 
comforting to be transported by someone who really 
cares." 

Leon Davis (North Park garage) is considered "one of 
your finer employees" by Sylvia Moore, of Pine Grove 
Avenue, who was a rider on his No. 147 Outer Drive Ex- 
press bus. "He was most courteous. I noticed that he 
greeted every passenger who boarded the bus with a 
smile. He took precaution not to jerk the bus while pulling 
off, so as not to make any of the passengers lose their 
footing. He was very helpful to those who needed ques- 
tions answered. And he showed authentic interest in 
helping to solve their problems. To sum things up, I could 
have slept all the way home because of the smoothness 
of the ride." 

Hattie Sandrella (North Section) was praised for her 
performance as conductor of an Evanston Express train 
by David Yablong, of North LaSalle Street. "She and the 
motorman both got the two-car elevated train started 
after it stalled at the street intersection just south of the 
Linden Avenue station. It was she who directed the 
motorman, and suggested how to get the train started. 
She took the controls while the motorman used 'the 
stingers' to get current from the electrified rail past the in- 
tersection. She explained to the passengers that 
everything was all right with the train, but that it had 
stalled." 



Rudolph Blakemore (North 
Avenue garage) was ap- 
plauded by Christina 
O'Shogay, who rode his 
No. 66 Chicago bus to her 
job on East Chicago 
Avenue. "He was the most 
courteous, pleasant, caring 
individual I have ridden 
with on this route in 12 
years. He deserves recogni- 
tion for the superior man- 
ner in which he handles his 
bus and passengers. He 
calls out every stop, says 
'Good morning' to each 
passenger, thanks you lor 
your transfer, tells 
everyone to 'Hold on,' and 
instructs boarding 
passengers to move to the 
rear to make room tor 
others. He is very polite 
and conscientious, and ob- 
viously does his job to the 
best of his ability." 

Cedrick Johnson (Kedzie garage) was saluted by 
Geraldine Szpekowski, of Diversey Avenue, for his con- 
scientiousness at the Devon-Kedzie terminal. "Along with 
other passengers, I waited a few minutes to board the 
(No. 82 Kimball/Homan) bus, upon the request of the 
operator. He picked up a broom and shovel to clean out 
his bus, which was dirty with pop cans, juice containers, 
newspapers, lunch wrappers, etc. When asked why he 
was cleaning up, he said, 'You pay for service, not dirty 
buses.' 1 was impressed, too. because he didn't just 
sweep it out the door, but picked up and discarded the 
rubbish, leaving the terminal clean." 

Searcy Barnett (North Park garage) won the approval 
of Hannah Kraus, of Lunt Avenue, for the way he 
operated his No. 151 Sheridan bus. "He should be com- 
mended for his many kindnesses and attention to the 
riders. I have encountered him before, and have noted 
his patience and kind explanation of routes, transfers, 
etc. Yesterday, as the bus was pulling to a stop, he no- 
ticed a young blind girl trying to step down to cross the 
street. He called to her, explaining that she should move 
to the right, as her cane touched a pole. Noting that she 
seemed uncertain, he alighted from the bus and helped 
her across the street." 

Thomas Davis (Washington garage) was the subject of 
a letter from Mary O'Malley, of North Sawyer Avenue. "I 
would not be able to come to work if it weren't for the 
(Special Services) bus which picks me up each morning 
and takes me home in the evening. Mr. Davis has been 
our driver for almost two years now. He is one of the 
finest human beings I have ever met. Not only is he a fine 
driver, but he also takes very good care of his passengers, 
helps us board the bus in all kinds of weather, assists us 
with our packages, and is generally cheerful and helpful. 
He is an excellent representative of your fine organiza- 
tion." 



1984 Vol. 37—Nos. 11 & 12 



Seven operating 
employees honored 
with Day in CTA 

Seven employees of the Operations 
Division have been accorded honors 
through "A Day in CTA" for outstand- 
ing service above and beyond normal 
duties. 

Motorman Cordell Bruns, a 
member of the 1983 Roundhouse 18, 
and his conductor, Arthur Loman, 
were credited with averting a tragedy 
and possibly saving the life of a 
passenger who fell between the third 
and fourth cars of the crew's north- 
bound West-South train at 95th 
Street. 

Bruns, responding to Loman's 
signal, brought his train to an im- 
mediate stop after traveling only a 
short distance. The passenger had 
been running along the platform when 
he attempted to jump aboard the mov- 
ing train. As he fell the conductor 
signaled the motorman to stop and 
pulled the emergency cord. 

Other employees recognized for 
acts of heroism were conductors Joe 
Jones, Douglas Terminal, and Richard 
Corbett, Kimball Terminal. Jones was 
working the Congress O'Hare route 
from Desplaines when a woman came 
into his car complaining that teenagers 
had attempted to rob her. Jones 
notified his motorman to stop the train 
and the CTA Control Center and 
police were immediately alerted. The 
conductor's genuine interest and con- 
cern prompted a commendation from 
the passenger as well as CTA recogni- 
tion. 

Operations personnel said Conduc- 
tor Corbett observed a fight between 
three people at Wells and Madison on 
the Ravenswood route, and had the 
train stopped. Upon investigating, 
Corbett found that one person had 
been robbed of his wallet by two other 
men who fled down the platform. One 
of the offenders ran from the platform 
onto the tracks, and Corbett gave 
chase when the power was turned off. 

In a similar incident, bus operator 
Lester Lockhart, 77th Street Garage, 
subdued and restrained a man who 
was attacking a woman at 130th and 
Indiana Avenue. Lockhart held the 
man until help arrived. 




"Day in CTA" honorees received a briefing from bus controller Lealie Hinton as they 
toured the Control Center. They are (from left) motorman Cordell Bruns, rail conductors 
Joe Jones and Arthur Loman, and bus operator Lester Lockhart. 




Special recognition for outstanding performance and service beyond their normal 
responsibilities was accorded these operating employees on "A Day in CTA." They are 
(from left) rail conductor Richard Corbett, bus operator Jeanette Martin, and bus super- 
visor Willie McCain. 



Compassion for an unattended 
child observed by operator Jeanette 
Martin of Archer Garage prompted the 
recognition of this employee. Ms. Mar- 
tin was working the 79th Street route 
near Stony Island Avenue at approx- 
imately 9 pm when she saw the small 
boy. She took the child aboard her 
bus, the police were notified, and the 
child was reunited with his mother. 

Meanwhile, the activities of a 
27-year-old would-be busnapper were 
halted, thanks to the alert response of 
District A supervisor Willie McCain. 
McCain observed a bus standing at 



100th and Commercial shortly after 
midnight with improper destination 
signs. He reported the matter to the 
Control Center and was advised that 
the vehicle had been stolen from 69th 
Street Garage. Police were notified, 
and the man aboard the bus, who 
claimed to be a CTA repairman, was 
taken into custody. 

These employees were honored by 
the Operations Division for displaying 
thorough job knowledge and a high 
degree of professionalism in situations 
that, in most cases, involved personal 
risk. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



New Rail Cars 



Louis Grabowski (left), acting 
foreman, discusses inspection of the 
first car of the second lot of 300 new 
2600 series rail cars with Tom 
Poindexter, Budd Car Company 
representative, and George Haenisch 
(right) superintendent, Rail Vehicle 
Shops. The cars were delivered to 
Skokie Shops where they were being 
prepared for integration into the CTA 
system. The complete shipment of 
600 cars is the largest single rail car 
order in CTA's history. 




Thanks for a job well done 

Employees who have received commendations from the public. 



Robert Abbinanti, Forest Glen 
Charles Alexander, 77th Street 
Rosa Alfaro, Forest Glen 
Syed Alimuddin, West Section 
Earl Allen, District C 
Lavan Anderson, Kedzie 
Leftherry Andoniadis, North 

Park 
Francisco Aragon, North Park 
Rogelio Arrazola, North Park 
Drake Atkins, Central Counting 
Katie Avery, North Avenue 

Lerline Ball, 77th Street 
Darryl Barber, North Avenue 
Bobby Barnes, 69th Street 
Searcy Barnett, North Park 
Edward Barry, North Avenue 
Arnold Beler, North Park 
Samuel Bellmon, Limits 
Albert Borner Jr., 77th Street 
Bruce Bradley, 77th Street 
Elton Branch, 77th Street 
Charles Briscoe, North Avenue 
Junior Broadbent, Forest Glen 
Bill Brown, Limits 
Claudia Brown, Limits 
Joe Bullock, Limits 
Janet Burton, North Park 
Allen Butler, North Park 
James Butler, North Park 

Robert Cadiz, North Park 
Jean Cage, North Park 
Leroy Can, Forest Glen 
Delois Carter, Forest Glen 
Ethel Claiborne, 77th Street 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
Jerry Conner, North Park 
Javier Cortez, Jefferson Park 
Arnold Crater, 77th Street 
James Cruthird, Bus Instruction 
Earl Cunningham, Kedzie 
Michal Czyzynski, North Park 

Hayse Daugherty, Archer 
George Davenport, 77th Street 
Vincent Dawson, Forest Glen 
Johnny Dickerson, North 
Avenue 
7984 Vol. 37—Nos. 11 & 12 



Wilbert Dohrmann, Forest Glen 
Harper Donahue Jr., 77th Street 
Richard Dorsch, North Avenue 
Frank Drewrey, Special Services 
Daniel Dzyacky, North Park 

Edward Elam, 69th Street 
John Elmore, North Park 

Atsia Fair, 77th Street 
Jesus Fernandez, North Park 
Angela Floyd, 77th Street 

Eleanor Garro, Law 
David Gaston, North Park 
Kris Gielnlewski, 77th Street 
Jeffrey Gilbert, Howard/Kimball 
Wallacene Good, Forest Glen 
Rose Goody, Archer 
Mitchell Gray, Howard/Kimball 
Ronald Gray Sr., Beverly 
Lorenzo Gunn Jr., Forest Glen 

Harold Hamler, Limits 
James Hampton, Howard/Kimball 
Niki Hansen, Forest Glen 
Hyman Harrison, Forest Glen 
William Head, Forest Glen 
Leonard Heady, Beverly 
Venita Higglns, 77th Street 
Isaac Holden, 77th Street 
Samuel Howard, West Section 
Roger Hudson, 77th Street 

Rosa Irlzarry, Forest Glen 

Harry Jackson, North Park 
Davis Jackson, Limits 
Bennie Jackson Jr., Forest Glen 
James Jeffries, Limits 
Manuel Johnson, Beverly 
Donnie Johnson, 77th Street 
Curtis Johnson, 77th Street 
Gilbert Johnson, 77th Street 
Bryan Jones, 69th Street 
Howard Jones, Archer 
Isaac Jones, Archer 
Pierre Jose, Support Services 

Robert Kantor, Forest Glen 
Joseph Kelso, 69th Street 



Joe Kent, 77th Street 
Harvey Kirkpatrick, Bus 

Instruction 
John Kloska, Jefferson Park 
Kenneth Koral, Elec Veh 

Design 
Robert Kremer, North Park 
Kenneth Kusek, North Park 

Lee Lampley. 77th Street 
Pauline Lankin. 77th Street 
Marco Lara, Forest Glen 
Charles Lindsay, Kedzie 
Leonard Lloyd, North Park 
Shirley Louis, North Avenue 

Nelson Machado, Forest Glen 
Albert Mangram, North Avenue 
William Markowski, Forest Glen 
Jesse Marshall Jr., North Park 
Angel Martinez, North Park 
Ernest McCormick, North Park 
James McDonald, Kedzie 
Mable Mitchell, South Section 
Angel Mojlca, North Park 
Humberto Monroy, North Park 
Jack Moore, North Park 
Eugene Motyka, Jefferson Park 
Ubaldo Munoz, North Park 
Chaka Myles, 77th Street 

Stanley Nolan, North Avenue 
Mark Nootens, Forest Glen 

Frederick Owens, 77th Street 

Alicia Parham, North Section 
Edna Parker, North Section 
Siddharth Patel. North Park 
Frederick Pepke, Limits 
Burgess Peterson, Forest Glen 
Alvin Polowczyk, Forest Glen 
Rlcardo Puerto, Douglas/ 
Congress 

James Quinn, North Park 

Robert Reed, Special Services 

Eugene Reid, Limits 

Robert Richardson. North Park 



Eugenio Rivera, North Avenue 
Rafael Rivera, North Park 
Guy Roadruck, Limits 
Pearlle Robinson, 77th Street 
Alvin Ross Jr., 77th Street 
Edward Ross Jr., Kedzie 

Roy Sampson, North Avenue 
Erther Scott Jr., Limits 
Ronald Singleton, Beverly 
Ruth Smith, Special Services 
Betty Spivey. 69th Street 
William Stafford. Special 

Services 
Rosie Starks, Forest Glen 
Dwayne Stlnson, Limits 
Vincent Stofer, Archer 
Howard Stratton. Howard/ 

Kimball 
Marion Stubbs, North Park 
Vytautas Stukells, Archer 
Mitchell Szalwa, Forest Glen 

Tyler Tankson, North Section 
Robert Tlrado. North Park 
Orlando Torres, North Avenue 
Herman Trimuel, North Park 
David Tucker, North Avenue 
Lawrence Tuggle, 77th Street 
Elbert Turner, West Section 

Sandra Venton, 69th Street 

Ronnie Walker, Beverly 
Willie Walker. North Park 
Billy Walker. Forest Glen 
Hazel Walker, Limits 
Thomas Walker, Limits 
Barbara Ware, 77th Street 
Leon Washington, 77th Street 
O. D. Watson. 69th Street 
Conrad Well, Forest Glen 
Laurence Whitney, Limits 
Peter Wlllemsen, North Park 
Wayne Williams, Bus Instruction 

Jacques Yezegulelian, North 

Avenue 
Thelma Young, Forest Glen 



CTA basketball tea 



General Office Outlaws 1 983-84 Basketball 

tournament champions show off individual 

and team trophies. The trophy display 

followed a banquet at the Americana Hotel 

honoring tournament participants. Members 

of the team are |from left): Coach Arliss 

Jones, Marvin Kelsey (statistician), Phillip 

Ross, Coach Arthur Hubbard, Reggie 

Williams, Carl King, Joe Jackson, Sam Miller 

and John Harvey. 



Blue Thunder Coach Will Williams (left) was 
named Coach of the Year. Comprised of per- 
sonnel from various CTA locations. Blue 
Thunder proved to be a tough National 
League challenger in spite of entering the 
league late in the season. Coach Williams' 
team finished in third place. Making the 
presentation is Amalgamated Transit Union 
Local 241 President Elcosie Gresham. 













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10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 






honored at banquet 




Limits Lakers Coach Alexander Miller accepts 
the second place trophy from ATU Local 241 
President Gresham. Although runners-up to 
the General Office Outlaws, the Lakers were 
1983-84 National League Division champions 



General Office Outlaws guard John Harvey 
(left) shows off his prize, the championship 
game's Most Valuable Player |MVP| trophy as 
Gresham looks on approvingly. 



Limits Lakers guard Anthony Coleman |right) 
was honored with a trophy, presented by 
ATU President Gresham for having earned 
the most points in the championship playoff 





1984 Vol. 37—Nos. 11 & 12 



11 




CTA General Attorney Hughes 
heads list of CTA honorees 




CTA General Attorney Joyce A. 
Hughes was named winner of the 
1984 Outstanding Achievement 
Award in the Professions sponsored 
by the YWCA of Metropolitan 
Chicago. Presentation was made Oc- 
tober 3 at the YWCA's annual Leader 
Luncheon. 

Ms. Hughes is the first female and 
black General Attorney ever ap- 
pointed by CTA. She is responsible for 
all CTA legal activities which include 
advising and serving as legal counsel 
for the CTA Board. She heads a 
department of more than 150 at- 
torneys, workers compensation, 
claims, real estate, and labor relations 
personnel. 

Attorney Hughes' name was sub- 
mitted in nomination to the YWCA 
Leader Luncheon Awards Committee 
by the Conference of Minority 
Transportation Officials, Chicago 
Metropolitan Area Chapter. 

The recommendation, signed by 
COMTO President Betty B. Edwards, 
noted, "Through the years. Attorney 
Hughes has demonstrated excellence 
and leadership in the field of law and is 
an exemplary model for young 
women throughout Metropolitan 
Chicago and the entire nation as a 
professor of law, as a member of the 
Chicago School Board, and as a 



volunteer with numerous social service 
agencies and organizations. 

"Attorney Hughes has worked un- 
tiringly in order that young people will 
benefit from the fruits of her labor and 
become successful adults and leaders 
of tomorrow..." 

Ten other CTA women recom- 
mended by CTA Chairman Michael 
A. Cardilli, also received recognition 
from the Leadership Luncheon 
Awards Committee. They were: Mar- 
jorie Holmes Banks, manager, Affir- 
mative Action; Betty B. Edwards, 
manager, Community Relations; 
Anita Curtis, manager, Personnel Ad- 
ministration; Florence Salus, director, 
Engineering and Maintenance Person- 
nel Service; and Virginia Wendorf, 
director, Financial Reporting and 
Analysis. 

Others receiving recognition were: 
Lorene Murray, superintendent, 
General Law; Loretta Eadie-Daniels, 
superintendent, Tort Litigation, and 
attorneys Loretta Cooney, Andre 
Bryant, and Kathleen Herrmann. 
Each of the 10 recipients received a 
certificate for "outstanding contribu- 
tion to the CTA," and honoring "the 
leadership of women in the economic, 
cultural, and civic life of the Chicago 
metropolitan community." 

Ms. Hughes has been a practicing 
attorney with various private and 
public law offices since 1967. She is 
currently a professor of law at Nor- 
thwestern University, and has served 
on the Board of Directors of Leader- 
ship Greater Chicago since 1982. She 
also serves as vice president of 
the Chicago Community Renewal 
Society. 

A Fulbright Scholar, Ms. Hughes is 
a director of the Federal Home Loan 
Bank of Chicago, a trustee of Carleton 
College and past President of the 
Chicago Forum. 

She is the former senior attorney for 
the Continental Illinois National Bank, 
and has served on the Chicago Board 
of Education, the Governor's Council 
on Jobs and Economy, and the Illinois 
Supreme Court Committee on Rules 
of Evidence. She served six years as a 
member of the Board of Directors of 
the National Urban League, and was a 
trustee of the National Girl Scouts. 




■ Marjorie Holmes Banks, Manager, Af- 
firmative Action, since September 
1981, joined CTA's Insurance Department 
May 26, 1970, and was appointed to the 
Human Relations Department in 1974. A 
frequent business, social and religious 
organization lecturer on stress manage- 
ment, Mrs. Banks is also an instructor in 
the Roosevelt University Business Col- 
lege's Evening and Weekend division. 
Credentials include a BS degree in per- 
sonnel administration and an MBA from 
Roosevelt. She is listed in Who's Who in 
the Midwest and has been honored with 
other laurels from the YWCA and other 
community, business and religious 
organizations. 




■ Betty B. Edwards, Manager, Com- 
munity Affairs, since May, 1984, 
joined CTA's Public Affairs Department 
on June 10, 1974 as a community relations 
representative. She is currently president 
of the Chicago chapter, Conference of 
Minority Transit Officials (COMTO), and 
holds membership with COMTO's na- 
tional nominating board, the Chicago Ur- 
ban League's Women's Board, the Neal- 
Marshall Alumni Club of Indiana Universi- 
ty, Chicago Association of Media Women 
and National Association of Media 
Women. She is treasurer of the Chicago 
Urban Affairs Council, and her credentials 
include a BS degree in education from In- 
diana University. 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




■ Anita L. Curtis, Manager, Personnel 
Administration since 1982, began her 
CTA career on March 13, 1957 as a clerk- 
typist and has served in a number of posi- 
tions including employment clerk, inter- 
viewer, and supervisor. In 1979 she was 
named director of Employment and Place- 
ment. 




■ Florence Salus, Director, Engineering 
and Maintenance Personnel 
Service, joined CTA on March 27, 1977 as 
a clerk in the Maintenance Department 
and was later named executive secretary 
to the General Operations Manager, 
Harold Geissenheimer. Subsequently she 
returned to the Maintenance department 
where she was promoted to supervisor, 
Personnel and Training, followed by 
superintendent, Personnel. Mrs. Salus 
holds a BA degree in business administra- 
tion from Wilkes Barre College in Wilkes 
Barre, Pa. 




■ Virginia Wendorf, Director, Financial 
Reporting and Analysis, since joining 
CTA on March 5, 1979, is a Certified Public 
Accountant. She holds a BA degree in ac- 
counting from Roosevelt University, 
where she graduated with department 
honors. 




■ Lorene Murray, Superintendent, 
General Law, since March 11, 1984, 
joined CTA as a staff attorney on January 
31, 1979. She earned distinction during 
1982-83 by conducting workshops for 
CTA's Employee Assistance Program in 
connection with the Association of Labor 
Management Administrators for Con- 
sultants on Alcoholism. She was a 
speaker before the Legal Affairs Commit- 
tee of APTA at the 1983 annual meeting. 
Credentials include a BA degree in 
government from Loyola University and a 
JD degree from Northern Illinois 
University. 




■ Loretta Eadie-Daniels, Superinten- 
dent, Tort Litigation since Septem- 
ber, 1979, joined CTA July 5, 1977 as a 
staff attorney. She is a former trust officer 
with the American National Bank and 
Trust Company of Chicago and was a 
member of the Cook County Public 
Defender's Office. Credentials include a 
BA degree from Loyola University, and a 
JD degree from DePaul University Law 
School. 




■ Loretta Cooney, a staff attorney 
since August 15, 1979, was formerly 
assigned to the Tort Litigation section. 
Mrs. Cooney also handled labor and 
general law cases. Prior to joining CTA, 



she prosecuted environmental law cases 
for the Illinois Attorney General's office. 
She is an alumnus of the University of Il- 
linois where she earned a BA degree In 
political science, history, and education. 
She holds a J D degree from Loyola Univer- 
sity. In 1978, Mrs. Cooney was nominated 
for Outstanding Woman of the Year. Her 
husband, Robert Cooney, is an attorney In 
private practice. They are the parents of 
an 18-month old son Patrick. 




■ O. Andre Bryant, a staff attorney 
since October 29, 1979, set a record 
in 1983 as Cook County's top female trial 
attorney. She is an alumnus of Tennesse 
State College where she earned a BS 
degree in social work education, and she 
received a JD degree from DePaul Univer- 
sity. Her son, Kondo Dale, is a student at 
Howard University majoring in com- 
munications. 




■ Kathleen Herrmann, Staff Attorney 
since November 25, 1983, served as 
a paralegal in CTA's Law department and 
a transportation planner in Operations 
Planning from 1981 to 1983. She was In- 
volved In such projects as the Southwest 
Side Transit proposal and the Elderly and 
Handicapped program. Ms. Herrmann's 
credentials include a BA degree In 
sociology, cum-laude, 1978, Northern Il- 
linois University; Master of Urban Plan- 
ning, University of Illinois at Champaign- 
Urbana, and a JD degree with honors, 
Chicago Kent College of Law. She is a 
member of the Chicago Bar Association 
Urban Affairs Committee. 



7984 Vol. 37—Nos. 11 & 12 



13 



Thanksgiving luncheon is annual treat at 69th St. 




This committee of 69th Street Garage employees paused to say thanks to co-workers and to celebrate with a traditional Thanksgiving 
Day least. The annual event is in its ninth year, and has had the cooperation of all of the personnel and management at 69th Street. 
Members of the committee are (seated) Zola Harrington (left), chairperson, and Gladys Norvell. Standing (from left) are Dorothy Brookins, 
Georgia Washington, Vernell Roberts, Georgia Miles, Eddie Mae Jones, Muriel Womack, Mellowniece Springfield, John Walls, Dorothy 
Harris, Yvonne Piondexter, Carol Reed, Harry Green, Ellie M. Head, Rancetta Nails, Henrimae Lloyd, and Viola Hester Watkins. Not 
shown are Rosetta Jones, co-chairperson, and Linda Green. 

A Thanksgiving luncheon at 69th 
Street Garage, that started nine years 
ago simply as coffee and cake, has 
developed into an annual affair and 
scrumptious meal, rivaling the best 
and tempting any palate. 

Proof positive of the gourmet's 
delight at the 69th Street Garage 
Thanksgiving feast was evident, as a 
steady flow of people moved through 
the food line. They stopped in be- 
tween runs, on their day off, or on 
their vacation to enjoy the tasty 
delights of home cooking. 

The menu included everything from 
turkey, ham, dressing, greens and 
assorted side dishes to banana pud- 
ding, pies, assorted cakes and other 
desserts. There was no reason for 
anyone to leave hungry or wanting for 
any item on the traditionally seasonal 
bill of fare, because it was all there. 

The luncheon had its beginning in 
1975 when the first female bus 
operators were assigned to 69th Street 
Garage. Now it is held each year, 
usually the week before the 

Thanksgiving holiday. 

Two 69th Street bus operators are ready to enjoy a Thanksgiving feast served by Ms. "jj was our wav , f sayjnq thank vou 

Henrimae Lloyd, a member of the Thanksgiving program committee at the southside , ... , 

n ara g e to the men of this garage tor the way 




U 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Show stoppers Georgia Miles, and Marvin 
Young take the stage as a duo of fashion 
in white. 

they welcomed us when we started 
here," said Zola Harrington who has 
been the luncheon chairperson for six 
of the nine years that it has been held. 
"We are now like one big family," Ms. 
Harrington said. 

An added attraction this year was a 
fashion show. The debonair and 
fashionable ladies and gentlemen of 
69th Street strolled across the stage 
and onto the floor proving that not on- 
ly can they cook, but they also know 
how to look, whether on the job or on 
the town. 

Among the special guests invited to 
the Thanksgiving feast and fashion 
show was Isaac Beal, director, Special 
Services, Elderly and Handicapped. 
Beal was superintendent at 69th Street 
Garage in 1975 when the special 
Thanksgiving treat began. He was 
joined by Deputy Executive Director, 
Operations, Harry Reddrick and 
members of his staff. Representing 
CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 
was his special assistant, John 
Weatherspoon. 



Moore installs COMTO officer for new year 




Kimberly Tyler, daughter of 69th Street 
bus operator Sandra Johnson, steps 
smartly wearing a hip rap chemise with 
dolman sleeves, and an Oriental flair. 




The Reverend Jerry A. Moore, Jr. (right), national president, Conference of Minority 
Transportation Officials, congratulates Ernest Sawyer, vice president, and Mrs. Betty B. 
Edwards, president, Chicago Metropolitan Area chapter of COMTO, on being elected for a 
new term. 



The Chicago chapter of the Con- 
ference of Minority Transportation Of- 
ficials (COMTO) convened at McCor- 
mick Inn November 13 to hear the in- 
spirational remarks of its national 
president, the Rev. Jerry A. Moore, 
Jr. 

Moore urged CTA/RTA members 
of COMTO to continue lifting the ban- 
ner of entrepreneur spirit and equal 
access. The pastor of Washington, 
D.C's 19th Avenue Baptist Church 
was in Chicago at the invitation of 
local COMTO officers for the purpose 
of installing the 1985-86 board. 

Reelected to the board were Betty 
B. Edwards, president; Ernest 
Sawyer, vice president; and Charles 
E. Marble, treasurer. Marjorie Banks, 
and Ana M. Del Rivero were elected 
as secretaries. 

Retained as executive committee 
members were Celso Castellanos, 
Anita Curtis, Elonzo Hill, Paul 
Kadowaki, Ruth LeBron, Milton 
Lamb, Elda Leal, William Mansker, 
Harold Pollard, Harry Reddrick, Doris 
Thompson, and Richard Willis. New 
executive committee members are 
Joyce Hughes, John Finch, Delia 
Richards, and Michael LaFargue. 
Frederick G. King was named ex- 
ecutive committee member, emeritus. 

Before installing the officers and 
board the Reverend Moore told the 
audience of some 100 people, "A $40 



COMTO membership would be a 
worthwhile personal investment." 
Mrs. Edwards, manager, CTA Com- 
munity Affairs, has pledged to in- 
crease the Chicago COMTO chapter 
to 150 members for 1985. 

Other participants on the installation 
program were Danny Lawson, president, 
Lawson National Distributing Company, 
and COMTO national vice president, 
who cited recent accomplishments made 
by COMTO. Fred G. King, deputy ex- 
ecutive director, CTA Human 
Resources, gave an organization over- 
view. Serving as master of ceremonies 
was Charles E. Marble. 

Visitors on the occasion were Cook 
County Commissioners Charles 
Bowen and Samuel Vaughan, a 
retired CTA claims representative; 
Kathleen K. Parker, member of the 
RTA board; State Representative 
Howard Brookins; Sam Patch, Con- 
sult, Ltd.; Jenny Laster, COMTO 
director-at-large; Velma Wilson, direc- 
tor, Tourism, Mayors Office of Special 
Events, 17th Ward Alderman Allan 
Streeter; and Dr. Richard Passwell, 
director. School of Transportation, 
University of Illinios at Chicago. 

COMTO was founded in January 
1971 at Howard University in 
Washington. Its purpose is to promote 
better conditions and circumstances 
for all minorities associated with public 
transportation. 



1984 Vol. 37—Nos. 11 & 12 



15 



Four south area garages show low accident rate 




Tom Reilly (right), south area bus superintendent, is justifiably proud of the public safety 
improvements accomplished by his team of garage superintendents (from left) Joseph 
Steinbach, 69th Street; David Hinman, 77th Street; Burnett Henderson, Beverly, and L J. 
Hampton, Archer. 



Tom Reilly, South area bus 
superintendent, likes low numbers, as 
in low accident rate numbers. 

The numbers Reilly had been look- 
ing at regarding the accident rates for 
the garages in his jurisdiction were, to 
say the least, unimpressive. They were 
not the low numbers he likes. 

Archer, Beverly, 69th Street and 
77th Street garages have a total of 



1,088 buses and 2,272 bus operators. 
Reilly's south area is the largest of 
CTA's two bus areas. 

"Last spring I got together with my 
garage superintendents, L. J. Hamp- 
ton of Archer, Burnett Henderson of 
Beverly, Joseph Steinbach of 69th, 
and David Hinman of 77th and I 
challenged them to lower their acci- 
dent rates," Reilly said. "I put it on the 



table and dared them to do it - accept 
the challenge. I didn't ask for words, I 
asked for lower numbers." 

When the Public Safety Contest 
results for the third quarter of 1984 
were announced, Reilly got his low 
numbers. Of the nine garages in the 
quarterly competition, 77th Street, 
69th Street, Archer, and Beverly 
finished 1-2-3-4 in that order. 

The smiling Reilly praised his 
superintendents for their success. 

H^ praised the assistant 
superintendents — Robert Julun, 
Isaac Clark, Horace Brooks, Walter 
Alexander, and Robert Newman, all 
of 77th garage; Walter Caston and 
Ronald Mitchell of 69th garage; Lloyd 
St. James, Edward Panek, and 
George Weathers of Archer garage; 
and John Grayer of Beverly garage. 

Also lauded were area relief 
superintendents Timothy Hall, William 
Jaycox, William Nash, Arthur Lee, 
and William Claiborne. 

"I'm very proud of these 
employees, but they could not have 
met the challenge without the dedica- 
tion of their bus operators," said Reil- 
ly. "Without the operators' coopera- 
tion, my challenge would still be on 
the table." 



■ CTA engineer is creative art photographer 

Some of the most unusual, yet most 
creative photography to be exhibited 
in recent months is the work of CTA 
structural engineer Ray Radic, an avid 
and talented art photographer. 

A native of Yugoslavia, Radic holds 
a BS degree in structural engineering 
which he earned in Belgrade. He 
studied art photography in Paris where 
his work has also been exhibited. 

Recently, Radic's art was displayed 
in the lobby of the Merchandise Mart 
National Bank where it drew more 
than a little attention from bank 
customers, employees, and the artist's 
CTA co-workers in the Merchandise 
Mart. 

The unusual effects and composi- 
tion of Radic's artistic creativeness and 
architectural photography are striking 
to the observer, whether a casual ac- 
quaintance or connoisseur of art 
photography, and they demand atten- 
tion. 

His work is produced with a 4x5 




Engineer/artist Radic soars the air with a gesture to emphasize a point about technique 
as he explains the work in his creative art photography exhibit. 



camera and the subjects are superim- 
posed several times on the same 
transparency. In some instances, sub- 
jects are superimposed on two or three 
transparencies sandwiching the subject 
to achieve a variety color balance in 



the printing process. 

Radic's artistic prints, which make 
handsome wall plaques as well as 
great subjects of conversation, range 
in size from 16x20 to 30x40. 



16 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Homework hotline needs more tutors 




Homework Hotline volunteers recruited by the Chicago Education Corps answer phone 
calls from inquiring students at the hotline office in the Sun-Times Building. Volunteers 
work one day a week from 5 till 8 p.m. 



Earns degree 



Homework is a necessary part of 
everyone's educational experience, 
but it can also lead to frustration for 
students trying to answer problems 
they must confront outside the school 
environment. 

That is why the Chicago Education 
Corps (CEC) set up a Homework 
Hotline two years ago to help students 
find answers over the telephone to 
problems that come up while they're 
working at home. 

CEC Director Dr. Frances Holliday 
said the two-year-old program urgent- 
ly needs more volunteers to answer 
phones. "We would like to expand our 
efforts, but we can't until we have 
enough people," she said. 

Dr. Holliday said middle-grade 
students from private and parochial as 
well as public schools are encouraged 
to use the hotline, which is advertised 
on posters in both city and suburban 
schools. About 25 percent of the calls 
actually come from the suburbs. 

CEC is looking for individuals who 
are willing to spend three hours one 
day a week answering telephone ap- 
peals for help at the Homework 
Hotline office in Room 523 of the 
Sun-Times Building, 401 N. Wabash 
Ave. The Hotline operates Monday 
through Thursday from 5 till 8 p.m. It 



is not open on holidays. 

An academic background is impor- 
tant for anyone entering the program, 
and a thorough knowledge of math is 
also necessary, since more than half of 
the questions asked relate to math. 
Other subjects often asked about in- 
clude social studies, science and 
language arts. In regard to the latter, 
good spelling and proper grammar are 
also needed to provide effective 
guidance. 

"There are plenty of CTA people 
who are qualified for this type of ser- 
vice," said Betty Edwards, manager of 
Community Affairs. "One of the 
greatest satisfactions you can have is 
knowing you're helping children learn, 
and the positive results can last well 
beyond your lifetime." 

Edwards said employees from all 
areas of CTA are urged to participate 
in the program. She noted that 
General Office personnel would find 
the CEC volunteer schedule especially 
convenient because of the way it fits in 
with their working hours at the Mer- 
chandise Mart, which is just a few 
blocks away from the Sun-Times 
Building. 

For information on how you can 
become a Homework Hotline 
volunteer, call 890-8435. 




Joseph Blake. Jr., a motorman 
assigned to O'Hare Terminal, received 
a bachelor of science degree in 
business administration from 
Roosevelt University in September. 
He is enrolled in the university's Labor 
Leadership program. Blake who also 
holds an associate degree in material 
management from the Community 
College of the Air Force, joined CTA 
in 1970. He is a union steward for 
ATU 308. 



Mother and daughter 




Mrs. Cassie MilleT (top), and her 
daughter, Sybil, were the proud reci- 
pients of associate degrees from Loop 
Junior College recently. They are the 
mother and sister of CTA Claims 
Department clerk Krystal Miller Mrs 
Miller earned an associate of science 
degree in child development and plans 
to continue her education in that 
discipline at Roosevelt University this 
fall. Sybil received an associate liberal 
arts degree, and will attend Chicago 
State University to study business 
administration. 



7984 Vol. 37—Nos. 11 & 12 



17 



Electrical Workers 



Ted works in the Design and Con- 
struction Section of the Facilities 
Engineering and Maintenance Divi- 
sion. For all you duffers, Gregory's 
design plan for winning golf is simple: 
Hit the ball hard, hit the ball straight, 
but not too often. 




CTA members of Local 9, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, 
proudly desplay their float entered in the 1984 Labor Day parade along Michigan 
Avenue. Sections represented were Signal, Third Rail, Cable Communications 
and Turnstyle. 

Aboard the flatbed are Ron Oclon (left) and Robert Brown, Signal section. 



Millikin Honors 
program 




Michael Benshish, son of Safety 
Specialist Ronald Benshish of Equip- 
ment Engineering and Maintenance, 
has been selected for the James 
Millikin Scholarship honors program at 
Millikin University in Decatur, IL 
where he is a freshman. Benshish, a 
graduate of Driscoll Catholic High 
School, was selected for the four-year 
program on the basis of academic 
achievement, national test scores, per- 
sonal interviews, and recommenda- 
tions by the Driscoll High School facul- 
ty. At Driscoll, Benshish was active in 
a variety of musical activities, he was a 
member of the National Honor Socie- 
ty, and he was active in drama and the 
liturgy group. 



AFS student 




Jesse Burns, Jr., the son of instructor 
Jesse Burns, Sr., CTA Operations 
Training Center, recently returned 
from a two-month stay in Rethel, 
France as an exchange student in the 
American Foreign Student program. 
The 16-year old Burns is a senior at 
Whitney Young High School where 
he is catcher for the Whitney Dolphins 
baseball team. His ambition is to play 
professional baseball. 



Architect hits hole-in-one 

Architect Ted Gregory "designed" a 
hole-in-one golf shot on the 12th fair- 
way of the Glencoe Golf Club on Oct- 
ober 10. He was playing in a foursome 
when he shot his masterpiece, a 
133-yard 8-iron shot. It wasn't his first, 
either, because Gregory scored his first 
hole-in-one in 1964 at the Lake Forest 
Golf Club. 



Pianist Paul Van Lysebettens, son of 
bus operator Bob Van Lysebettens, 
Forest Glen Garage, debuts Feb. 2, 
1985 with the Southwest Symphony 
Orchestra winter concert. He has 
given solo performances at the Con- 
rad Hilton, the Chicago Yacht Club, 
the Chicago Temple, and St. Peter's 
church, as well as several recitals in 
Chicago's Loop, and various chamber 
ensemble groups. Van Lysebettens 
holds a B. A. degree in piano from the 
American Conservatory where he is 
continuing his piano study. 



Cheerleading honors 




UWA 



Pamela Palmore. 14, the daughter 
of CTA Property Accounting Cost 
Analyst Vernon Palmore, finished 
eighth of 3,000 girls participating in 
the 1984 Lansing, Mich. National 
Cheerleaders Association competition 
August 22-26. 

She is a Corliss High School 
freshman, and captain of the Chicago 
Park District's Abbott Scots 
Cheerleaders team, which placed sec- 
ond in over all competition and won a 
loving cup. 

Miss Palmore received a plaque and 
two individual medals for her perfor- 
mance. She has been a member of the 
Abbott Scots since 1982. 



18 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Service anniversaries 
in November 

45 Years 

Frank Ross Jr., Mechanical Maint. 

35 Years 

Joseph Nasti, Elec. Distribution 
Emll Rusinak, Computer Operations 

30 Years 

Eton Chaney, 77th Street 
Ray Helm, Beverly 

25 Years 

Ray Carter, Limits 

George Ehardt, Forest Glen 

Edward Gorz, Forest Glen 

Edward Havlicek, Support Services 
"Hugh Hegarty, Local 308 

Thurman Jackson, Ashland Terminal 

Joseph Jaros, Vehicle Wiring 

Rudolph Johnson, Beverly 

Willie Moore, Beverly 

Edward Mulvihill. Douglas/Congress 

Jodie Rand Jr., Ashland Terminal 

William Reese. District C 

Ronald Volland, General Maint 

Willie White. Comm. /Power Control 

Cleveland White Jr., Harlem 

Lawrence Wilson, District B 

Edward Wisniewski, Rosemont 
'Retroactive to 6-84 



Service anniversaries 
in December 

30 Years 

John Butler, Washington 

25 Years 

Isaac Barho, Const Inspection 
Namon Brown, District C 
John Hoff Jr., Bus Instruction 
Clifton Lewis, North Avenue 
Joseph Maciuszek, 77th Street 
William McCoy, North Avenue 
Bennie Rogers, 69th Street 
Bruno Rome), Comm. /Power Control 
Donald Wilson, Central District 



November Pensioners 

TONY CRUMPLER. Rail Janitor, 

Madison/Wabash, Emp. 11-7-57 
THADDEUS GUTT, Car Servicer, 

98th Street. Emp 9-13-67 
MARTIN HENNESSY. Machinist. 

Skokie Shop. Emp. 10-30-50 
1SMAEL LOPEZ, Bus Servicer, 

Limits, Emp. 9-23-70 
MORRIS MADISON, Stationery Engineer 

West Shops. Emp 10-5-76 
JACK SCURTE. Bus Operator 

North Avenue, Emp. 7-3-51 
LYNDON THENHAUS, Carpenter. 

Skokie Shop, Emp 4-15-74 



MAX TSUCHIDA. Bus Servicer. 

North Park. Emp 10-20-48 
LULLING WILLIAMS. Janitor, 

Madison /Wabash, Emp. 6-25-69 

Disability Retirements 

JOSEPH DORNSEIFER. Bus Operator, 

Limits, Emp. 12-5-60 
"MAXCEL NOBLES, Bus Operator. 

69th Street, Emp 7-10-69 
THEOD1S WELLS, Motorman. 

95th Street, Emp 10-22-56 

'Retroactive to 8- 1-84 



December Pensioners 

HYMAN HARRISON. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen, Emp 2-13-75 
BENNY HERRON, Bus Operator, 

Kedzie, Emp. 5-3-51 
TADDEUSZ ROPA. Term Comb. Clerk, 

Skokie Shop. Emp. 6-25-64 
OTIS THOMAS, Rail Janitor, 

Madison/Wabash, Emp. 8-29-57 
WILLIAM WHITENHILL, Asst. Supt., 

Forest Glen. Emp. 12-5-52 
FREDERICK WISE. Painter, 

West Shops. Emp. 11-28-77 

Disability Retirements 

WILLIAM HOOPER, Bus Operator. 

Kedzie, Emp. 2-15-51 
ROBERT MILLS, Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen, Emp. 6-28-71 



IIsT MEMORIAM 



CARL ASCHENBRENNER. 74, Engineering, 

Emp. 10-21-42, Died 11-3-84 
FLOYD BASSETT, 79, 77th Street. 

Emp. 7-26-27. Died 11-17-84 
ALBERT BINSTOCK. 77. South Shops. 

Emp 11-7-38, Died 8-7-84 
SILVESTER BONADONNA, 83, Engineering. 

Emp. 5-19-27, Died 11-19-84 
JOHN CAROLAN, 63, Jefferson Park. 

Emp 11-27-41, Died 11-8-84 
ROBERT CHAMBERS. 49, Transportation, 

Emp. 8-25-55. Died 11-10-84 
EDWARD CHAPLESKI. 68, District D, 

Emp. 10-3-42. Died 11-18-84 
PATRICK CLARKE, 85, Transportation. 

Emp. 11-24-26, Died 8-8-84 
EDWARD COLEMAN. 85. Transportation. 

Emp. 10-28-47. Died 9-15-84 
KATHLEEN CONNELLY, 91, South Section. 

Emp. 8-11-43, Died 9-23-84 
MELBOURNE DASHER. 71, Kedzie. 

Emp 1-25-46. Died 9-19-84 
JOHN DAV1TT, 67, North Avenue. 

Emp 7-29-41. Died 9-3-84 
CORNELIUS DeBOER. 77, Transportation. 

Emp 4-9-41. Died 9-15-84 
FRANK DeNOTTO. 74. North Avenue, 

Emp 1-9-30, Died 11-7-84 
SAM DOVICH, 94. Way & Structs.. 

Emp. 6-3-36, Died 11-7-84 
GEORGE EDWARDS. 71, Forest Glen. 

Emp 10-18-35. Died 9-23-84 



WILLIAM FLYNN, 71, District A. 

Emp. 8-18 41. Died 9- 19-84 
AUGUST FORMANEK, 71. Archer. 

Emp. 5-13-41. Died 9- 13-84 
ELMER FORMELLER, 73. Forest Glen, 

Emp. 9 8-36, Died 9-30-84 
HENRY GERALI. 59, Forest Glen, 

Emp 6-26-46, Died 9-9-84 
HENRY GOTTSCH. 77. Beverly. 

Emp. 2-18-36. Died 9-20-84 
RALPH GRADY. 81. Archer. 
Emp 5 8-44, Died 9- 16-84 
DANIEL HANRAHAN. 71. South Shops, 

Emp 8 4 36. Died 9-21-84 
MARTIN HENNESSY. 61. Skokie Shop. 

Emp. 10-30-50. Died 11-5-84 
EDNA HEYNE. 91, South Section, 

Emp. 9-5-30. Died 9-4-84 
CHARLES HILL. 85. West Section. 

Emp 5-9-27. Died 9-24-84 
FRAN KNAUTZ. 70, Personnel, 

Emp. 8-7-42, Died 11-9-84 
EDWIN LAGERSTROM. 76. Beverly. 

Emp. 3-27-34, Died 11-19-84 
HENRY LIND. 89, Cottage Grove, 

Emp. 9-22-27. Died 5-3-84 
JOHN LOCACIUS. 73. Kedzie. 
Emp 5-26-34, Died 9-26-84 
NORMAN LODERHOSE, 78. West Section. 

Emp 2-23-26. Died 9-2-84 
EDWARD MARTIN, 80. West Section. 

Emp 11-2-43 Died 11-12-84 
ONOFRIO MARTORANA. 87. Const. & Maint . 

Emp 5-19-36, Died 11 14-84 
JOHN MASCARI, 78. Shops & Equip., 

Emp 11-9-42, Died 11 19-84 
HENRY MILNE. 81. South Shops. 

Emp. 4-3-47. Died 9-13-84 
PETER MOLFESE, 71, Lawndale. 

Emp. 6-30-43. Died 11-11-84 
WILLIAM MOOG. 76, Transportation. 

Emp 4-12-34. Died 9-16-84 
WILLIAM MOUNT. 65. South Section. 

Emp. 3-8-47. Died 11-13-84 
JOHN NISSON. 89. Devon. 

Emp. 10-22-29. Died 10-24-84 
MICHAEL O'MALLEY. 87. North Section. 

Emp. 2-26-23. Died 9-25-84 
WILLIAM ROONEY. 65. Kimball. 

Emp. 12-22-43. Died 11-84 
TRULS RUSING. 80. Transportation. 

Emp 4-1-26. Died 9-4-84 
ALFRED SCARPELLI, 82. North Park. 

Emp. 8-13-43. Died 9-26 84 
CHARLES SCHMIDT. 75. North Avenue. 

Emp. 3-28-34. Died 9-27-84 
CHARLES SCHOEWER. 70. North Park. 

Emp 11 25-36. Died 10-17-84 
LEO TARGOSZ. 64. 54th/Douglas. 

Emp 12-20-40, Died 11-1-84 
FRANK TAVANO. 69, Plant Maint . 

Emp. 9-6-49. Died 11 12-84 
ROBERT THOMPSON. 71. Forest Glen. 

Emp 6-26-58. Died 9-15-84 
PAULINE TORREY. 71. Datacenter. 

Emp 4 18-56. Died 11 4-84 
MILAN UKROPINA. 90. Way & Structs.. 

Emp 3-10 23, Died 9-9-84 
CLARKE WHITE. 82. Archer. 

Emp 9-20- 47, Died 11-11-84 
WILLIAM WILLIAMS. 82, Accounting. 

Emp 12 16 33. Died 9-1-84 
THEODORE WOSS, 74. South Shops. 
Emp 8-1 29. Died 1119-84 



1984 Vol. 37—Nos. 11 & 12 



19 




m 



m 



m 



AS REPORTED BY EMPLOYEES OF THE CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 



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like that just never happen. Impossible, you say? Well, hold on to your 
hats, ladies and gents! Because . . . Transit News IS bringing back the 
good old days! With . . . 

THE INSIDE NEWS. 

CTA's illustrious pack of Roving Reporters will be out there to get 
YOUR news while it's still hot! 

We'll need your help, of course! All that's required is a "nose for 
news" at your work location. Special events, vacations, births, wed- 
dings, good things happening at your garage or office— that's what 
THE INSIDE NEWS is all about. It's the part of Transit News that's all 
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Interested in being a voluntary INSIDE NEWS Reporter for your 
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help Transit News bring back the good old days through 
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CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume37 Numbers 11 &12 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 

Editor: Rick Willis 

Graphic Designer: Alexandra Elva 

Contributing Writers: Robert A. Gaines, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others, $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS. Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, 
Illinois 60654. 



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FuBT. 



7985 Volume 38 - Number 1 

Transit News 




jwould much rather have saved the kids' lives than 
get an award." 

That sums up the feelings of Bennie Wardlow, an iron 
worker helper, who was honored with a citizen's award by 
Mayor Harold Washington for his efforts to rescue two 
children from a burning building on Kenmore and Irving 
Park Road. 

The tragic fire took the lives of five children and their 
mother, who apparently were trapped in their third floor 
apartment one Sunday morning shortly before Christmas. 
A neighbor alerted Wardlow that the family had not got- 
ten out of the building. 

Wardlow had been on the street nearby, assisting iron 
workers who were on a scaffold over Irving Park Road, 
renewing flange angles on the elevated structure just west 
of Kenmore. As the first fire companies rushed to the 
scene, he saw smoke and ran to the building to see if he 
could help. 

"It was a confusing situation," he said. "The building 
had one of those courtyards and a number of entrances. 
The fire seemed to be mainly on the first floor. 

"But then someone yelled that there were kids up on 
the third floor, so I ran up some stairs and tried to open 
the apartment door. It wouldn't budge till I put all my 



weight against it and kicked it in. 

"There was a lot of smoke, and I saw this little hand. I 
grabbed it and pulled a child toward me till I had a chance 
to pass it to someone behind me. Then I went back and 
saw another little one. 

"I got that one out, too, but they both already felt limp. 
I just wish I could have gotten there earlier." 

Wardlow, a bachelor, felt a deep sense of loss over the 
deaths of the children. Of the rescue effort, he said, "I'd 
do it all over again if I could bring them out alive." 

Mayor Washington praised Wardlow and dozens of 
firemen from units that had responded to the fire. The 
ceremony took place in the fire station at 3801 N. Damen 
Ave., headquarters for the 5th Battalion, on the first 
working day after the tragedy for those who had been on 
duty. 

Fire Commissioner Louis Galante began the ceremony 
by reading a report describing the fire scene and the steps 
that were taken to rescue residents and put out the fire. 
He then joined the mayor in passing through the ranks of 
those assembled for a personal word with each. 

All agreed they would have felt much better about the 
honor if there had been a happier ending to the rescue ef- 
fort. 



Learning modern 
handling techniques 




The seventh class to complete the eight-week Material Handling 
and Warehousing course sponsored by CTA Materials Manage- 
ment, show off their certificates as instructor Eugene Magad (left) 
looks on. Members of the class are (from left, front to rear) Annie 
Burgett, Allen Moyzis, and Richard Rusiniak, Frederick Barrett, 
William Wozniak, Constance Brabec, Ronald Donnelly, Alvin 
Sprangle, Matthew Rago, Diane Gainer, Lori Muhling, Josephine 
Maslic, Felix Black, Michete Hawkins, Billie Mitchell, Willie 
Turner, Angelique Jones, Clarence Works, Leroy Williamson, 
Willie Henning, and Edward Tobin, manager/Materials Manage- 
ment purchasing agent. Completing the course, but not shown 
were Diana Blaino, Ruth Ann Miles, and Valerie Dillon. 

The modernization of CTA warehouses by Materials 
Management has prompted an on-going advance training 
program in material handling for more than 100 Materials 
Management employees. 

A 32-hour course in material handling concepts was 
developed by Materials Management personnel and Eugene 
Magad and Associates. The course was designed to 
familiarize personnel with new material handling and 
warehousing techniques. 

Bill Roman, director of Stores, Materials Management, 
said that personnel who have completed the training pro- 
gram are now more knowledgeable in their areas of 
endeavor. This increased exposure benefits both the in- 
dividual and CTA. 

Training includes a study of the different advantages and 
disadvantages of using various manual, semi-automated, 
and automated storage and retrieval systems. It also ex- 
amines a variety of material handling equipment and 
evaluates the use of each type of equipment for warehous- 
ing layouts, racking, and specific types of materials. 

Material handling systems used in other parts of the world 
are explained and analyzed during the course. Warehouse 
safety, layout, inventory control, and cost factors are also 
discussed. 

Class participants are given an opportunity to measure 
their personal growth through examination. Certificates are 
awarded for course completion. 

The course is taught by Eugene Magad, coordinator of 
the Materials Management Program in the Business Division 
at William Rainey Harper College in northwest suburban 
Palatine. 

Magad has served as a consultant in warehousing, 
materials management, and industrial engineering in 
Europe and Japan, and throughout the United States. He 
has conducted training classes for CTA Materials Manage- 
ment personnel since 1981. 



From the Chairman 



Quality of life 

Many historians agree that the advancement 
and quality of life of a civilization can be 
measured by the care and compassion provided 
by each civilization for its aged, chronically-ill, 
poverty stricken, or otherwise unfortunate 
citizens. It therefore follows that the quality of an 
agency and its employees can be measured by 
the employees' willingness to respond to the 
needs of less fortunate members of our commun- 
ity through charitable contributions and acts of 
kindness. 

As Transit Division Chairman, I thank you, in 
behalf of United Cerebral Palsy of Greater 
Chicago, for your generous contributions, three 
times last year's total, which enabled the United 
Cerebral Palsy Telethon to get off to a good start 
and exceed its 1985 goal. Your contributions will 
provide continuing research, treatment and future 
prevention of this crippling injury to the brain. 

Yet the telethon is just one example of your 
on-going concern for others. Your support of the 
United Way Crusade of Mercy through payroll 
deduction contributions throughout the year, your 
generous donations of blood during CTA's blood 
drive for the benefit of United Blood Services and 
the American Red Cross, and your donations of 
food products to the Chicago Sharing It Food-a- 
thon will be greatly appreciated by the people 
who benefit from the work of these organizations. 

Most importantly, your concern for others is 
also demonstrated through your actions. We 
receive numerous commendations from riders 
every month, especially senior citizens and dis- 
abled riders, complimenting employees who 
make a special effort to help all riders receive 
outstanding service for their CTA fares. Several 
employees have also been publicly honored for 
community service work and other generous and 
heroic efforts to help others. 

I believe that we all can share a sense of ac- 
complishment and pride in the generosity and 
kindness consistently shown by CTA employees 
which demonstrate the character of CTA 
employees and improve the quality of life in the 
City of Chicago. 



JLXC; 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



B 



anquet honors winners 
of maintenance roadeo 



II ••■■■■■■■•■■■I •■•IIIIIIKII Itllll I ■ Illllll ■ ,,,, 



Winners in CTA's first Maintenance 
Roadeo received the accolades of 
management, family members, friend 
and co-workers at a special awards 
banquet October 26 at the Holiday 
Inn/Mart Plaza ballroom. 

Respective awards, including gift 
certificates for a weekend getaway for 
two, trophies and other assorted 
prizes, were presented to individual 
team members for their ac- 
complishments. 

Taking the coveted prize of a 
weekend for two in Itasca's Nordic 
Hills Country Club were Forest Glen 
Garage's first place team members, 
assistant foreman William Rafferty, 
combination clerk Frank Marshall, and 
bus repairer Darwin Zaremba. 

Second and third place honors went 
to the 77th Street Garage. The second 





Proudly displaying their second place awards earned in the Maintenance Roadeo are 
(from left) team captain Reuben Johnson, combination clerk, and bus repairers Salvador 
Contreras, and Nguyen Dai. Richard Schneider (right), manager, Eguipment Engineering 
and Maintenance, made the presentations. 



place team included Nguyen Dai and 
Salvador Contreras, bus repairers, 
and Reuben Johnson, combination 
clerk. The two-man third place team 
was bus repairers John Murphy and 
Philip Murnane. Each member of the 
top three teams received an individual 
trophy, dinner, theater and gift cer- 
tificates, a special belt buckle and a 



First place winners in theCTA Maintenance Roadeo share their proud moment with Depu- 
ty Executive Director, Engineering and Maintenance, George Millonas (right). Showing off 
their prizes are (from left) combination clerk Frank Marshall, bus repairer Darwin Zarem- 
ba, and assistant foreman William Rafferty, team captain. 



Roadeo participants received caps, 
pens, cups and patches. 

Awards were presented by Ex- 
ecutive Director Bernard J. Ford and 
Deputy Executive Director. Engineer- 
ing and Maintenance. George 
Millonas. Afterward they con- 
gratulated roadeo participants for their 
determination and success in the 
event. 

Engineering Maintenance Safety 
supervisor Jim Dudley, master of 
ceremonies, expressed appreciation 
for the great participation of all the 
contestants and volunteer roadeo 
workers. 

"We believe this roadeo will have 
more participation each year. This first 
roadeo effort demonstrates the 
positive thinking and the excellent 
teamwork which we had in putting the 
event on." said Dudley. "I'm sure a 
national maintenance roadeo would 
be a fine idea. I think it would be ex- 
cellent competition," Dudley com- 
mented. 

Project chairman for the 1984 
Maintenance Roadeo was William 
Wong, unit supervisor. Bus Garages, 
who is assigned to Washington 
Garage. 



special shoulder patch. 

The two Maintenance Roadeo 
runner-up teams included bus 
repairers Willie Rachel. William Mc- 
Cray, and Theodore Yancy, and 
Michael Kasman and Ken Hanna. 

Each member of the top five teams 
received individual plaques and 
jackets, while all of the Maintenance 



■•■■■■•■•■■■■■■■•■■■•■■•■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■••■••■■••■■■••■■••■■■■■■••••■■••••■■■■■■■■■■■•■■■•••••■■■> • ■ ■ 



1985 Vol. 38— No. 1 



Commendation Corner 



Marvin Chachere (North Park 
garage) was called "an excep- 
tional driver" by Victor 
Kulikauskas, of North 
Maplewood Avenue, who was 
a rider on his No. 50 Damen 
bus. "In addition to being very 
courteous and friendly with 
boarding and exiting 
passengers, he also cares 
about students going to 
elementary as well as high 
schools. He will ask them 
about their school work, tell 
them how to improve, and 
give them advice about their 
problems. Even students who 
are loud on other buses sit 
quietly in his bus. He also ex- 
plains to young people very 
nicely how they must pay 
their fares, and directs them 
to their destinations." 



Robert Martinez (North Park garage) was complimented 
by Pat DeBonnett, of South LaSalle Street, for the way he 
handled his No. 11 Lincoln bus. "He left me with a lasting 
impression of the quality of service he provided each 
passenger, and his driving was excellent. Although the 
weather was bad, he made me feel good to be on public 
transportation. The pride he held in his work helped me 
better understand why a member of my family had such 
pride in his former driving profession. If more drivers 
would show more pride in their profession, the public 
would reciprocate." 

Johnny Wisdom (North Section) "is always a pleasure to 
travel with," according to Adrian Jones, who takes an 
Evanston Express train to his job on South Michigan 
Avenue. "This conductor is unfailingly cheerful, attentive 
to his job, and looking out to help passengers. His efforts 
to assist a near-blind lady on the train made me take 
special notice of him. The lady was on her way to a 
hospital downtown, but was not familiar with the train 
stops, and had to be reassured a number of times that she 
would be helped at the right stop. Conductor No. 21532 
did a wonderful job keeping her calm and satisfied." 

Melvin Dukes (North Avenue garage) is held "in highest 
esteem" by Eleanor Cash, of Argyle Street, for the way he 
handled his No. 53 Pulaski bus. "As we boarded that 
evening at 31st Street, he informed both men and women 
to hold on to their purses and wallets. We were calmly but 
honestly told there had been a number of incidents in the 
area north of 16th Street. Around Roosevelt Road, a large 
group of what I call 'thugs' came aboard the bus, and he 
told them, 'No trouble, no pushing, no shoving on the 
bus.' This driver really was concerned and caring for the 
safety and well-being of his passengers." 




Albert Croarkin (77th Street 
garage) was the operator of 
an early morning No. 29 State 
bus ridden regularly by C. 0. 
Jones, of Lafayette Avenue. "I 
leave my residence well 
before 5 a.m. Dependable 
public transportation at that 
hour is vital. Driver No. 5842 
has been at the wheel of the 
bus that I board Tuesday 
through Friday. The bus ar- 
rives at 95th Street just in 
time for my train. This driver 
is always on time, courteous 
and cheerful. Meeting him the 
first hour of my day has cer- 
tainly improved my disposi- 
tion. I only wish he could re- 
main permanently on his cur- 
rent schedule. It's a pleasant 
way to begin my day." 



Georgia Harris (North Park garage) was praised by Marie 
Moore, of North Lake Shore Drive, for her concern for 
passengers on a No. 145 Wilson/Michigan bus. "I was 
coming home from the Chicago Symphony concert one 
evening when four young men boarded the bus at 
Washington, and started to smoke marijuana. She 
stopped the bus on Michigan and called her office, and 
suddenly the young men fled. She told us she stalled the 
bus for her own safety and ours because she did not want 
to ride with those persons who were pickpockets, and who 
regularly harass drivers and passengers on State Street at 
night. I appreciate her action." 

Armando Deluna (Limits garage) was appreciated by 
Ethel Breyley, of North Lake Shore Drive, for his courtesy 
as operator of a No. 156 LaSalle bus. "It was raining, and 
since I have a bad knee, I could not run for the bus. Driver 
No. 9137 saw me trying to hurry, and waited for me. It 
didn't waste more than a minute for him, but I was very 
thankful that he was so courteous. Farther down LaSalle 
Street, an older person got on with a walker cane, and 
even though it took him a while to get on and then off after 
a while, the driver was unfailingly courteous, saying, 'Take 
your time. Watch the wet steps.' " 

Charles Young (West Section) was the conductor of a 
Congress-O'Hare train ridden by Luella Rayman, of 
Seattle, Washington. "On my last day in Chicago before 
retiring in Seattle, I rode the subway from the Loop to 
Cumberland. That ride was the most pleasant I ever had. 
The conductor was very helpful in answering my questions 
on where to get off the train, and was kind and thoughtful 
of everyone. He greeted passengers with 'Have a good 
day!' He announced all the stations very clearly, and told 
how far north or west they were, which I had never heard 
done before. He is one great employee!" 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Honor three for service on A Day in CTA 




r ^ 



-J 



MMf^ r^? 821 * aBBy g— -g~=g-- M ^ r — a 




Certificates of special recognition were presented to Day in CTA honorees Hazel Love, 
ticket agent, 95th street; Harold Moore, bus service supervisor, District D, and Willie 
Glaspie, ticket agent, Howard street. Accompanying them on a tour of the Control Center 
are Michael LaVelle, manager of service (left), and James Washington (right), superinten- 
dent, Control Center. 



A ticket agent, who rushed to the 
aid of a woman being chased by a man 
at the North and Clybourn platform on 
the North-South rapid transit route 
recently, was given special recognition 
on "A Day in CTA." 

Willie Glaspie, a CTA employee for 
14 years, was working at the station 
when he heard the woman screaming 
for help. Glaspie told ploice he saw 
her run from the platform as she was 
being pursued by the man. The 
assailant fled as Glaspie confronted 
him, but police were able to make an 
arrest after the ticket agent gave them 
an accurate description of the of- 
fender. 

Two other CTA employees who 
were honored on "A Day in CTA" for 
outstanding performance of duty were 
Hazel Love, a ticket agent at 95th 
Street, and Harold Moore, bus service 
supervisor, District D. 

Ms. Love was working the midnight 
shift at 47th Street on the West-South 
route, when she foiled an attempted 
robbery by a man who approached 



her booth with a gun as she talked on 
the telephone with her relief. 

As the man demanded money, Ms. 
Love quickly moved away from the 
window and asked her relief to call 
agent control for help. The would-be 
holdup man fled from the station emp- 
ty handed. 

Supervisor Moore was off duty 
when he noticed a crowd of people 
leaving the Wilson Avenue rapid tran- 
sit station following a derailment in the 
Howard Street yard. Moore realized 
that riders were seeking alternate 
transportation as northbound trains 
were being turned back at Wilson 
Avenue, and moved quickly to pro- 
vide assistance. 

The off-duty supervisor asked 
several northbound Broadway bus 
operators scheduled to terminate at 
Foster Avenue to transport the strand- 
ed riders to Howard Terminal. Super- 
visor Moore worked to help minimize 
the delay and inconvenience to CTA 
riders until an on-duty supervisor ar- 
rived. 



Thanks for a job 
well done 

Employees who have received commendations 
from the publk 

Thomas Bonner. North Park 
Dwayne Borom, Limits 
Cornell Brown, 77th Street 
Earlie Bryant, North Avenue 
Donald Buegel, Douglas/ Congress 

Jean Cage, North Park 
David Calderon, 69th Street 
Paul Campbell, 77th Street 
Sergio Candelaria, Limits 
Lovie Chamblis, West Section 
James Collins, North Park 

Earmon Davis, Limits 
Martin Dzincioloski, Kedzie 

Elizabeth Erich, 77th Street 

Salvador Flores, North Avenue 

David Gage, Kedzie 
Jerry Gardner, North Park 
Leonard Gibbs III, North Park 
Edgar Griffin Jr., North Avenue 
Harold Gutierrez, North Park 

Julius Hammond, 69th Street 
Peyton Hightoiver, 77th Street 
Alexander Hiner Jr., North Park 
Charles Holley, Beverly 
Rosemary Hoskins, North Park 
Jesse Howard, 77th Street 
Bruce Hughes, North Section 
Margaret Hunt, Forest Glen 

Willie James, North Park 

Walter Kenerson, 77th Street 
James Ketchum Jr., North Avenue 

Sherman McKinney, Archer 
Eddie McMillan, Archer 
Are McMillion, North Park 
John Moutrey. Forest Glen 

William Reynolds, District C 
Jackie Robinson, Beverly 

Betty Samuel, 77th Street 
Vera Smith, Archer 
Robert Smith. Forest Glen 
Joseph Smith, Limits 
Larry Starks, Forest Glen 

Thelmer Walker. Kedzie 
Darnell Williams, North Park 
Robert Wilson, North Avenue 

Theresa Zamora, Kedzie 
Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 1 



YWCA nominates 
Juanita Duff for 
Rothschild award 




Juanita Duff, training coordinator at 
the Lawndale Maintenance Training 
Center, and one of the most active 
volunteers in the Assault and Rape 
Victim Advocate Program, was a 
YWCA nominee for the 1984 
Rothschild Heart of Gold Award. 

The award is funded by a grant from 
the Hulda B. and Maurice L. 
Rothschild foundation which honors 
individuals who demonstrate out- 
standing and exemplary performance 
as volunteers in support of the mission 
and objectives of United Way member 
agencies. 

Mrs. Duff was one of more than 50 
volunteers nominated. Although she 
was not selected as a finalist, the 
16-year CTA employee said she was 
honored to have been nominated by 
the Women's Services Department of 
the Loop Center YWCA. 

Agencies of the 10 selected finalists 
each received a $1,000 award 
presented by United Way and 
Crusade of Mercy to acknowledge the 
volunteers for their counsel, comfort, 
and encouragement to others. 

YWCA officials said Mrs. Duff was 
nominated for the Rothschild Heart of 
Gold Award in recognition of her 
dedication and service for the past 
three years to Chicago Women 
Against Rape, the speakers bureau of 
the Loop YWCA Women's Services 
Department. 



Mrs. Duff has addressed a variety of 
groups on the subject of sexual 
assault, child sexual abuse and related 
violence. She also serves on the board 
of Chimera, Inc., a not-for-profit self 
defense program for women. 

A letter supporting the YWCA 
recommendation for the Rothschild 
award said, "---Mrs. Duff has em- 
braced, and effectively exemplifies the 
YWCA's commitment to the critical 
importance of working together 
toward the creation of a society free 
from the threat and reality of 
violence.---" 

CTA's Assault and Rape Victim Ad- 
vocate Program is an innovative pro- 
ject jointly designed by CTA and the 
Loop YWCA in 1981. 



South shops 
worker and wife 
called "Mr. and 
Mrs. Nice Guy" 



Here is Gundermann's story about 
seven-year CTA employee Moore and 
his wife, reprinted with permission of 
the Park Forest Star. 

I would like to nominate my 
neighbors, Bobby and Gloria Moore bf 
Park Forest for a "Mr. and Mrs. Nice 
Guy." Here is my story: 

During the 34 years I have lived in 
Park Forest I have had some fine 
neighbors (still do) but one young cou- 
ple is special. Bobby and Gloria Moore 
always were helpful when my wife was 
slowly dying of cancer. But since she 
passed away about a year and a half 
age, they have been super. 

On the day of my wife's wake, they 
showed up at the door with a big plat- 
ter of fried chicken, a bowl of potato 
salad, a bowl of tossed salad, a bowl of 
spaghetti and a basket of baking 
powder biscuits. My three grown 
children, their families and I were 
aghast. We thought this old custom of 
neighborly hospitality, common 50 or 
more years ago, was now extinct. 

But that was only the beginning. 




Bob, Tanya, Gloria and Cindy Moore 

Carpenter journeyman Bobby 
Moore, Body Shop area. South 
Shops, and his wife, Gloria, are such 
special people to one of their south 
suburban Park Forest neighbors that 
they were the subject of a recent news 
column. 

Phil Gundermann is so pleased to 
have such friends as the Moores that 
he wrote his community newspaper, 
The Star, about his neighbors, 
nominating them "Mr. and Mrs. Nice 
Guy" for the paper's "Dimensions" 
column, a regular feature of the 
semiweekly publication. 



Since then the Moores have 
"adopted" me -- stuffing me with food, 
doing all kinds of chores and helping 
to solve the problems of a 74-year-old 
retiree. 

What makes all this even more 
unusual is that they're black, I'm 
white. They're Jehovah's Witnesses, 
I'm a drop-out Catholic. 

My message to the world is: Don't 
panic if a black family moves into the 
block even if they're Jehovah's 
Witnesses. 

They might turn out to be the best 
neighbors you ever had. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Chuck Norris 

film shot 

on CTA route 



Photographs by Bob Ryan 



Detective Eddie Cusack (Chuck Norris) lands a punch which sends a suspect (Alex 
Stevens) to the deck of this CTA 6000-series train. A platform erected atop the train by 
carpenters at Skokie Rail Shops provided an extra margin of safety for the actors. 




CTA is in the movies again! This time 
Chuck Norris and Chicago starlett Molly 
Hagen are featured in Code of Silence, 
a police drama about a Chicago detec- 
tive. 

Shot on location and directed by 
Chicagoan Andy Davis, the film depicts 
scenes in Chicago's inner Loop and in- 
cludes action which makes use of CTA 
5-50 series rail cars and the Wells Street 
bridge, with actors jumping from the 
roof of the train into the Chicago River. 

In the scenario. Detective Eddie 
Cusack (Norris) is suspicious of a cover- 
up in the accidental shooting of an inno- 
cent bystander, which adds to tensions 
between the warring factions of a drug- 
dealing family and its underworld 
counterpart. 




Camaramen focus on Chuck Norris and his co-star during filming of Code 
of Silence in Chicago's inner Loop. 



Molley Hagen, a native Chicagoan who 
stars with Actor Chuck Norris, pauses for 
the camera as she prepares to board a 
CTA train. 

A fight scene in the action-oriented 
Orion Productions film takes place atop 
the CTA train as the good guy (Norris) 
comes face-to-face with the bad guy 
(Alex Stevens). 

In the interest of safety, and because 
the studio asked, carpenters at Skokie 
Rail Shops, under the direction of 
George Haenisch. superintendent, Rail 
Vehicle Shops, built a platform atop the 
rail cars to extend the width and provide 
better footing for the actors and the 
camera crew during this action-packed 
scene. 

Bob Ryan. CTA Public Affairs special 
projects coordinator, was liaison during 
the filming. Train movements were 
coordinated by Bob Janz, director. Rail 
Service, with assistance by assistant 
district superintendent John Blum, and 
rail supervisors Sid Edwards. Jack Pritt. 
and Leon Hedgewood. 



7985 Vol. 38— No. 1 




Jerry Walters (left), acting unit supervisor, shares the moment of pride 
with four South Shops foremen as they display first place ZAP cer- 
tificates. They are (from left) Ed Meskimen, Print shop; Ernest 
Johnson, Machine shop; John Garner, Electrical shop; and John 
Dopak, Radio shop. 



Howard and Linden terminals joined forces 
as a team to bring a first place ZAP cer- 
tificate to their locations. Accepting on 
behalf of the two locations is Lou Gerard 
(left), acting foreman. Making the presenta- 
tion is Dave Kowalski, unit supervisor. 



Beverly, 5J 
striving fou 

Maintenance persori 
to be headed for the cl 
ding to tallies in the ri 
gram which was desigi 
in bus and rail maintea 

The southside garacrl 
and third quarters witjj 
and records indicate i| 
fourth quarter with a i 
luncheon, previously ia 
garage. 

Personnel at 54th ty 
catered lunch as the;; 
secutive quarter with; 
ZAP certificate. 

Other third quartern 
ners were Forest Gleig 
terminals, Bus Shops 

Ronald Benshish, §1 
the 18 areas at Bus ■ 
Shops areas had zercin 

Winners in the thiaj 
gram were treated tc:4 




Beverly garage completed the second and third 
quarters with a first place ZAP award. Records in- 
dicate the southside garage could finish the fourth 
quarter with zero accidents and earn a catered 
lunch. Presenting the first place third quarter cer- 
tificate is Walter Bailey, unit supervisor (left). Ac- 
cepting is Jim O'Brien, day foreman. 



Nine of the 18 areas at Bus Shops completed the third quarter with zero accidents 
Displaying some of the first place ZAP certificates earned at Bus Shops are (from left 
Oliver Ross, foreman, area 314, Blacksmith Shop; Bob Hargrove, leader, area 318 
Body Shop; Winman Tevis, foreman, area 313, Print Shop; Robert Mandijano, actmt 
foreman, area 321, Upholstery Shop; John Kurgon, acting unit supervisor. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




R 



D 




h terminal 
itered lunch 

it Beverly garage appear 
:;d catered lunch, accor- 
ing Zero Accident Pro- 
) curb personnel injuries 
i shops. 

npleted both the second 
st place ZAP certificate, 
Jeverly could finish the 
iccident rate to earn the 
•d twice by Forest Glen 

ial are also striving for a 
plete their second con- 
njuries and a first place 

ace ZAP certificate win- 
je, Howard/Linden rail 
Skokie Rail Shops, 
specialist, said nine of 
. and 11 of the 13 Rail 
es for the third quarter, 
-ter Zero Accident Pro- 
i and rolls. 




Richard Juvinall (left) superintendent, Sup- 
port Services, and Joe Ficarella, acting pro- 
duction coordinator. Rail Shops, proudly 
display a first place ZAP certificate. 



Eleven of 13 areas at Rail Shops completed the third quarter with zero in- 
juries. Displaying certificates are (from left) Clarence Mills, foreman, area 
419, Motor Line; Ken Blocker, foreman, area 423, Blacksmith/Welding; Jan 
Broda, foreman, area 417, Paint Shop, and Frank Vukovics, unit super- 
visor. 




tenance personnel at the 54th rail terminal show off their third 
ter first place ZAP certificates. The terminal completed both se- 
' and third quarters with zero injuries and is striving for a first place 
din the fourth quarter to qualify for the catered lunch. Members of 
iroup are (rear, from left) John Schram, Kurt Pate, Pat Soden, Dave 
ski, George Klein, Hugo Padilla, John Heneghan, and Bud Schaaf. 
'ling in the front row are (from left) Felix Velinske, assistant 
nan, and Steve Jackson, day foreman. 



First place ZAP certificates were also displayed at Rail Shops by Muzio 
Ficarella, foreman, area 429, Sub-electrical; James House, foreman, area 
427, Degreasing; Vito Pontrelli, foreman, area 418, Armature room; Bill 
Meany, leader, area 422, Shop Service; Mark Dundovich, unit supervisor, 
and Pat Langosch, foreman, area 424, Machine Shop 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 1 




A contestant in CTA's first Bus Roadeo approaches the offset street maneuver as he 
leaves the serpentine, just two of the 11 roadeo maneuvers contestants must negotiate. 
The 1985 Bus Roadeo garage level event is slated for June 2 and 9. The final event for 
Soldier Field will be announced later. 



Roadeo, Roundup, 
other events 
coming soon^na 



If the winter blahs have got you 
down, and you're looking for a break 
in your routine, perhaps you should 
consider the 1985 Bus Roadeo. Third 
Rail Roundup, Ticket Agent TieUp, or 
the Maintenance Roadeo. 

As the winter months begin to fade 
into spring, thoughts in the Operations 
Division as well as the Equipment 
Engineering and Maintenance Division 
are turning to their respective competi- 
tions. Hopes are high for increased 
participation as Operations launches 
its fifth annual Bus Roadeo. It will be 
the third competition for the Third Rail 
Roundup, and the Ticket Agent TieUp 
promises a continued challenge for its 
second event. 

Meanwhile, Equipment Engineering 
and Maintenance personnel will gear 
up for a new challenge in their second 
annual Maintenance Roadeo and their 
first Rail Maintenance Roundup. 

Operating employees, ticket agents, 
and maintenance personnel are en- 
couraged to check bulletin boards and 
make inquiries of garage and station 
superintendents, instructors, super- 
visors, and shop foremen for informa- 
tion. Non-operating personnel are en- 
couraged to participate as judges in 



the events. 

Prospective Bus Roadeo and Ticket 
Agent TieUp contestants may pick up 
applications March 3—16. Applica- 
tions for Third Rail Roundup con- 
testants will be available March 
17 — 30. Eligible applicants for both 
the bus and ticket agent events will be 
posted March 24, and eligible rail con- 
testants April 7. 

Other competition activities will be 
according to the following schedule: 
Written tests. Ticket Agent TieUp, 
April 1—5; Bus Roadeo, April 1 — 14; 
Third Rail Roundup, April 14—21. 
Bus garage level competition is set for 
June 2 and June 9, and the Winning 
Circle 20 is expected to be posted by 
June 23. A date for the 1985 Bus 
Roadeo final competition at Soldier 
Field will be announced later. 

The Ticket Agent TieUp section 
level performance competition is set 
for April 13— May 12 and posting of 
finalists is expected May 19. TieUp 
final is planned for June 23. 

Third Rail Roundup terminal com- 
petition is planned for April 28— 
May 5, and Roundhouse 18 posting is 
slated for May 19 with the final com- 
petition planned for June 23. 



O'Hare service 
is praised 

Good Morning. 

I am sure that the majority of your 
letters are complaints and negative: 
not so with this letter. 

On Wednesday. November 23, my 
son flew into O'Hare from college for 
the first time. For years 1 have been 
hearing ''horror stories" about the traf- 
fic into O'Hare on the day prior to 
Thanksgiving. We told our son to call 
us when he got his luggage and then 
go to the Rapid Transit and we would 
meet him at the Jefferson Park Sta- 
tion. That worked very well. 

On his return Sunday the 27th, 1 
rode with him to O'Hare, got him 
settled and returned via rapid transit to 
Jefferson Park. 

My point is to thank you for pro- 
viding this service to the airport. 1 will 
continue to use this service even dur- 
ing non-busy periods, since I travel 
regularly throughout the year. 

I am pleased to live in an area that 
makes life so convenient. My sincere 
compliments to you and to those who 
spearheaded the O'Hare extension. 

Sincerely, 

James H. Kleeberg 
Lincolnwood, IL 60645 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Jim McClain, superintendent, 
Ashland terminal, proudly ac- 
cepts the rapid transit Public 
Safety award plaque from 
Safety Manager Tom Boyle. The 
terminal experienced only one 
accident during the quarter and 
registered 91 accident-free 
days. 





Operators Joseph Lazzara (left) 
and Lena Jackson, named third 
quarter outstanding employees 
at Archer garage, share the 
honors as Superintendent 
Lionel Hampton (second from 
left) receives the Public Safety 
award for the garage from Safe- 
ty Manager Tom Boyle. 



► Archer garage and Ashland terminal were recepients of the 1984 third quarter Public 
Safety awards. It was Ashland's first Public Safety award since the 
second quarter of 1981. 
► The terminal earned its latest award after experiencing only one accident for the 
quarter and registering 91 accident-free days. 
►At Archer, meanwhile, it was the third consecutive 1984 Public Safety award for the 
southside facility which had 31 accident-free days during the quarter. Presentation of 
the Public Safety plaque by Manager of Safety Tom Boyle marked the 14th such 
honor for Archer garage since the award originated on January 1, 1961 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 1 



11 





mm 




AS REPORTED BY EMPLOYEES OF THE CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 



Welcome to Inside News. This column is devoted to vignettes of special 
interest to you and about CTA employees. Volunteers from each work location 
are being sought to help make this one of the most-read features of Transit News. 
If you're interested in reporting the many amusing experiences and other interesting 
news tidbits of your coworkers, please contact our editor. 

Inside News will run the gamut of outstanding accomplishments, projects, weddings, 
births, graduations, trips, and a variety of other items which might be of interest to you 
and your co-workers. The only restrictions will be available space, and good taste. 



LOVE IS BLOSSOMING THROUGHOUT CTA. 

JOHN G. GAUL, senior planner in Operations Planning, 
and MARGARET C. LEE were married August 25 in St. 
Bernardine Church, Forest Park... LYNN RITTER, 
automatic passenger counter specialist, also of Operations 
Planning, exchanged the holy vows on September 1 when 
she became the bride of GAYLORD OTTE at a wedding 
ceremony in Grace 
Lutheran Church of 
Evanston... .WILLIE and 
NORA MITCHNER 
became husband and wife 
on October 29, at a 
ceremony held in the 
Seventh Presbyterian 
Church. He is a bus 
operator at the 77th Street 
garage, and she is an order 
taker-scheduler at the 
Washington garage. Both 
are former Travel Informa- 
tion Center represen- 
tatives. We wish all of our 
newlyweds happiness and 
good luck. mije gnd Norg Mitchner 

CTA-SHINING WITH THE STARS. ...Once again, all 
CTA employees who responded generously to the call for 
support from our Chairman, Michael Cardilli, for the 
United Cerebral Palsy Fund Drive made it possible to pre- 
sent a check for $15,000. during the WLS-TV Channel 7 
Telethon, held on Saturday, January 12, and Sunday. 
January 13. This project was coordinated by Betty B. Ed- 
wards, manager of Community Affairs, who was assisted 
by all her staff. Thanks to all who supported this worthy 
endeavor. Let's keep it up! 

WHAT A NICE FEELING. ...The one that comes from 
sharing and participating in a worthy cause. 1984 ended 
reflecting the true generous and compassionate feelings of 
the CTA people for the less fortunate. Many employees 




donated blood for American Red Cross and United Blood 
Services. Many others brought food to be donated to 
Mayor Washington's "Share It" Program and others, or 
perhaps even the same people, signed up for payroll 
deductions to give their donations to the United Way 
Crusade of Mercy. This is beautiful and hopefully those 
who could not participate this year will do so next year. 

JOSE FLORES, a ticket agent out of North Section, is 
also president of the Pan American Lions Club where he is 
endlessly involved in worthy projects to help the needy. 
One of his most current projects is to help El Hogar del 
Nino (Home of the Child). For starters he recruited the ef- 
forts of some of his members and installed a new floor at 
the center located at 2325 S. California. The Lions also 
held a benefit dance February 9 at the Holiday Inn City 
Centre. 

RUTH BROWN, an interviewer in the Personnel Depart- 
ment, has been attending the Moody Bible Institute for the 
past five years. She wants to be a Sunday Bible Teacher, a 
goal we hope she attains in the very near future. 

A STAR IS BORN....ARTHELLA BROWN, a confiden- 
tial office assistant in Labor Relations, has a beautiful sing- 
ing voice, and she became a celebrity last October when 
she participated at a talent contest aboard the SS Norway 
during a seven-day Caribbean Cruise. She was the first 
person to ever sing a gospel song on that popular cruise 
ship. She received a certiticate, naming her as an 
Honorary Viking. She also received a gold plate. She is a 
gospel singer with the First Church of Deliverance Choir, 
and she has participated on a number of occasions in the 
weekly program at WCFL-AM radio, directed by Rev. 
Eugene Gray, pastor of the church. 

THE STORK WORKED FULL TIME IN 1984. ...Con 

gratulations to the new parents: bundles of joy are keeping 
RUTH LeBRON. PATRICIA MANSKER, GERI 
TAPL1NG, and LAURA SCANNELLA busy with diapers 
and bottles. For ENNA de ALBA, a bus servicer at 77th 
Street, the stork worked double time: she became the 
mother of twin girls on December 4. 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Fred King retires, begins consultant service 



More than 140 people packed the 
Merchandise Mart M&M Club on 
December 12 for a testimonial lun- 
cheon honoring Frederick G. King, 
CTA Deputy Executive Director, 
Human Resources, who retired 
January 1. 

Sharing the special occasion with 
King were: his wife, Barbara, and five 
of his six children; his mother, Mrs. 
Helen King, from Charleston, West 
Va.; his sister, Mrs. Helena Ward, 
from CTA Materials Management, his 
niece, Yvonne Ward of Schaumburg, 
and his mother-in-law, Mrs. Alma 
Williams. 

CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli, 
and Executive Director Bernard J. 
Ford praised King for his 27-year 




A special guest of honor was King's 
mother, Mrs. Helen King, who slipped into 
town from Charleston, West Va., to sur- 
prise her son on his retirement. Enjoying 
the reaction is Mrs. Delores Brooks. 

career with CTA, which began when 
he first joined the Authority in 1954 as 
a bus operator. After a brief hiatus 
spent in the U.S. Postal Service, he 
returned to CTA in 1957 to resume a 
career in transportation. 

In 1962, after earning a Bachelor of 
Science degree in electrical engineer- 
ing from Chicago Technical College, 
King was assigned as an electrical 
engineer in the rapid transit system 
where he designed electrical circuits 
and prepared drawings. He also 
served as project manager of the exact 
fare program and assistant project 
manager for CTA's capital develop- 
ment program. 

King assumed responsibility for 
CTA's affirmative action, equal 
employment opportunity, and minori- 
ty business enterprise programs when 
he was named manager of Human 




Fred, his wife Barbara, and CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli admire one of the gilts 
presented to the honoree at his reception. Making the presentation are Mrs. Arthella 
Brown (left), Labor Relations, and Mrs. Betty Edwards, manager, Community Relations. 
Looking on is Louis Sanford, Operations. 



Relations in 1974. A year later he was 
named manager, Human 

Resources/Personnel. His appoint- 
ment by Chairman Cardilli as deputy 
executive director, Human Resources, 
came on March 1, 1984. 

As his CTA achievements con- 
tinued, King enhanced his personal 
development through the UMTA 
Management Training Program at 
Northeastern University in Boston, 
CTA's Management Education Pro- 
gram, and the Human Resources 
Development Training Program at 
Wharton School of Business, Universi- 
ty of Pennsylvania. 

King has launched a new career as 
head of Fred G. King and Associates, 



consultants for disadvantaged 
businesses seeking entry into federally 
funded projects. He is a resident of the 
West Chatham community where he 
is also active in civic and church work. 

At his testimonial luncheon, friends 
gave King a set of luggage, a gold 
watch, and a montage plaque 
representing facets of his CTA career. 
A reception, attended by 150 people, 
was held in the CTA Board room at 
the Merchandise Mart on December 
18. 

King's parting words to friends 
gathered at his retirement luncheon 
were: "Remember the rule of kites. 
Kites don't rise with the wind - - they 
rise against the wind." 




Calling it "quits" and saying farewell is Deputy Executive Director, Human Resources. 
Fred G. King. Co-workers with whom he has served in the last 27 years line up to bid him 
adieu. They are (left to right) Tom Wolgemuth, Facilities Engineering and Maintenance; 
Elonzo Hill and Robert Desvignes, Operations; Chris Kalogeras. Architectural Design; 
and George Millonas, Equipment Engineering and Maintenance. 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 1 



13 



Gems for Margaret 



Plans travel, golf 




About 125 friends and co-workers attended a retirement 
party honoring Ms Margaret Walker, 64, who marked the 
end of her 34-year career with the CTA. The December 6 
party was held in the CTA Board room. Ms Walker was a 
voucher audit clerk, Accounts Payable, Financial Services 
department. Friends gave her a ruby and diamond ring as a 
farewell tribute which she shows to Dennis McFadden, 
supervisor, Materials and Payables Accounting, and her 
sister, Mrs Mable Edie. Ms Walker, who lives in Oak Lawn, 
plans to travel and visit a niece who lives in Hong Kong. 

H Developing craftwork 




Financial Services payroll clerk Doris Yost received her 
retirement packet from Gerald Kurowski, supervisor, 
Payroll, in a Board Room reception December 13 that was 
also attended by John Cannon (left), superintendent, Ac- 
counting Operations, and Brian Jakubowski, assistant 
supervisor, Payroll. After 29 years of service with CTA, 
Doris expects to spend more time developing her craftwork 
techniques in her Norwood Park home, on the Northwest 
Side, where she lives with her husband, Fred. 




Clarence Riley (right) marked the end of a 31-year CTA 
career at a December 14 party in the Mart Plaza Holiday Inn 
attended by some 50 people. Jim Stewart (left), Director, 
Equipment Engineering, presented Riley with a scale model 
of a M.A.N, articulated (Big Bend) bus made by Riley's 
friends at South Shops. The honoree also received a set of 
book ends made from air compressor pistons made by 
friends at Skokie Shop, and a cash gift. Riley who retired 
January 1, lives on the southwest side. He plans to travel 
and play golf. 

■ No more Chicago winters 




June Van Camp, assistant title and rental agent, studies her 
retirement packet held by Merritt Kotin , (right) director, Real 
Estate, joined by her supervisor, Phil Adelizzi. Chicago 
winters will soon be little more than news items for Van 
Camp, a 29-year CTA veteran, who plans to move from her 
home in Uptown, on the North Side, to the Gulf coast of 
Florida. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Service anniversaries 
in January 

40 Years 

Vema Hartney, Ashland Terminal 

35 Years 

Clarence Mathews. North Rail District 
Jesse Richardson. Ashland Terminal 
Robert Suta. North Bus Personnel 
Douglas Williams, Ashland Terminal 
Fred Zimmerman. North Rail District 

30 Years 

Felix Black. Stores-South 

Maurice O'Connor. Blacksmith & Welding 

George Weathers. South Rail Personnel 

25 Years 

Thomas Blaney. Ashland Terminal 
Arnold Campbell. Forest Glen 
Thomas Houston. Special Services 
Jerry Johnson, Operations Control 
Domlcella Kalwaslnskl. Printing 
Robert Lucas, Kedzie 
Donald McKlnney, Bus Instruction 
Daniel Quagllano, Howard/Kimball 
William Staunton. North Park 



January Pensioners 

MAURY ADAMS. Motorman. 

Douglas. Emp. 1-11-49 
STANLEY ANDREWS. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen, Emp. 1-12-59 
ARTHUR ARDU1NI. Lineman. 

West Shops. Emp 7-17-47 
BERNARD ARMSTRONG. Supervisor, 

Jefferson Park. Emp 10-19-59 
ROBERT BARCLAY. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 11-30-48 
HOMER BARRON Jr . Warehouse Wrkr I, 

West Shops. Emp. 4-17-58 
HARVEY BECKER. Bus Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp 5-8-58 
TYDIS BERNARD. Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp 3-9-64 
LOUIS BIEN1EK, Instructor. 

Forest Glen, Emp, 12-14-53 
THOMAS BODIE, Telephone Oper . 

77th Street, Emp 10-7-52 
ROBERT BOOTH, Mat & Assign Disp .. 

West Shops. Emp 10-11-48 
JAMES BRENNAN, Traffic Checker, 

Operations Planning. Emp 5-1-46 
ELMER BRISKEY. Bus Operator. 

North Avenue, Emp 4-1-46 
CHARLES BROWN, Bus Servicer. 

Kedzie. Emp 11-5-48 
FLOYD BURNS, Ticket Agent. 

63rd/Ashland. Emp 7-1-54 
GEORGE BUTLER. Janitor. 

77th Street, Emp 6-11-53 
JAMES CARTER. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 6-25-53 
RAY CARTER, Bus Operator. 

Limits, Emp 11-23-59 
WILLIE CARTER. Clerk. 

77th Street. Emp 2-26-53 
JOHN CAPACCIO. Car Repairer. 

Rosemont. Emp 2-9-48 
HORACE CHATMAN. Bus Operator, 

Beverly. Emp. 2-27-51 
ROBERT CHRISTMON. Hvy Dry Equip 

Oper . West Shops. Emp 10-29-59 
CLEMENCEAU CHAPMAN. Laborer. 

West Shops. Emp 8-9-51 
WILLIE COOPER. Bus Repairer, 

69th Street, Emp 7-21-48 



JOHN COX. Bus Repairer. 

Forest Glen. Emp 2-15-47 
MILFORD CUMBERLANDER. Serv. Trk. 

Chauf , West Shops. Emp 4-4-50 
DANIEL DALEY. Supervisor. 

Central District. Emp 6-29-53 
JOHN DeGROAT, Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 11-12-53 
AMERICO DiGIANFlLIPPO.Car Rprmn A . 

Wilson Shop. Emp 2-8-49 
JOHN DOPAK. Sheet Mil Foreman. 

South Shops. Emp 2-24-58 
KATY DUNN. Ticket Agent. 

Lake Street. Emp 8-4-47 
GERALD FELS. Bus Operator. 

North Park. Emp 10-14-54 
DANIEL HTZGIBBON. Serv Trk 

Chauf., West Shops. Emp. 3-21-52 
FARRELL GALLAGHER. Box Puller. 

69th Street, Emp 1-24-46 
LAWRENCE GIRLICH, Laborer A, 

West Shops, Emp. 1-23-62 
ROBERT GLOVER, Rail Janitor. 

Madison/Wabash. Emp. 12-16-68 
ANTONIO GRANATA. Perf Contr Spclst.. 

Operations. Emp 2-16-72 
LINO GUERRA. Engine Washer, 

North Park, Emp 8-16-78 
CURTIS HAGANS, Bus Operator, 

77th Street. Emp 11-18-57 
RICHARD HAMMONDS. Trackman II. 

West Shops. Emp 5-11-51 
JAMES HAYNIE. Painter, 

South Shops, Emp 2-23-50 
RAY HELM, Bus Operator. 

Beverly, Emp 11-15-54 
BURNETT HENDERSON. Superintendent, 

Beverly, Emp. 12-18-52 
JOHN HOLIMAN, Rail Janitor, 

Madison/Wabash, Emp. 10-14-52 
OTIS HYNSON. Traffic Checker, 

Operations Planning, Emp 5-27-54 
CHARLES JOHNSON. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 10-22-53 
CHARLES L JOHNSON, Bus Operator, 

77th Street. Emp. 3-19-53 
JOSEPH JOHNSON. Clerk. 

61st Street, Emp 9-20-52 
ERNEST KAYE. Carpenter. 

South Shops. Emp 9-28-70 
RAYMOND KLAUB, Sheet Mil Foreman. 

South Shops, Emp 7-29-46 
FREDERICK KING, Deputy Exec Dir . 

Human Resources. Emp 5-3-57 
WILLIAM KNIGHT, Bus Operator. 

North Park. Emp 8-2-54 
BERNARD KONIARSKI, Bus Operator, 

North Park, Emp 6-7-48 
RANDOLPH LEWIS. Bus Operator. 

77th Street, Emp 4-29-52 
WILLIAM LIDDELL, Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen. Emp. 5-19-47 
HERMAN LOUISVILLE. Switchman. 

63rd/Ashland. Emp 9-19-52 
LENRO LUMPKIN. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp. 2-1-51 
P1ERINO MANNARELLI. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 9-27-47 
HENRY MARTIN, Bus Operator, 

77th Street. Emp 4-30-59 
CLARENCE MATHEWS. Rail Supervisor. 

North Section. Emp 1-19-50 
ARTHUR MAXWELL. Frmn. Exc. Srvcmn 

West Shops. Emp 4-24-46 
PATRICK McGING. Plumber. 

West Shops. Emp 7-31-50 
HOWARD McMILLAN. Srv Trk Chauf . 

West Shops. Emp 2-6-51 
RUFUS McMILLIAN, Rail Janitor. 

Madison/Wabash. Emp. 10-15-51 
ROBERT MILLER. Bus Operator. 

Archer. Emp 9-27-54 
GEORGE MITCHELL. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 9 4-56 
EDWARD MURRAY. Bus Repairer. 
Forest Glen. Emp 11-26-46 



TEDDIE NIEZABITOWSKI. Bus Repairer 

69th Street, Emp 9-24-46 
CALVIN OLDHAM. Srv Trk. Chauf . 

West Shops. Emp 8-31-53 
EDWIN OLEKSY. Sheet Mil Wkr Ldr . 

South Shops. Emp 8-24 59 
VICTOR PACISKI. Bus Operator. 

Beverly. Emp 11 19-46 
EUGENE PAGE. Machinist. 

South Shops, Emp 10 15-68 
NELLO PARR1LLO. Motor Cleaner. 

Desplatnes, Emp 2-12 57 
ARTHUR PAIGE. Bus Operator. 

Archer. Emp 11-2-50 
JOHN PHILLIPS. Mail Clerk. 

Mail Service. Emp 10-6-43 
SAMUEL POLLOCK. Conductor. 

61st Street, Emp 2-26-51 
JEFFERY QUALLS. Bus Operator, 

77th Street. Emp 10-15-53 
VERNON RAGE, Chief Clerk, 

Limits, Emp. 12-15-38 
JOE RAYBURN, Car Repairer. 

61st Street. Emp 10-15-56 
JOSEPH R1CCARDO. Srv Truck Chauf 

West Shops. Emp 2-27-61 
CLARENCE RILEY. Equip Tech. III. 

Equip Engr & Maint . Emp 2-16-53 
WILLIAM RILEY. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 9-9-57 
OTIS ROUNDS, Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 9-14-53 
MARJOR1E SEWARD. Ticket Agent. 

95th Street. Emp 12-20-56 
HELEN SLATTERY. Typist 1. 

Skokie Shops. Emp 8 29-67 
BILLY SMALL, Bus Operator. 

North Park. Emp 3-21-55 
EDWARD STACK. Chief Clerk, 

Archer, Emp 9-24-47 
CHARLES STARR. Elec Worker. 

South Shops. Emp. 9-9-42 
FRANK STEEN Jr . Car Repairer A. 

Racine Shops, Emp. 1-17-57 
JAMES STEWART, Bus Operator. 

77th Street, Emp 10-12-53 
JOSEPH STUDLEY, Foreman. 

West Shops. Emp 2-10-47 
WILLIE SUDDUTH, Car Repairer A. 

Racine Shops. Emp. 12-20-50 
GONZALO VALDEZ. Box Puller. 

Archer. Emp. 8-3-53 
JUNE VAN CAMP. Asst Title Rental Agt , 

Law. Emp. 9-17-55 
GARRETT VAUGHT. Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp 8-28-51 
MARGARET WALKER.Voucher Audit Clerk 

Matrk & Pay Acctg.. Emp 3-1-50 
WYLIE WEBB, Bus Operator, 

77th Street. Emp 5-8-46 
ERVING WEILER, Bus Operator. 

Beverly. Emp. 6-10-54 
RICHARD WILSON. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp 8-19-54 
EDWARD WISNIEWSK1. Car Servicer. 

Rosemont. Emp 11-2-59 

Disability Retirements 

JAMES ADAMS. Motorman. 
Kimball, Emp 2 27-70 



I3ST JVIEJVrOR.I^.JVE 



JAMES ANDORKA. 69. West Shops. 

Emp 7-10-46. Died 11-21-84 
EMIL BECK. 90. Beverly. 

Emp 10 24-28. Died 11-17-84 
JASPER BELLAFIORE.73. Shops & Equip 

Emp 5-25-47. Died 10 09 84 



JOHN DePAULA. 75. North Avenue. 

Emp 9 5 46. Died 10 24 84 
JULIA DUFFY, 87, West Section. 

Emp 5 5 43. Died 10 29 84 
CHARLES EDMONSON. 81. 69th Street. 

Emp 12 28 28. Died 11 26 84 
MICHAEL FADDEN. 84. South Section, 

Emp 3 15 26. Died 10 29 84 
ARTHUR FOURNIER. 75. Shops & Equip 

Emp 9 24 42. Died 10 14 84 
GARNETT HAWKINS. 77. West Section. 

Emp 10 16 52. Died 10 24 84 
RALPH HODGES. 81. Engineering. 

Emp 6 1 43. Died 11 21 84 
RUTH HUGHES. 83. Accounting. 

Emp 6 29 44. Died 10 15 84 
CHARLES JOHNSON. 81. Shops & Equip 

Emp 2-19-43. Died 10 15-84 
HERBERT JONES. 81. North Avenue. 

Emp 11-4-42. Died 9 6-84 
JOHN KALTSAS. 65. Ashland. 

Emp 12-4-45. Died 10 15-84 
PATRICK KANE. 78. North Park. 

Emp 12 9 42. Died 10 27 84 
PAUL KAROWSKY. 68. North Section. 

Emp 11 16 42. Died 10 31-84 
JAMES KENNEDY. 85. Archer. 

Emp 12-11 33. Died 10 13 84 
EDMUND KLEDZ1K, 76. North Avenue. 

Emp 7 24 41. Died 10 30 84 
JOHN KL1MA, 70, Utility 

Emp 7 29-41. Died 11 23-84 
JOSEPH LUBAWY. 65, Sales Risk Mgmt . 

Emp 11 25 40. Died 11-16-84 
LOUIS MALNASSY, 102, Transportation. 

Emp 5-31-45. Died 10 7 84 
EDITH MAURO. 69. West Section. 

Emp 7 31 54. Died 10 10 84 
PATRICK McMANUS. 92. North Section. 

Emp 5-5- 17. Died 9 27 84 
LEROY NELSON, 66. Forest Glen. 

Emp 4-22 54. Died 10-3-84 
FRANK NICHOLSON St . 77. Special Invest , 

Emp 1-7-63, Died 10-30-84 
FRANCIS ODOHERTY. 90. 77th Street. 

Emp 12 -31 19. Died 10 13 84 
JOSEPHINE OSULLIVAN.81. North Section 

Emp 6-17 46. Died 10 14-84 
CARMEN PAOLO. 88. Way & Structures. 

Emp 11 16 23. Died 11 22-84 
HENRY PIOTROWSKI, 84. 61st Street. 

Emp 2-7-30. Died 11-27-84 
FRANK RUSSELL. 83. Central District. 

Emp 9 19 28. Died 9- 10 84 
LEON SALISBURY, 87, Accounting. 

Emp 8-17-16, Died 10-9-84 
ANDREW SCAF1DI. Shops & Equipment. 

Emp 9 5 41, Died 1984 
FREDERICK SCHADE, 71. Limits. 

Emp 3-24 43. Died 10-5-84 
NICHOLAS SCIMECA. 74, Shops & Equip 

Emp 1 8-44. Died 10 3 84 
FINLEY SHRINKS, 80. South Section. 

Emp 1 29 45. Died 10 19 84 
JOHN SULLIVAN. 93. Devon. 

Emp 8 11 21. Died 11 23 84 
MARTIN SWANSON. 76. 77th Street. 

Emp 3 29 27. Died 11 27-84 
CARL THORKELSON. 92. 77th Street. 

Emp 5 26 21. Died 10 15 84 
MARION TOMETICH. 79. Engineering, 

Emp 6 16-24. Died 10 24 84 
JOHN VITELLO. 71. Engineering. 

Emp 5 1 36, Died 10 9 84 
FRANK VYZRAL. 78. Treasury. 

Emp 9 27 29. Died 10 17 84 
ELWEARD WILLIAMSON. 86. Claim. 

Emp 9 24 30. Died 11 26 84 
EDMUND W1TKOWSKI. 74. Forest Park 

Emp 8 2345. Died 10 28 84 
KILLIAN ZAHN. 79. Keeler 

Emp 1 8-45. Died 10 2 84 
VINCENT ZITO. 83. Engineering. 

Emp 7 24 28, Died 10 22 84 
BERT ZODY. 73. North Avenue. 

Emp 12 21 36. Died 10 12 84 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 1 



15 




Pioneers Set 
'85 schedule 

The CTA Pioneers Retirement 
Club, 550 strong, observed its ninth 
anniversary last December in the 
Golden Flame restaurant, Nagle and 
Higgins avenues. The club meets there 
for a noon lunch the second Tuesday 
of each month. In 1985, the club will 
hold four special days for members 
and guests. The days are Feb. 12 
-Valentine party. May 14 - Mother's 
Day party, September 10 - Back to 
School party, and December 10 
-Christmas party. For more informa- 
tion, telephone Walter Steinbeiss at 
334-8149. 



Officers of CTA Pioneers Retirement Club for 1985 are (from left) George Nash, 2nd vice 
president; Mel Horning, 1st vice president; Frank Koziol, president; Warren Sertoli, 
treasurer, and Walter Steinbeiss, secretary. 



Weekend Passport of enrichment 

The Field Museum of Natural History offers a fun way to delve into natural history 
every Saturday and Sunday for you and family members. 

The Weekend Passport of enriching entertainment runs the gamut of activity from 
archaic Egyptian mummies to mounted animals which are so life-like, it's hard to 
believe they are not alive. 

Visitors are taken inside the world of natural history through tours, demonstra- 
tions, slide lectures and films related to museum exhibits. 

Among highlights for the month of March is "Treasures from the Totem Forest," a 
March 23 tour which introduces the Indians of southeast Alaska and British Colum- 
bia, their totem poles and masks. For other weekend listings check the Weekend 
Passport at Museum entrances. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 

Volume38 Number 1 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editor: Rick Willis 
Graphic Designers: Alexandra Eiva, Al Grady 
Contributing Writers: Robert A. Gaines, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department. 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others. $5. CTA TRANSIT NEWS. Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, 
Illinois 60654. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555. Chicago, Illinois 60654 



DOCUMENTS LIBRARIAN TN 

Govt. Publications Department 
Northwestern University Library 
Evanston, IL 60201 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



IM Jcl Transit News 



/q1.38, No.2, 1985, FoKIhicago Transit Authority, Employees and Retirees 

...CAR CARDS 

aid the search for 

MISSING CHILDREN.. 




-E^^<>"Tyou have any informalion about a missing child (312) 

=^=lCf please call the Chicago Police Department . . . 



ji& joins police effort to locate missing youths 




CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli and Chicago Police Department 
Youth Division Commander Joe P. Mayo observe the first press 
run of Missing Children car cards. 



Public Affairs staff members who developed and promoted the 
program are shown planning the second month's printing of car 
cards. From left: Ron Weslow, public information coordinator; 
Alan Grady, graphic designer/production assistant; Robert 
Gaines, special projects; and Terry Hocin, director, Promotional 
Services. 



When Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 
ordered that car cards with 
photographs and descriptions of miss- 
ing children be placed in all transit 
vehicles, CTA became the first transit 
property in the nation to assist police 
in finding missing children. 

Requests for information from other 
transit properties have been pouring in 
since the program was announced. 

Car cards produced by CTA Public 
Affairs, which bear the photographic 
likenesses of missing youths and perti- 
nent data on the youths, are being 
posted each month in all buses and 
trains in cooperation with 
TDI/Winston Advertising Network. 
The message on the cards asks CTA 
riders to "Please help us find our 
children." Cards also list the police 
department telephone number, 
744-6222, for persons with informa- 
tion to call. 

Cardilli said CTA will post four pic- 
tures of missing youths in buses and 
trains each month, and then turn the 
cards over to area shopping centers 
where they will be on display again. 
Authorities believe some missing 
children are kidnap victims abducted 
from shopping centers. 

Commander Joe P. Mayo, Chicago 
Police Youth Division, feels that the 
majority of unlocated youths are not 
kidnap victims, but, for a variety of 



reasons are runaways. "The fact that 
the Chicago Police Department and 
the CTA have involved themselves we 
hope will cause those children to think 
that someone does care, and would 
aid them in returning to their families," 
said Mayo. Last year more than one 
million young people were reported to 
police across the nation as missing. 

The special CTA public service pro- 
ject was developed by the CTA Public 
Affairs Department and spearheaded 
by the Promotional Services section. 
The project was coordinated with the 
Chicago Police Department's Youth 
Division, and artwork and printing ar- 
rangements were made by the CTA 
Publications section, producers of 
Transit News. 

The idea was conceived following a 
program which started when 
Hawthorne Melody Dairy began 
publishing pictures of missing children 
on its milk cartons. Both Hawthorne 
Melody and CTA have received na- 
tional media coverage for their bold 
public service efforts to help law en- 
forcement agencies locate missing 
youths. 

CTA Chairman Cardilli told CBS 
and Cable News Network reporters, 
"CTA has one million riders each mor- 
ning and evening who will be exposed 
to our car cards. We think this will 
help. At least there will be public 



awareness. I'm a parent and a grand- 
parent, and I've heard so much about 
missing children, and I'm concerned." 

The chairman also said, "We 
believe in this program so strongly that 
we want all of our riders to help in the 
search for Chicago area missing 
youths. I know that our one million 
daily riders will be another source for 
trying to locate or provide information 
to assist the Police Department in its 
efforts. We hope all Chicagoans will 
get involved in this all-important 
endeavor." 

Riders are being asked to key on 
numbers in the upper left hand corner 
of each picture when giving informa- 
tion to police about young people they 
may have seen who are known to be 
among the missing. 

Meanwhile, as attention continues 
to focus on the cooperation between 
CTA and the Chicago Police Depart- 
ment, CTA Chairman Cardilli and Ex- 
ecutive Director Bernard J. Ford have 
asked the American Public Transpor- 
tation Association to endorse CTA's 
volunteer program, as an inducement 
to help law enforcement across the na- 
tion in one of the most devastating 
problems facing parents and guardians 
of more than 500.000 young people 
throughout the United States who are 
still missing. eta 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Reserve Unit 
Citation 




Desplaines-Congress Superintendent Alex Wilson proudly displays Employer Support 
Award plaque and certificate of appreciation presented by Lieutenant James E. 
Siegman, Commander, 302nd Transportation Battalion at Glenview USAR Center. 
Wilson was accompanied by his wife, Mrs. Vera Wilson, and Staff Sergeant Wrather 
Adams. 



Desplaines-Congress superintendent 
receives Army Employer Support award 



Desplaines-Congress Superinten- 
dent Alex Wilson was honored by the 
302nd Transportation Battalion and 
the 86th U.S. Army Reserve Com- 
mand as he was presented the U.S. 
Army Reserve Employer Support 
Award in a January 19 ceremony at 
Glenview U.S. Army Reserve Center. 

Wilson was recommended for the 
honor by Wrather Adams, a 
Desplaines-Congress rapid transit con- 
ductor who serves as motor sergeant 
of the 302nd Transportation Battalion 
at Glenview. The Army also promoted 
Adams to the rank of staff sergeant in 
the same ceremony. 

A certificate of appreciation accom- 
panying the plaque noted that Wilson 
was honored for the "enthusiastic and 
patriotic support" which he rendered 



the U.S. Army Reserve Command 
(86th USARCOM) through "outstan- 
ding assistance to the command and 
the United States Army Reserve." 

The award is given in recognition of 
employers who give maximum sup- 
port to employee/reservists in the per- 
formance of their military training. 

Wilson, a CTA employee since 
1961. expressed appreciation for the 
award which was presented by Lieute- 
nant James E. Siegman, commander 
of the 302nd Transportation Battalion. 
Wilson was accompanied by his wife. 
Mrs. Vera Wilson. 

Adams has been a CTA employee 
for 15 years. Prior to joining the Army 
Reserve, he served in the U.S. Marine 
Corps for 25 months. He has nine 
years of active and reserve military ser- 

vice - eta 



From the Chairman 

For our children 

One of the most serious crises on 
a city-wide and nation-wide level is 
the growing number of missing 
children-more than 15,000 in the 
Chicago area and more than 
500,000 nation-wide. It causes per- 
sonal suffering for affected families 
and creates uncertainty and ap- 
prehension among all parents and a 
lack of confidence in the quality of 
life in our society. 

CTA has taken the lead in the 
transit industry by asking citizens to 
help locate missing children and 
return them to their families. We 
serve more than one million riders 
every day, and our transit advertis- 
ing is an excellent means of pro- 
viding information about missing 
children in hope that some of our 
riders might provide the police 
department with information about 
the children that may lead to their 
return. 

Our Missing Children car card 
program is an excellent example of 
cooperation between public and 
private agencies to serve the needs 
of the community. The Chicago 
Police Department is supplying 
photographs and information about 
the missing children, and 
TDI/Winston is providing free 
advertising space and posting the 
public service announcements. The 
program also has benefited from 
thorough and widespread print and 
electronic media coverage which has 
made the public aware that we need 
their help to solve this problem. 

As a parent and grandparent, I 
understand the suffering and ap- 
prehension that many parents must 
be experiencing, and I thank the 
employees of CTA and other agen- 
cies who have helped us implement 
the Missing Children car card pro- 
gram. 

We all can further assist in this 
endeavor by asking the merchants 
that we patronize in our own com- 
munities what they are doing to help 
find our missing children. This is no 
time to be a spectator! 




7985 Vol. 38 — No. 2 




Starred in Steve McQueen movie 



The Illinois Railway Museum at Union, Illinois, continues 
to build its fleet of nostalgic vehicles to the delight of visitors 
who flock to this historical show place of Chicagoland public 
transportation each spring and summer. 

Recently added to the yesteryear inventory of rail 
transportation are cars 6125 and 6126, a pair of 6000-series 
cars which made their final morning rush hour run on the 
Ravenswood route last June 25. The cars were then sent to 
Skokie Shops storage and retired July 11 to be purchased 
by the museum 

Cars 6125 and 6126 were part of CTA's original order of 
130 6000-series cars, and are the last of eight cars in the 
series to operate with trolley poles. The poles were removed 
in the late 60's. 

Museum operators say the 6000-series cars, coupled 
back-to-back in two-car units are all electric PCC Cars 
(Presidents' Conference Committee) modified for rapid 
transit use. 

The first of the 6000-series cars arrived in Chicago in 
August 1950. During the mid-50's, CTA installed trolley 
poles on four cars, 6127-6130, which were fitted with 
special high speed equipment and used as Evanston Ex- 
press shopper specials. 

Later, cars 6125 and 6126, now in the Illinois Railway 
Museum, were part of four additional cars also fitted with 



SMEHfe 









• 



■ LsS ?... 

'"ininlln 




Rapid transit car 6125, used in the late actor Steve McQueen's 
last movie, "The Hunter," joins companion car 6126 at Skokie 
Shops. 

trolley poles. Other minor changes were also made to in- 
crease speed. 

Roof boards were removed from the series in the 60's, 
along with the trolley poles, but in September 1979, the roof 
boards reappeared on cars 6123 and 6125, because these 
two vehicles were being used for the filming of the late actor 
Steve McQueen's last motion picture, "The Hunter." 

The veteran actor spent many hours shooting scenes on 
the roof of the two cars with the train speeding along CTA's 
system. eta 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Columbia 
College Chicago 

offers 
spring series of 

photography lectures 



A spring series of photography 
lectures and workshops featuring 
two outstanding photographers 
who are known internationally for 
their exciting and innovative work 
are being offered at Columbia Col- 
lege Chicago through May 10. 

Nathan Lyons and Jack Welpott 
will present lectures on Friday 
nights which are open to the public, 
and will be held in the Ferguson 
Theater at Columbia College, 600 S. 
Michigan Avenue, beginning at 
7:30 p.m.; the fee for the public is 
S5.00 and Columbia students are 
admitted free. No advance registra- 
tion is necessary. Nathan Lyons, 
April 19; Jack Welpott, May 10. 



For further information on Columbia 
College Chicago's photography lecture/ 
workshop series, call (312) 663-1600, 
ext. 320. 



1985 Exhibition 

Highlights 

at 

Cultural Center 



Major exhibitions are being of- 
fered free during 1985 at The 




Chicago Public Library Cultural 
Center, 78 E. Washington Street. 

Over 25 exhibitions will be of- 
fered during the year at the Cultural 
Center by the Chicago Office of 
Fine Arts and The Chicago Public 
Library, many in cooperation with 
other prominent organizations. 

Exhibits are regularly displayed in 
five galleries and represent a wide 
range of media: painting, sculpture, 
photography, graphics, crafts, ar- 
chitecture, and design. The exhibi- 
tions showcase a variety of presen- 
tations, from international and na- 
tional traveling to one-person 
shows by local artists. 

Viewing hours are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mon- 
day through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Friday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. 

Free programs and exhibits in the 
lively and visual arts are offered 
almost daily at the Cultural Center. 
A monthly calendar of events is 
available at the building. Exhibitions 
now offered include: 

Your calendar 
highlights 
are needed 

After Hours will continue to feature 
a long-range calendar of educational 
and cultural events for Transit News 
readers. 

We encourage you to share your 
long range plans with us and make the 
employee publication a one-stop 
shopping tour. We welcome informa- 
tion on your not-for-profit activities, 
from the theater to the museum or 
classroom. 



The Art of Symour Rosofsky This 
long-awaited survey devoted to 
one of the masters of Chicago art 
explores the emotional and pictorial 
breadth of his work from the late 
1950s to his death in 1981. Until 
April 13, Exhibit Hall. 

Gary Justis: Hyperfunctional 
Icons This exhibition features elec- 
trokinetic sculpture by Chicago ar- 
tist Gary Justis, a sculptor who has 
gained national attention for his an- 
thropomorphic sculptures in recent 
years. Until May 25, Randolph 
Gallery. 

New American Paperworks This 
major traveling exhibition of two 
and three-dimensional pieces, in- 
stallations, and environments 
features works by 20 American ar- 
tists who have used paper as an in- 
tegral part of the artwork rather 
than as the traditional recipient sur- 
face. Until July 13, Exhibit Hall. 

Virginio Ferrari: Inside/Outside 

This two-part exhibit features the 
work of internationally-celebrated 
Virginio Ferrari who has made 
Chicago his home for the past 20 
years. Ferrari is primarily noted for 
his large-scale, outdoor abstract 
works in metal. Until Sept 7, Ran- 
dolph Gallery. 

The Black Photographer: An 
American View Over 200 black and 
white and color vintage images 
comprise this major historical over- 
view highlighting the sub- 
stantial contributions of Black 
photographers from all parts of the 
United States, from the 1840s 
through the 1960s. Until October 
12, Exhibit Hall. 

For weekly updated listings of 
events, dial F-l-N-E A-R-T (346-3278). 

eta 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 2 



\Commendation Corneri 




Robert Madison (Beverly 
garage) was complimented by 
Virginia Johnson, of West 
114th Street, for being "a ter- 
rific representative of your 
company" as operator of a 
No. 52A South Kedzie bus. 
"He is observant, knows 
regular riders at each stop, 
and is helpful. Several times 
in one week my (earlier) bus 
broke down. Driver No. 6448 
called in, realizing he had no 
leader, and asked it he could 
start out five minutes early 
and pick us up. I am most 
grateful for his thoughtful- 
ness. His smile, kind words 
and helpful ways go a long 
way in brightening my day 
and those of the many 
passengers riding with him." 



Martin Troglia (Limits garage) was praised by Betsy 
Spears, of Pine Grove Avenue, for his efforts to retrieve her 
billfold from a thief on a No. 146 Marine/Michigan bus. "He 
saw a man pull my billfold from my purse. We were stopped 
at a red light on Michigan and Huron. He yelled a warning 
to me, and then pursued the thief until a policeman in- 
tervened. The driver returned to the bus and handed me the 
billfold. 1 truly believe I had a one-in-a-million person 
witnessing the crime. It would have been easy for him to 
turn his head, ignore the scene, and keep driving. I am ex- 
tremely grateful." 



Lela Townes (77th Street garage) impressed Mildred 
Lynk, of Euclid Avenue, with the way she handled her No. 
6 Jeffery Express bus. "She was courteous, pleasant and 
very helpful. She gave each passenger the directions asked 
of her as though that information was part of her job, and 
not an annoyance to be ignored. I have ridden the buses for 
17 years, and never saw a driver like her. She is to be com- 
mended for her cheerful attitude and helpful manner. She 
also announced each stop soon enough and clearly enough 
to be useful. We need more people like her." 



Guido Barrera (North Park garage) won the admiration 
of Cynthia Bell, who rode his No. 156 LaSalle bus to her job 
on North LaSalle Street. "A pedestrian stepped off the curb 
into the line of the bus. Due to the alertness and quick think- 
ing of the driver, the bus was moved out of the woman's 
path, and she was safe. This was the closest call I have ever 
seen, and I thought the woman was a goner. You are to be 
congratulated for employing a driver of the skill and 
adroitness of No. 7540 in safeguarding pedestrians who 
make the most unpredictable and unsafe decisions while on 
the streets." 



Arlene Hudson (West Section) 
was noticed by Mrs. Henry 
Ulmer, of Elmwood Park, who 
was a rider on her Lake-Dan 
Ryan train early one morning 
leaving the Harlem terminal. 
"The floor of the train was 
completely covered with 
ripped-up newspapers. I have 
never seen anything like it. 
This conductor was very nice. 
She picked up as much paper 
as she had time for between 
train stops and put it in the 
waste baskets on the plat- 
forms. I think she should be 
recognized for her effort to 
clean the train. Besides that, 
she called out every station 
very clearly, and was also 
polite and friendly." 



Charley Lane (Beverly garage) was commended by 
Naomi Gray, of West 99th Street, for "excellent service over 
and above the norm" as operator of a No. 112 Vincen- 
nes/111 bus. "He is one of your best operators. I've been in 
the neighborhood a long time, and whenever I ride his bus, 
he is always the same — courteous and extra considerate of 
the elderly. One of the especially nice things about him is 
that at transfer stops he does not rush off, leaving the people 
who are trying to make their connections. When I hear peo- 
ple say, 'They don't care,' I say, 'Don't say They don't care, 
just say Some don't, never all." 



Adrian Miller (West Section) is doing "an extra special 
job" as agent in the Dearborn subway at Jackson, according 
to David Saulnier, who works on South Wells Street. "In 
one recent rush hour dash home, I submitted a five-dollar 
bill, instead of a single. After he gave me a dime in change, I 
was gone in a flash — before he could count out the four 
singles. I was almost down the stairs when he made a fierce 
racket, finally getting my attention. After all his trouble, he 
even had a sense of humor, like 'my biggest tip of the day, 
but I know this belongs to you.' Only then did I realize my 
mistake. He is a fine gentleman." 



Maria Agnew (Limits garage) was appreciated by Karen 
Curry, of North Wells Street, for the way she handled a No. 
156 LaSalle bus. "In the 10 years that I have been a daily 
CTA passenger, she was the most pleasant driver and cer- 
tainly one of the most skillful 1 have ridden with. Street traffic 
was very heavy, and the blowing snow made traveling 
treacherous. The driver pulled the bus to the curb at each 
stop and waited until the old/infirm passengers were seated 
before pulling away. She clearly called out the stops. She 
drove defensively and with great skill. It was a pleasure 
traveling with her." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Two rapid transit 
crews get 

DAY IN CTA 
HONORS 



Bus controller James Stephen explains ► 
how service is monitored from his console 
to Day in CTA honorees touring the con- 
trol center. They are (from left) rail con- 
ductors Allan McFall and Russell 
Williams, and motormen Ronald Cosley 
and Lena Jones. 



When the trolley shoes of a rapid transit car on a six-car 
North-South train caught fire at Fullerton avenue, motor- 
man Ronald Cosley and conductor Allan McFall responded 
immediately by having the power cut and a supervisor sent 
to the scene. 

Later the trolley shoes were secured, fuses were cut and 
the defective car was cut out. The crew thus avoided more 
serious problems which could have resulted if the trolley 
shoes had grounded. 

Both crewmen were honored on "A Day in CTA" for their 
quick response to the situation. Similar honors were accord- 
ed motorman Lena Jones and conductor Russell Williams of 




Howard Street terminal for their quick response to another 
emergency situation on the North-South rapid transit route. 

Their train was northbound at Indiana when it went into 
emergency. After checking the train, it was discovered that 
the permanent coupling between the fifth and sixth cars was 
broken. 

Ms Jones and Williams unloaded the passengers from 
their defective train onto a southbound train by using gang 
planks. 

The crew received special recognition for its teamwork 
and the safe evacuation of their riders which averted injuries 
and equipment damage. eta 



TWUfor a job WELL DONE! 



Employees who have received commendations from the public 



Samuel Adams Jr., North Park 
Lavan Anderson, Kedzie 

Adrien Bazile. Beverly 
Saul Bozeman, Ashland 
Deborah Brown. Kedzie 
James Burris, Kedzie 

Jean Cage. North Park 
Jose Canales, Limits 
Eric Carney. 69th Street 
Jesse Chin, North Park 
Maggie Chitto. North Park 
Walter Christian, Archer 
Felicia Clower. Limits 
David Copeland. Kedzie 
Mary Crenshaw, North Park 
David Curley. North Rail Dist 

Clarence Davis, 77th Street 
Minnie Davis. North Avenue 
Thomas Davis, Special Services 



Albert Dayan, North Park 
Janice Douglas, 69th Street 
Herman DuHin, Forest Glen 
Theonia Dunn, Archer 

William Edgerton, Limits 

Eddie Figueroa, North Park 
Hubert Fincher, North Park 
William Fletcher Jr., Howard/Kir 
Lester Franklin, North Avenue 

Luis Guilamo, Howard Kimball 

Donald Heard, Howard /Kimball 
Annie Hill. 77th Street 
Ralph Home. 69th Street 

Tery Jackson, 77th Street 
Edgar Jeffrey, Forest Glen 
Sandra Johnson. 69th Street 



John Koldan, North Section 
James Kolstad, Beverly 

John Lemond, North Park 
Dominic Lochirco. Archer 

Geru Martin. Forest Park 
Felix Matias. Archer 
Andrew McDaniel, Beverly 
ball James Melton. North Park 
Earl Miles. Kedzie 
Eugene Motyka. Jefferson Park 

Stephen Nance, Archer 
James Nelson. North Park 
Harold Nelson Jr., Howard /Kimball 
Victoria Nesbit. North Park 

Ferdinand Ortiz, North Park 

Eduardo Pescatore. Forest Glen 



Ruben Quiles, Jefferson Park 

Kenneth Richards. Limits 

Donald Seay. Howard Kimball 
Harold Stlngley Jr., Jefferson Park 
Carl Suddeth. North Park 

Wendell Talbert. North Park 
Vinente Tamayo. North Avenue 
Richard Thomas Jr., North Avenue 

Joe Viel. North Avenue 

William Walls. Limns 

Amos Williams Jr., North Section 

Andrew Wilson. Archer 

Fred Young. North Park 
Charles Young. Jefferson Park 

Joseph Zukerman. North Park 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 2 




103BDSTON1 






Vjonstruction has begun on the 
103rd Street and Stony Island bus 
garage, with completion expected in 
spring, 1987. 

As the second new bus facility to be 
built by CTA in more than 30 years, 
103rd Street will be a model of high 
technology and efficiency, featuring 
many of the design innovations first 
used in the new Kedzie garage, which 
was dedicated in June, 1984. This 
multi-million dollar structure will have 
large indoor bus parking, servicing, 
and maintenance facilities. Up to 300 
buses will escape the weather, saving 
hundreds of thousands of dollars in 
diesel fuel and engine wear and tear, 
and increasing overall bus life. 

Since heat loss through open garage 
doors has always been a problem, the 
consultant has designed a common 
bus entry /exit area. This smaller area 
has a lower ceiling, thus trapping 
warmer air in the taller structure of the 
main garage behind the bus entry/exit 
location. 

In addition, the garage complex in- 
cludes a 100,000-gallon underground 
diesel fuel storage capacity, bus 
washers, and storage facilities for bulk 
deliveries of lubricants, anti-freeze, 
and soaps. An automatic delivery 
system distributes these materials 
directly to maintenance work stations. 
CTA Project Manager F. H. Petzold 
stated that the facility was designed by 
Baker Engineering, Inc., Chicago of- 
fice, and the general contractor is 
Klein Construction Company of West- 
mont. Funding for the $25.6 million 
project has been provided by the state 
and federal governments. Cta 




Specialized equipment is used when drilling for one 
caissons that will form the subgrade foundation for 
structure. 



of the 246 
the garage 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



ISLAND GARAGE 




View shows part of a completed grade beam at the main bus 
entry/exit location. Grade beams are framed into the caissons 
and the completed structure supports the exterior brick walls. 




Workers install reinforcing steel and 
forms for concrete grade beams along 
east wall, looking north. 



South wall shows more progress on grade 
beams after concrete has been poured 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 2 



graduations in operations 



CTA Operations Division is adding 
52 more potential management team 
members from within its ranks. 

Certificates of training were award- 
ed February 11 to 18 selected 
management personnel at the first 
graduation ceremony of 1985 which 
was held in the CTA Board room at 
the Merchandise Mart. 

The class included five assistant 
superintendent of instruction trainees, 
and 13 candidates for superintendent 
of bus and rail personnel. Other can- 
didates are presently in training as 
superintendents for bus, rail, and 
agent service. 

The newly selected management 
team candidates, with an average of 
20 years CTA service, will fill manage- 
ment positions from a pool of new 
management people as vacancies oc- 
cur by attrition, as announced by 
Harry Reddrick, deputy executive 
director. Operations. 

The first three weeks of the eight to 
eleven-week training program in- 
troduces candidates to management 



Operations 
graduates 

first 

1985 

management 

trainees 



theory, skills and orientation. This 
phase of training runs the gamut of 
theory from duties and responsibilities 
to leadership and problem solving. 

The formal training is enhanced 
with independent projects, ap- 
pearances of guest lecturers from 
various CTA departments, video 
taped presentations and role playing 
exercises. 

The formal training is followed by 



six to eight weeks of field training in 
which the management candidates 
receive on-the-job training in their 
selected areas of speciality. 

Performances are evaluated and 
candidates are ranked and assigned as 
substitutes as temporary vacancies oc- 
cur. Permanent assignments are also 
based upon periodic performance 
ratings, according to Training/Instruc- 
tion personnel. 

Recent graduates of the manage- 
ment development training were 
Assistant Superintendent, Instruction 
trainees: Arthur Bennett, Wilson Hart, 
Charles Hodges, Harvey Jones, and 
John Perkins. 

Superintendent for Personnel 
graduates were: John Andrews, Jessie 
Burns, McRayfield Caldwell, Joyce 
Bell, Frank Jones, Daryl Lampkins. 
Luster Morton and Leonard Perry. 
Others were: Milton Rolland, Fred 
Schein, Fred Williams, Jerry Williams, 
Walter Young, and James Burns, 
Operations Administrative Services 
department. Cta 



Assistant superintendents for Instruction 
earning certificates of training in the first 
class of 1985 are (from left) John Perkins, 




Charles Hodges, Harvey Jones, Arthur 
Bennett, and Wilson Hart. 




Candidates for bus and rail personnel superintendents receiving certiticates are (seated) Jessie Burns, McRayfield Caldwell, Joyce Bell, and Milton Rolland. Standing 
are Jerry Williams, John Andrews, Fred Schein, Leonard Perry, Walter C. Young, Frank Jones, Daryl Lampkins. and Fred Williams. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Ernestine Flient 
elected PMI 
vice president 

Ernestine Flient. a Capital Develop- 
ment project controller, was elected 
vice president of the Midwest chapter 
of the Project Management Institute. 

Ms Flient, a member of PMI since 
1983, joined CTA in 1979. She holds 
a B.A. degree in finance, and is a 
member of the American Association 
of Cost Engineers, an affiliate 
organization of PMI. 

The Project Management Institute is 
a national organization for the profes- 
sional development of project 
managers and controllers. The 
Midwest chapter meets monthly, alter- 
nating between Chicago and 
Milwaukee. 

PMI hosts an annual seminar/sym- 
posium and encourages its members 
to publish papers in the PM Journal on 
subjects of particular interest to the in- 
stitute. 

The organization also recognizes its 
members who make significant and 
continued contributions to the institute 
and promote professionalism. The 
awards are presented each year during 
the annual seminar/symposium. 

Ms Flient said PMI is striving for the 
establishment of a certification pro- 
gram comparable to the method now 
used for certified public accountants. 
PMI is also working to establish basic 
concepts for project managers and 
controllers, particularly in the areas of 
concept approach, target dates, and 
budget. eta 



Veterans to receive 
insurance dividends 



More than 168,000 Illinois veterans 
who kept their GI life insurance in 
force will share a record $39 million in 
dividends in 1985, the Veterans Ad- 
ministration announced. 

No application for the annual divi- 
dend is necessary, according to Grady 
Horton, director of the VA Regional 
Office in Chicago. He said each 
policyholder will receive the dividend 
automatically in the month of the an- 
niversary date of the policy. 

Horton said the record high divi- 
dend was due to high interest earnings 
on the insurance funds' investments 
and lower death rates among 
policyholders. 

There are 2,191 World War I 
veterans in Illinois with current 
policies. The average amount to be 



paid to these policyholders nationwide 
is $248. A total 138,577 World War II 
veterans in the state will receive an 
average payment of $241. Korean 
conflict policyholders-22,888 in 
Illinois-- will receive an average pay- 
ment of $187. 

Disabled veterans from World War 
II and Korea who have a special type 
of GI insurance (Veterans Reopened 
Insurance) will also receive increased 
dividends. This year 4,628 Illinois 
policyholders will receive dividends 
which average $203. Vietnam-era and 
post-Vietnam era veterans, who have 
different insurance programs, do not 
receive dividends. 

Horton said the state's dividend 
payout is part of a national record 
$798.8 million in 1985 dividens to 3.4 
million veterans. 



White River, Norfolk Lake great for trout fishing 




Lars Pearson, who retired as day foreman 
at Lawndale garage, displays an 18-pound 
striper which took a prize in a fisherman's 
contest at Mountain Home, Arkansas, 
where Pearson now lives. The former 
Lawndale foreman, and CTA pensioner 
William Miedema, who lives in Chicago, 
enjoy fishing Mountain Home waters 
together year-round. 



Fishing is good throughout the year 
in Mountain Home, Arkansas, report 
pensioners Bill Miedema, and Lars 
Pearson. 

Miedema. formerly of North 
Avenue garage, and Pearson, who 
retired as foreman at Lawndale, say 
that although spring and summer is 
very good for trout fishing, the 
weather is just as accommodating in 



November, and fish bite just as 
regularly in the spring, summer, or 
winter. 

CTA fishermen planning to vacation 
in the south and test the waters of 
Mountain Home, may want to dip 
their lines into the White River, Nor- 
folk Lake, or Bull Shoals Dam, waters 
which Miedema says are the best 
places in the area for any angler. 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 2 



11 




LaNITA MONTGOMERY, daughter 
of Barbara Montgomery, Revenue Ac- 
counting, was graduated December 
22, 1984 with a bachelor of arts 
degree in sociology from Western Il- 
linois University. 




m$b\ 




Our first INSIDE NEWS col- 
umn appeared last month. We 
are bringing INSIDE NEWS 
back in its traditional format 
of short news items from 
work locations, with photos 
when available, but we need 
news from work locations and 
reporters to relay the news to 
us. If you would like to 
volunteer to be an INSIDE 
NEWS reporter, please phone 
Rick Willis, Ext. 3324, or Jack 
Sowchin, Ext. 3320, in the 
Mart. 




If you think you've seen this face 
before perhaps you have. He's five- 
year old Phillip James Williams, a 
child model whose likeness appears 
on Marshall Fields, Sears Roebuck, 
and Montgomery Ward advertise- 
ments. His modeling career which 
began a year ago, also includes tele- 
vision commercials from cookies to 
toothpaste. Phillip is the son of north- 
siders, Mr. and Mrs. James Williams. 
His father is a bus servicer assigned to 
North Avenue garage. 




Sales coordinator's son 
may have future in baseball 



American Legion Baseball Commissioner 
Leroy Leister presents the Most Valuable 
Player plaque to pitcher Steven Culkar of 
the Mt. Prospect American Legion Post 
525 team. Culkar is a sophomore at 
Harper College where he majors in broad- 
cast journalism. 



At the rate he's hurling the ball these 
days, 19-year old Steven Culkar is apt 
to have a very lucrative major league 
baseball career ahead of him. 

The six-foot, 175-pound Harper 
College sophomore, who says he 
wants to be a broadcast journalist, is 
the son of CTA sales coordinator 
Thorn Culkar of Des Plaines. 

The young pitcher's affinity for 
baseball developed when he was a lit- 
tle leaguer. His talent as a pitcher pro- 
gressed through the Boys League, and 
on to Forest View High School in Arl- 
ington Heights where he graduated in 
1983. His immediate goal is to be "the 
best pitcher on the Harper campus." 

Last summer, Culkar's Mt. Prospect 
American Legion Post 525 baseball 
team won the Cook County Tourna- 
ment, the State tourney, and was 
runner-up in the Great Lakes Regional 
Tournament at Rockport, Indiana. 
The sweep of victories in the Cook 
County Tournament was in no small 
measure to the credit of young Culkar. 
whose performance included a win 
and three saves. 

In the State contest, Culkar finished 



1-1 and fanned five hitters in succes- 
sion to end the championship game. 
The American Legion named him its 
most valuable player for 1984. He was 
also recipient of the Cook County 
Tournament Pitching award. 

Still more honors are planned for 
the young pitcher; the Chicago Old 
Timers are set to give him special 
recognition at their spring banquet for 
being selected MVP for Division I. 
Culkar will be in the company of the 
1984 Chicago Cubs who will also be 
feted at the Old Timers banquet. 

During the regular 1984 season, 
Culkar made 22 appearances on the 
mound and completed six games for 
Mt. Prospect. He had 11 saves, nine 
wins, and six losses in 93-1/3 innings. 

He tallied 111 strikeouts, had only 
49 walks, and recorded a 2.25 earned 
run average. Culkar helped his own 
cause at the plate with a .410 batting 
average. 

American Legion baseball has had 
the strong support of organized 
baseball for many years, and has long 
received the special attention of both 
professional and college scouts. 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



New Pensioners 



FRED BADKE, Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp. 3-27-58 
DANIEL BORE, Switchman. 

West Section, Emp. 7-12-49 
DONALD BURTON, Claim Rep.. 

Law/Claims. Emp. 12-23-57 
WILLIAM CECICH, Serv. Trk. Chauf., 

West Shops, Emp. 11-24-47 
PAUL CHRISTINO, Adm. Aide, 

Executive, Emp. 1-22-47 
MICHAEL CONNOLLY, Machinist, 

Skokie Shop, Emp. 8-14-50 
ROBERT DARROW, Bus Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 8-29-57 
CHRISTINE EVANS, Ticket Agent. 

95th Street, Emp. 12-15-56 
CHARLES JAMES, Bus Operator, 

69th Street, Emp. 10-12-59 
L. B. JEFFRIES, Rail Janitor, 

Madison/Wabash, Emp. 1-20-70 
DONALD KARL. Clerk, 

Beverly, Emp. 1-16-46 
WALTER KINNISH, Chief Clerk, 

Kedzie, Emp 1-24-49 
THOMAS LeNOIR Jr.. Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 1-3-49 
VIOLA MEYER. Payroll Ctk II. 

Revenue Acctg., Emp. 10-26-55 
JAMES MOONE. Bus Repairer. 

Archer, Emp. 1-16-42 
JOHN MORNAR, Money Handler I, 

Central Counting, Emp. 1-22-46 
CHARLES MYERS, Term. Asst Foreman, 

Desplaines Shop, Emp. 3-20-50 
VITO PALUMBO, Steamfitter, 

West Shops, Emp. 5-29-46 
WILLIAM PARNUM. Superintendent, 

North Park, Emp. 8-14-46 
FRANK PONZIO, Traffic Checker, 

Schedules, Emp. 8-4-47 
WILLIE SCOTT, Supervisor, 

Schedules, Emp 10-2-51 
JOHN SMITH, Bus Operator. 

North Park, Emp. 2-16-61 
ROBERT SUTA, Superintendent, 

O'Hare Terminal, Emp. 1-3-50 
SAM THOMAS, Bus Operator, 

Washington, Emp 2-20-56 
RONALD VOLLAND. Painter Foreman, 

West Shops. Emp. 11-10-59 
ALBERT WILLIAMS. Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 11-23-56 
DORIS YOST. Payroll Clerk II, 

Payroll Acctg , Emp. 4-16-56 
FRED ZIMMERMAN, Supervisor, 

North District, Emp. 1-4-50 



Disability Retirements 



JAMES JACKSON Jr., Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp 5-9-50 
GORDON VAN NORMAN, Car Servicer. 

Kimball, Emp. 5-13-69 



IJNT JVEE^EOR.I^.JVi: 



MARTIN ANDERSEN, 89. 77th Street, 

Emp. 3-14-17, Died 12-8-84 
HARRY BONESS. 75, Claim, 

Emp. 1-6-26, Died 12-15-84 
CLARENCE BRIEGER. 77. West Section, 

Emp 5-1-26, Died 12-5-84 
DANIEL BRODIE Jr., 66, Wilson Shop. 

Emp 3-5-47. Died 1-3-85 
JAMES BURNS. 83, Engineering, 

Emp. 12-20-43. Died 12-4-84 
CARMINE CARDAMONE. 79. Stores, 

Emp. 8-22-39. Died 12-15-84 
EDWARD CARROLL. 83. North Avenue, 

Emp. 1-17-25, Died 8-14-84 
RAYMOND CORBEL, 64, Compt. /Acctg., 

Emp. 8-5-41, Died 12-22-84 
LEO FORTIER, 84, Electrical. 

Emp. 4-12-20, Died 12-6-84 
MARSHALL FOSTER, 77, Engineering. 

Emp 7-15-37, Died 12-18-84 
ROE GUDMOND, 79, 61st Street, 

Emp. 1-15-46, Died 12-19-84 
JOSEPH HEENEY, 88. West Shops, 

Emp. 8-19-29, Died 11-22-84 
JOHN HEIN, 76, North Park, 

Emp. 5-8-41, Died 12-3-84 
CLAUDE HUGHES, 81, North Park, 

Emp. 1-24-29, Died 11-24-84 
HARRY JOHNSON, 76, 77th Street, 

Emp. 7-15-37, Died 12-13-84 



GEORGE LUENBERGER. 63, Limits, 

Emp 7-28-53. Died 12-9-84 
EDWARD MANNION. 74. North Avenue. 

Emp 11-29-43. Died 12 1 84 
ANTHONY McGOWAN. 89. North Section. 

Emp. 2-26-17. Died 12-11-84 
RUDOLPH MISEK, 70. Kedzie. 

Emp 5-1 46, Died 12-28-84 
PATRICK MULLANEY, 82. Beverly, 

Emp 7-2-36, Died 12-23-84 
CHRIST PANTOS. 66, Forest Glen. 

Emp. 5-21-46. Died 12-5-84 
JOSEPH PFLUM, 84, Forest Glen. 

Emp. 3-4-24, Died 12-22-84 
AUGUST SanFlLLIPPO, 56, Forest Glen. 

Emp 3-2-54. Died 12-8-84 
ANNA SCHLEITER, 88. Engineering. 

Emp 10-25-43. Died 12-18-84 
WILLIAM SLADKY, 71. Maintenance, 

Emp. 11-28-45. Died 12-7-84 
FRANK TADIN. 62, Plant Maintenance. 

Emp 9-2-41, Died 12-3-84 
HERBERT UEDELHOFEN, 64. District D. 

Emp 11-17-60, Died 12-31-84 
RAYMOND WALSH, 75, District A. 

Emp. 6-12-41, Died 12-11-84 
ELIZABETH WEST. 86. Congress. 

Emp. 9-20-43, Died 12-14-84 
THOMAS WHITE. 86, South Section. 

Emp. 2-13-23, Died 11-29-84 



■ 




■ ■ 


service 


anniversaries 




40 Years 




30 Years 




Herman Goldman, Forest Glen 




George Booker, Comm/Power Control 




William Ruddle, North Avenue 




Booker Byers. 77th Street 




Richard Schneider, Bus Maint 




Samuel Clark Jr.. 69th Street 




William Taylor, Comm/Power Control 


James Dentley, 77th Street 








Vincent Ecter, 77th Street 








Magnus Edgar Jr.. North Park 
William Harris. District C 
Richard Lane, Bus Instruction 










Timothy Mulvey, Beverly 






Irene Peterson, Research & Spec Proj. 






Henry Sams, Limits 


35 Years 




Donald Schaffer, Forest Glen 
Raphael Wilson, 77th Street 


James Allen, Douglas/Congress 




25 Years 


Robert Crawford, Forest Park 




Americo DiGlanfillippo, Wilson Shop 




Willie Green, Bus Relief Area 




Frank Bailey, 77th Street 


Burton Hill, Gen'l Maint. 




Richard Brown. 77th Street 


Andrew Karkoska, Beverly 




Joseph Browne, Genl Maint 


Robert Lorentz, North Park 




John Gorman, North Rail Dist 


Robert Loughran, Comm/Power Control 


Joseph Hartl. Comm Design 


Langley Lykins, Rail Service 




Thomas Mortell, Douglas/Congress 


George Millonas, Equipment Engr /Maint 


Donald Prendergast, Truck Shop 


Duane Reed Jr., Substation Maint 




Wade Simmons, North Avenue 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 2 



13 



RETIREMENTS 




o 



Parrillo retires 

A good time was had by all as evident 
by this trio celebrating the retirement 
of Nello Parrillo (center), car servicer 
at Desplaines terminal. Others enjoy- 
ing the festive occasion are Joseph 
LaBellarte (left), day foreman at 
Desplaines, and Leonard Davenport, 
unit supervisor, Desplaines. The 
observance was held at the VFW hall 
on Ogden for Parrillo who joined CTA 
January 12, 1957, and retired 
January 1 after 28 years of service. 





Ends 41 years 



Members of the Phillips family joined 
their brother, mail clerk Johnny 
Phillips, on the occasion of his retire- 
ment after 41 years of loyal CTA ser- 
vice. An open house in Phillips' honor 
was held December 27 in the mail 
room at the Merchandise Mart. Pre- 
sent for the event were (from left): 
Mrs. Nancy Carmody, Tom Phillips, 
Mrs. Marge Murphy, Mrs. Sharon 
Rich, the honoree's niece: brother-in- 
law Vince Murphy, and grand- 
nephews, Steve Rich, 5; and Kevin 
Rich, 10. Roger Wood, manager. 
Management Services, noting that the 
veteran mail clerk is sure to be missed, 
said, "Johnny was always here, and 
on time. If he was not here by 6:30 to 
get the mail down to the dock, you 
could be sure something was wrong. 
He loved his job." Numerous friends 
stopped by the mail room to bid the 
friendly mail clerk a fond farewell, and 
to extend best wishes for a happy 
retirement. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Paul J. Kole 

Deputy Executive Director, 
Finance (Retired) 



Paul J. Kole, former deputy 
executive director, Finance, died 
suddenly on March 6. At the 
time of his death, Mr. Kole was 
a financial consultant to the 
CTA's pension fund. On 
February 1, Mr. Kole retired 
from CTA, closing a 29-year 
career in financial services which 
began with the City of Chicago 
in 1956. 

Mr. Kole is survived by his 
widow, Claire, and five 
children, and was a resident of 
West Rogers Park. 

The last 13 years of Mr. 
Kole's brilliant career were spent 
with CTA as the general opera- 
tions officer of the Authority's 
financial matters. He was 
named deputy executive direc- 
tor, Finance, in 1984. His CTA 
service included every facet of 
directing the efforts of depart- 
ments performing financial 
functions from accounting and 
internal auditing to budgeting, 
and insurance and pensions. The 
financial well-being of the CTA 
pension fund, and its excellent 
return on investments, are large- 



ly a result of Mr. Kole's finan- 
cial expertise. 

Previously, Mr. Kole was 
director of Data Processing, 
Mayor's Datacenter, and was 
later named first deputy comp- 
troller, City Comptroller's Of- 
fice. 

Mr. Kole was a graduate of 
Roosevelt University with a 
bachelor of science in commerce 
degree and a master's degree in 
business administration, a Cer- 
tified Public Accountant, and 
treasurer and chairman of the 
Budget and Finance Committee 
for the Chicago Heart Associa- 
tion. In 1976 he was the reci- 
pient of Chicago Governments' 
Public Service Award, Executive 
Category. 

On the occasion of Mr. Kole's 
retirement, CTA Executive 
Director Bernard J. Ford ex- 
pressed CTA's appreciation for 
Mr. Kole's dedicated service: 
"In my estimation, there has 
been no better financial 
manager in the entire transit in- 
dustry than you have been over 
the last thirteen years. CTA was 





indeed fortunate when you 
decided to cast your lot with us 
after leaving the city. I, per- 
sonally, have felt fortunate to 
have your advice, your friend- 
ship and, I hope, your con- 
fidence." 



RETIREMENTS 




Charles Brown, bus servicer at Kedzie 
garage, signs off on a bus after check- 
ing it over for the last time in his 
37-year career. Brown who began his 
employment with the Chicago Surface 
Lines November 5. 1948, retired 
January 1. The majority of his CTA 
service was spent at Kedzie garage. 
Brown's co-workers, joined by day 
foreman Bill Toomey and other super- 
visory personnel, presented the 
veteran bus servicer with a plaque and 
a gold watch on December 31 in 
recognition of his years of loyal ser- 
vice. Coffee and rolls were served. 
Brown is an ordained minister of the 
gospel and plans to spend his retire- 
ment serving the ministry full-time. 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 2 



15 




1 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 
Volume38 Number2 

Published for employees and retirees of CTA. 
Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Depart- 
ment, Bill Baxa, Manager. 

Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin 
Editor: Rick Willis 
Graphic Designers: Alexandra Eiva, Al Grady 
Contributing Writers: Robert A. Gaines, 
Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 
Typesetting and printing provided by the Manage- 
ment Services Department 

Distributed free of charge to all active and retired 
CTA employees. Annual subscription price to 
others. $5 CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Mer- 
chandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555. Chicago, 
Illinois 60654. 



wa 



;.w 






CTA Public Affairs and Operations Plan- 
ning departments celebrated Valentine's 
Day by issuing the first all-new CTA Map in 
more than 15 years. 

The new map is printed in full color and 
features easy-to-read graphics, a new table 
of service hours and frequency for all bus 
routes, simplified route descriptions, and 
additional information about suburban ser- 
vices, travel information, customer 
assistance. Culture Bus, and other CTA 
services. 

Free maps are available at bus garages, 
rapid transit terminals and ticket agent 
booths, Chicago Public Library branches, 
CTA General Office (7th floor. Merchan- 
dise Mart), RTA Consumer Affairs (1st 
floor, Marina City), Richard J. Daley Civic 
Center. Water Tower Visitor Information 
Center and other locations. Riders who 
would like to receive a free map through 
the mail may phone 836-7000 or 
836-4047. 

Previous maps, issued approximately 
every six months, were updated versions 
of a CTA map developed during the late 
1960's. 




•». it' 













C&4 



.V-.v- •>-:■•■■■. ■■^•■■-Jl 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555. Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT NO. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



33 




i3 Transit News 



Vol.38, No. 3, 1985/ ForNZhicago Transit Authority, Employees and Retirees 




Line Instructor William Spencer 
operates the first bus with an electronic 
farebox installed for testing. 





hen does a "beep" mean 
"thank you?" Answer: when the cor- 
rect fare is recorded by CTA's new 
electronic farebox. And this should 
be music to our ears, since our new 
farebox will help both our passengers 
and our operators. The most obvious 
and helpful feature is that the new 
farebox will accept DOLLAR BILLS. 
It will also accept coins and keep 
them separated during the entire 
revenue handling process. 

Although the new farebox still re- 
quires the exact fare to be deposited, 
it provides an easy and convenient 
means for passengers to pay their 
fares, and makes it easier for 
operators to collect the correct fares. 
Operators will see a digital read-out 
of the amount of money deposited 
and will see the dollar bill and coins 
displayed in an easy-to-check posi- 
tion. Passengers and operators will 
hear a "beep" to indicate that the 
correct fare has been paid and to 
signify a "thank you." 

All money is registered and 
counted within the farebox's elec- 
tronic computing system. This helps 
CTA's accounting and auditing pro- 
cess. And, since dollar bills are kept 
separated from coins throughout the 
entire revenue process, we save time 



Dollar bills are inserted on the rider's right (operator's left) and coin 
right). Bills and coins remain separated throughout the entire fare 

and money during the central coun- 
ting function. 

Additional benefits for CTA and its 
riders are derived from the data col- 
lection capabilities which give us 
limited breakdowns of ridership and 
allow for the electronic transfer of all 
farebox-related data to a central 




A specially-selected team of dedicated 
CTA employees cooperated under the 
direction of project manager Dale 
Mangelsdorff (above) to develop CTA's 
electronic farebox program. All were ex- 
perts on the subject of fare collection and 
fareboxes, and some had been the most 
servere critics of earlier versions of the 
dollar bill accepting farebox. 



s are inserted on the rider's left (operator's 
collection and money counting process. 

computer system. The end result is a 
more convenient means for passen- 
gers to ride CTA and an easier 
system for our operators. 

A campaign to introduce the 
registering farebox began during 
March, when Community Relations 
staff members began mailing 
"Where's the Beep?" electronic 
farebox flyers to community groups 
in the Beverly Garage service area. 
Staff members also have made 
presentations at community 
meetings. 

Bus operators began passing out 
flyers during the week of March 21, 
and on March 25, all Beverly buses 
were equipped with the new 
fareboxes and displayed "Here's the 
Beep" window cards. 

The window cards and the flyers 
give the public easy-to-follow hints 
on how to use the new farebox and 
explain how the new farebox benefits 
the public and allows CTA to provide 
improved service. 

After the 60-day Beverly test, the 
farebox will be evaluated, and if it 
performs as well as it did during the 
earlier test, the farebox system will be 
installed system-wide on a garage-by- 
garage basis until the process is com- 
pleted in the spring of 1986. — eta 



Transit News is published for employees and retirees of CTA • Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Department, Bill 
Baxa, Manager • Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin; Editor: Rick Willis • Graphic Designers: A. V. Eiva and Alan Grady • 
Contributing Writers: Terry Hocin, Jeff Stern, Don Yabush • Typesetting and printing provided by the Management Services 
Department • Distributed free of charge to all active and retired CTA employees • Annual subscription price to others, $5 • 
CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Merchandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, IL 60654. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



□ 



EROISM 




CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli presents a Certificate of Merit from the City of Berwyn 
and a CTA Special Recognition Certificate to bus operator Egnechles Brown. Cardilli 
commented, "CTA really appreciates the heroic act that Mr. Brown performed. It 
represents what CTA employees are all about — helping people and serving people." 

All in a day's work for Egnechles Brown 



At 5:15 a.m. on January 9, 
Egnechles Brown, a 17-year veteran 
CTA bus operator from Kedzie 
garage, was making his first eastbound 
run from North Riverside shopping 
center on the *25 West Cermak bus 
route. As he approached a burning 
building at 6845-47 W. Cermak, in 
Berwyn, Brown parked his bus and 
reported the fire by radio to the Con- 
trol Center. 

The business on the first floor of the 
building was closed at that early hour, 
but Brown feared that the occupants 
of the second floor apartments were in 
grave danger. 

When Brown and one of his 
passengers had received no response 
after knocking on the street-level en- 
trance to the apartments, they kicked 



the door down and ran upstairs to alert 
the residents. One of the two apart- 
ments was vacant, but, as the fire 
raged across the hall, they told an 
elderly gentleman in the other apart- 
ment to leave the building. The man's 
wife was immobilized by a cast on her 
leg, so Brown and his passenger car- 
ried the woman to safety. As the fire 
spread, Brown realized that their quick 
action saved the lives of the elderly 
couple. 

Commenting on concern for his 
own safety, Brown said: "I didn't even 
think about it. There was no time. 
Something needed to be done, and I 
did it. After the people were safe and 
the fire department and police were 
there, I just continued on my run." 



From the Chairman 



Successful 
program 
gains support 



One of the most successful and 
worthwhile CTA public service adver- 
tising programs has been the search 
for missing children. During the first 
two months of the program, 
photographs of eight missing children 
were displayed in our buses and trains, 
and three of the children have been 
located. The Chicago Police reported 
that the return of the third missing 
child was a direct result of our advertis- 
ing program. Citizens who reported 
the child's general whereabouts to the 
police had first seen the child's 
photograph on CTA car card advertis- 
ing. 

This documented success of the 
program has yielded another impor- 
tant benefit. The J. C. Penney Com- 
pany has generously offered to pay 
for the third and fourth printings of 
Lost Children Car Cards. We applaud 
J. C. Penney for coming forward and 
demonstrating concern for the needs 
of the public. Because we appreciate 
any and all assistance offered by the 
commercial sector, we have also 
begun working with the Chicago 
Association of Commerce and In- 
dustry, and we hope to gain additional 
support from their other member 
organizations. 

As CTA employees, you can help 
through on-the-job vigilance. Study 
the photographs of the lost children 
displayed on our vehicles and 
elsewhere, and observe the children 
who ride our vehicles. Runaways and 
lost children often turn to transit as a 
low-cost means of transportation. 

The early success and growth of 
support for the Lost Children Car 
Card Program demonstrates that 
government, business, and individuals 
can work together to solve serious prob- 
lems affecting our society. 



~-JLX£j 




1985 Vol. 38 — No. 3 




Materials Management 
hosts 60 AMMS guests 




James Whittley (left), supervisor, Stores West, guides a group of AMMS visitors through the racking area of Skokie Warehouse, CTA's 
newest warehousing facility, where materials are stored in wire baskets or on wooden pallets as high as 26 feet above the floor level. 



Oixty members of the American Materials Manage- 
ment Society (AMMS) toured CTA's Skokie complex on 
January 15. The tour was hosted by Bill Roman, director. 
Stores, and Mike Yedinak, material handling specialist. 
Yedinak and Chuck Ripke, special projects analyst who 
coordinated the tour, are AMMS members. 

The AMMS is a professional society dedicated to pro- 
viding for the exchange of ideas and information relating 
to materials management, material handling, storage, pro- 
duction and inventory control. The society arranges about 
a dozen visits a year to materials facilities, mainly in the 
metropolitan Chicago area. 

The CTA tour began at the Morton House restaurant in 
Morton Grove, where participants representing over 30 
industries watched CTA's multimedia historic presentation, 
"Once Upon a Timetable." They also were given a slide 
tour of the Materials Management Department, covering 
its organization, responsibilities, relationship to other 
departments, and a brief overview of all Stores facilities. 

Then it was a short ride on a new Flyer bus to the 
Skokie complex, where the visitors were divided into six 
groups to make it easier to move about and ask ques- 
tions. A warehouse supervisor and a shop supervisor ac- 
companied each group to explain the functions and 




Ron Glaser (right), superintendent, Quality Assurance, illustrates 
the importance of metallurgically inspecting a washer used under 
the head of a traction motor to visitors in the metrology lab at 
Skokie's Storeroom 42. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Jim Zazula, (second from left), supervisor, Skokie Warehouse, 
shows AMMS visitors through Skokie Shops. In the foreground, 
electrical motor parts on a cart in the repair area await installa- 
tion of new component parts. 



operations of the areas visited. 

Of particular interest was Storeroom 42, CTA's newest 
warehouse facility. Opened in 1980, it has a 26-foot-high 
clear storage area with narrow-aisle, wire-guided material 
handling equipment that permits the storage of all 19,630 
different rapid transit train parts under one roof. From 
here the parts are distributed to all rail terminals as well as 
Skokie Shop. 

After the 2-hour tour, participants boarded the bus and 
returned to Morton House for a technical session . There 
Frank Venezia, director. Rail Maintenance, Bill Roman 
and Mike Yedinak answered questions about CTA's 
maintenance and supply operations. 

The CTA tour was different from those previously ex- 
perienced by AMMS members because every CTA activity 
is aimed at providing a service, rather than simply making 
available a supply of goods. 

Both AMMS participants and their CTA hosts felt the 
tour was helpful in detailing the materials handling opera- 
tions of a major service-oriented organization. Among the 
comments heard from visitors were: "... a very in- 
teresting and informative tour". . ."changed my perspec- 
tive of the CTA". . . and "All your riders should know 
what it takes to provide service." 



Motorman's son elected 
Boy Scout governor 




Eagle Scout Eric Jones, 18, pauses with Governor James R. 
Thompson in the governor's Springfield office. Scouts elected the 
youth Boy Scout Governor for the 25th anniversary of Eagle Scout 
Citizenship Day, which coincided with the observance of Black 
History Month and Boy Scout Week. 

Thirty-two Illinois Eagle scouts, selected for their extraor- 
dinary troop leadership, assembled in Springfield February 
5 to participate in the 25th Eagle Scout Citizenship Day. 

Elected by the scouts as Boy Scout Governor for the 
three-day activity was 18-year-old Eric Jones, the son of 
rapid transit motorman Allen Jones. The youth is a graphic 
design student at the Chicago Art Institute, and a 1984 
alumnus of Percy Julian High School. 

Legislators noted that Jones is the first minority in the 
history of Eagle Scout Citizenship Day to be elected its 
governor. 

The annual activity coincided with the observance of 
Black History Month as well as the 75th anniversary of Boy 
Scouts of America. BSA was founded by newspaper 
publisher W. D. Boyce, and chartered in New York on 
February 2, 1910. 

Jones won the governor's seat, the only elected post for 
Eagle Scout Citizenship Day, following a campaign where 
he was pitted against five other scouts. Those vying for the 
position were required to write speeches, which they 
delivered before their peers for consideration. 

Jones, one of three scouts representing the Chicago area, 
was elected Boy Scout Governor in a final runoff against 
three other scouts. Other Eagle Scout Citizenship Day 
government officers were appointed. 

Reflecting on his experience, Jones said, "Eagle Scout 
Citizenship Day enabled me to get a better understanding of 
what government is really all about. It's amazing how it can 
be very interesting, and at the same time boring." 

In addition to being at Governor Thompson's side 
throughout the experience, Jones, along with other scouts, 
was a special gallery guest as the governor delivered his 
"State of the State" address. 

Besides special certificates and other mementoes he 
received to commemorate the day he was elected Boy 
Scout Governor, Eric Jones returned to Chicago when the 
day ended in a style befitting a chief executive of state — 
aboard the governor's private jet . tBCtB 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 3 



Commendation Corner 



James Rivers (Limits garage) 
was called "one of your best 
drivers" by Maxine Bernard, 
of Marine Drive, who often 
rides his No. 156 LaSalle 
bus. "I have never en- 
countered a more pleasant 
and agreeable driver. He 
always has a nice word for 
his passengers, along with a 
smile. Most of the 
passengers know him by 
name, and he knows theirs! I 
worked as a flight attendant 
for a number of years, so I 
realize what it takes to deal 
with the public. People are 
sometimes overbearing, to 
say the least. But he never 
loses his temper, is never 
cross, upset or rude to 
anyone. He is always a 
perfect gentleman, doing his 
best to serve his passengers. " 



Adolph Marth (Forest Glen garage) was thanked by 
Carl Rothbauer, of North Paulina Street, for his 
thoughtfulness as operator of a No. 81 Lawrence bus. 
"Last night this man held his bus for me while I ran with 
two shopping bags on icy sidewalks until I got inside. This 
alone is exceptional. 1 might have just heartily thanked 
him, as I did, but I noticed he greeted each passenger 
with a 'Good evening,' and cautioned people alighting to 
'Watch out for the ice.' I know you get enough negative 
letters, as I am a retired postal service employee. I hope 
that this excellent person is given an award of some 
kind." 

Sylvester Neal Jr. (77th Street garage) was commend- 
ed for "taking the extra time to do his job well" on a No. 6 
Jeffery Express bus by Steven Lestition, of East Hyde 
Park Boulevard. "It was a bitterly cold night, and for 
some reason the southbound bus was already filled by the 
time it reached Randolph. I and other commuters were 
most grateful that the driver encouraged the other 
passengers to move to the rear and make every inch of 
space available for new passengers. The driver took the 
whole situation with the best of humor. He drove with 
care and skill, and got us to our destinations safely and 
expediently." 

Bobby Brown (North Park garage) won the respect of 
Mary OTousa, of Belden Avenue, for his help as 
operator of a No. 151 Sheridan bus. "My wallet was 
stolen from my purse. Upon discovering this, I spoke up 
and requested its return . Mr. Brown immediately stopped 
the bus and phoned in for a squad car. The wallet was 
then dropped on the floor and recovered. I firmly believe 
that without Mr. Brown's prompt intervention, the wallet 
would not have been dropped. This is the first time I have 
been a crime victim. While I regret the incident, I feel for- 
tunate that Mr. Brown was the driver when it occured." 




Lee Lampley (77th Street 
garage) was complimented 
by Sonya Guttman, of South 
Hyde Park Boulevard, for his 
courtesy on a No. 6 Jeffery 
Express bus. "If riding the 
CTA can ever be considered 
pleasant, a trip on his bus 
comes close. He is a safe, 
careful, considerate and ex- 
pert driver. He actually drives 
as though his passengers 
are people, and not a load of 
moldy potatoes he can't wait 
to dump. He is unfailingly 
good-humored, polite and 
cheerful. It is a pleasure to 
board his bus and have him 
actually smile and say, 'Good 
morning.' If awards are given 
for consistently good and 
pleasant service, he should 
win them every month." 



James Kolstad (Beverly garage) was appreciated by 
Charles Gronski, of West 60th Street, for the way he 
handled his No. 52A South Kedzie bus. "He had a kind 
word of greeting for most of his boarding passengers, 
especially senior citizens. As he approached each stop, 
he clearly announced the street, even if no passengers 
were getting on or off. This driver answered questions 
posed by passengers who were confused about the 
change on the Kedzie run during rush hours, now that 
buses go all the way to Archer. His driving skill matched 
his courtesy. A training film with him in action would be 
helpful to other CTA drivers." 

William Ward (Limits garage) was praised by Vera 
Anderson, of North Newland Avenue. "I was riding a 
No. 145 (Wilson/Michigan) bus, sitting on the long seat 
in front. It was a cold day, and the window behind my 
back was flapping slightly, letting in chilly breezes. I felt 
cold, so I changed to the next seat. To my surprise, the 
driver stopped the bus at the next stop sign, jumped out, 
adjusted the window to shut tight, and jumped back into 
the bus, all in a matter of seconds. I was amazed, since I 
didn't ask him to do it. I noticed he was courteous, not 
only to me, but to everyone else on that bus. That ride 
was a pleasure." 

Chester Robertson (Archer garage) is considered "a 
dedicated employee" by Janette Gay, who rides his No. 
99 Stevenson Express bus regularly to her job at the 
Chicago Sun-Times. "I take the 8 a.m. bus from Archer 
and Harlem to State and Kinzie. I have used your service 
for many years, but getting to work since riding this bus 
has been a delight. I've never before seen such a plea- 
sant, polite and considerate driver. He says 'Good morn- 
ing' with a smile, waits that extra second on passengers 
running to catch the bus, gets his passengers downtown 
by 9 a.m., and always says 'Have a good day.' ' 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Kudos for CTA 
lost and found 



A rider who left her briefcase on a 
No. 125 Water Tower Express bus 
received prompt, courteous assistance 
from CTA telephone operator Marilvn 
Borg, bus operator Ronald Brown 
who turned in the briefcase, and clerk 
Ira Brown who notified her of the 
recovery. The following is the rider's 
note of appreciation. 

Just a quick note to thank the really 
nice, helpful CTA people who helped 
me retrieve my briefcase last night. 

To tell the truth, after I got off the 
125 bus and realized I'd left my brief- 
case, I was totally depressed. I didn't 
think I'd ever get it back — or at least I 
would have to spend hours getting 
through the giant CTA bureaucracy. 



'Please give my thanks 

and warm wishes to 

the two people who 

helped me ..." 



What a pleasant surprise and a 
delight to be proved wrong. 

Please give my thanks and warm 
wishes to the two people who helped 
me: The woman who answered your 
24-hour lost and found number and 
stayed with me until she connected me 
with the right garage — the one where 
my bus had gone. She was very plea- 
sant and sympathetic. Also thank the 
man at the garage who found my 
briefcase and had been trying to reach 
me before I got home. 

I made a quick trip to the Clark 
street garage to pick it up from him. 
Within an hour and a half after I lost it, 
I had my briefcase back. 

I think your 24-hour lost and found 
service is an excellent public service 
idea. I certainly appreciated it last 
night. 

Sincerely, 
Nancy S. Bishop 



THANKS for a job well done 



Employees who have received 
commendations from the public. 



Rosa Alfaro, Forest Glen 
Lee Aschoff, North Park 

Margaret Bernasko, 77th Street 
Deidre Berry, Jefferson Park 
William Bibbs. 77th Street 
Thomas Bonner, North Park 
George Bowen Jr., North Avenue 
Alfred Bowman, Limits 
Cornell Brown, 77th Street 
Mosea Buchanan, 77th Street 
James Bush, 69th Street 
Robert Byrd, North Park 

Jean Cage, North Park 
Eugene Caldwell, North Park 
Sergio Candelaria, Limits 
Lawrence Carter, 77th Street 
Charles Clayton, 77th Street 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
Dewitt Coleman, Archer 
George Collins, Forest Glen 
Nilda Colorado, North Park 
Arthur Colyette, District A 
Roosevelt Conklin, Archer 
Robert Cook, North Park 
Marvin Covington, Limits 
Daniel Cox, Howard/Kimball 

Earmon Davis, Limits 
Thomas Davis, Special Services 
Arthur DeLuna, North Avenue 
Theonia Dunn, Archer 
Elizabeth Duren, North Avenue 

Jesse Ellis, Beverly 

Nora Flynn-Mitchner, Special Ser 

vices 

William Foster, General 

Maintenance 

Joseph Gale, Forest Glen 
George Gavrilos, North Park 
Daniel Glover, Kedzie 
Paul Gonsiewski, Kedzie 
Carmelo Gonzalez, North Park 
Dorothy Graham, Limits 

August Hallmann, Forest Glen 
Sarah Henderson, Kedzie 
Jerome Holmes, North Park 
John Hopkins, 77th Street 
Gerald Howard, 69th Street 

Ladell Jackson, North Avenue 
Willie James. North Park 
Eula Jan-eft, North Park 



Cornelius Marshall, North Park 
Geru Martin, Forest Park 
Terin Martinez, Kedzie 
Valerie McAuley, North Section 
Flora McClure, 69th Street 
Juan Montes, North Park 
Michael Moore, District B 

Dianna Owens, Forest Glen 
Frederick Pepke, Limits 
Gloria Phillips. 69th Street 
Nadine Polk, Limits 
Antonio Poulos, Jefferson Park 
Michael Powell, Howard/Kimball 
Gwendolyn Preston, West Section 
Herberto Pulgar, North Avenue 

Ruben Quiles, Jefferson Park 

Billy Ragsdale, 77th Street 
Jose Ramos, Archer 
Clyde Randolph, 69th Street 
Merton Reeder, North Park 
Franciscus Remeeus, North Park 
Kenneth Richards, Limits 
Alexander Robertson, District D 
Toval Rolston, Forest Park 

Rena Sammon, Douglas/Congress 
John Smith, 77th Street 
Ruth Smith, Special Services 
Anna Stewart, North Avenue 
Mitchell Szalwa, Forest Glen 

Alfred Taylor, Archer 

Lee Thompson, North Park 

David Tucker, North Avenue 

Hazel Walker, Limits 
Bonnie Walker, Data Processing 
Sheila Watkins, Kedzie 
Conrad Weil, Forest Glen 

Wendy Whiteley, Archer 
James Williams, Archer 
Alvin Williams Sr., Special Ser- 
vices 

Parmela Willis, Archer 
Donald Woods, Limits 
Gus Wright, Beverly 
Bartholomew Wurtzebach, 
Howard/Kimball 

Jacques Yezeguielian. North 

Avenue 

Charles Young, Jefferson Park 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 3 





mm 




AS REPORTED BY EMPLOYEES OF THE CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 



Welcome to Inside News. This column is devoted to vignettes of special 
interest to you and about CTA employees. Volunteers from each work location 
are being sought to help make this one of the most-read features of Transit News. 
If you're interested in reporting the many amusing experiences and other interesting 
news tidbits of your coworkers, please contact our editor. 

Inside News will run the gamut of outstanding accomplishments, projects, weddings, 
births, graduations, trips, and a variety of other items which might be of interest to you 
and your co-workers. The only restrictions will be available space, and good taste. 



MEET YOUR REPORTER 



HELLO, FELLOW CO- 
WORKERS! I am your new 
volunteer Inside News 
Reporter for the Transit 
News at 69th Street 
Garage. If you have any 
newsworthy items that you 
care to share, please look 
me up. Any idea or sug- 
gestion to help me keep 
69th Street in the news will 
be appreciated. 

Sincerely, 

Operator Ellie Head, 

#7871 




Ellie Head 



69th Street 

March Birthdays - Happy Birthday To You! THEODAS 
SMITH, BESSIE HARRISON, NELSON BAILEY, 
ROBERT SEVIER, JAMES PERKINS, BENNIE BANKS, 
DAVID GORDON, CLEOPHIA PENDLETON. WILLIAM 
WADE Jr., ROBERT CROCKETT Jr.. CLINTON LEWIS, 
LARRY POLK, JUDY BROWN, LEWIS BURTON Jr., 
HAROLD CLEMONS, LAWRENCE RILEY, VIOLA 
WATKINS, DOROTHY BROOKINS, RONALD 
WHEATLEY, EDWARD WILSON, CARL MATHIS, 
WILLIAM DRYE, LON JONES, ERNEST DeFORNEAU 
Jr., FLENARD PORTER, LINDA GREEN, DORIS AT- 
WATER, JIMMIE EVANS, WILL TAYLOR, ROSETTA 
JONES, ALONZO CLAYBON, MARY HAYNES, LELA 
STEELE, FRANCES ARNOLD, WILLIE SMITH, JOSEPH 
BARRIOS, HARRY GREEN, JEREMIAH BALLARD, 
CALVIN ARMSTRONG, RICHARD MASSEY, JOHN 
SINGLETON Jr., JIMMIE HILL, CANNIE DAVISON, 
CAROL REED, GREGORY BOYD. SAMUEL 
CALDWELL, SYLVESTER MOORE, RUTH EWIN, 
MARY WARE, MARVIN YOUNG, JOSEPH BARBEE . . . 



'SPECIAL EVENTS* On February 13, 1985, 69th Street 
hosted a candlelight memorial service for HELEN 
RICHARD, slain CTA driver. The ceremony was sponsored 
by the RICHARD FAMILY, CTA, and the Global Commit- 
tee Commemorating King's Day. A plaque bearing the im- 
age of Helen Richard was presented to 69th, honoring Ms. 
Richard as an outstanding bus driver who died in the line of 
duty. The plaque will remain at 69th Street Garage. It is the 
first such commemoration in the history of the CTA . . . 
Welcome back to DANIEL SERRITELLA (formerly #9027), 
who just recuperated from surgery at Holy Cross Hospital. 
Mr. Serritella is a 69th Street retiree since January 1983 . . . 
Get well soon to VINCENT JOBSON, #5342. who is 
recuperating from back surgery in Augustana Hospital . . . 
ROSA WARREN, #6365, is at home recuperating after an 
accident February 15. Hurry back, Rosa! . . Operator 
GEORGIA GUYTON, #2517, was seen walking around 
with a cast on her left arm. Poor Georgia! . . L. 
WEATHERSBY, #4142, Team #5 captain for the ES/PP 
program, is glad to be back to work. Weathersby had been 
off since December 3 after an injury to his right hand and 
leg. We're happy he's back too ... A speedy recovery goes 
out to OTIS SCURLOCK, #4684, who has been off since 
January 22 with an injury to his left wrist . . . Operator 
ISAIAH TAYLOR. #3445, is happy to be back after two 
weeks off sick. He returned March 5 . . . Our condolences to 
Operator LINDA BELLAMY in the death of her sister . . . 
Mouth to Mouth : Who did this roving reporter spot kissing in 
the back of the station on February 20, 1985? . . Which 
operators do I see hugging all the time? . . Who was seen 
driving around on the Special Services bus on a temporary 
assignment? Answers in next month's 
issue . . . Two new bouncing arrivals 
for 69th Street parents: BRANDON 
RAMERRO WRIGHT/NORWOOD, 
born February 6, 1985 to TONYA R. 
NORWOOD and CARL WRIGHT. 
Little Brandon weighed in at 6 pounds 
10V2 ounces. RODERICK BRAN- 
DON ELSTON was born December 
17, 1984 at University of Illinois 
Brandon R. Wright/Norwood 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



im m\DZ mm 




Roderick B. Elston 



Hospital. Proud dad JESSE ELSTON 
says he weighed in at 7 pounds 5V2 
ounces. Congratulations to all! . . 
Welcome back to 69th Street Garage 
Superintendent JOSEPH STEIN- 
BACK, who's sporting a tan these 
days. Mr. Steinback enjoyed a three- 
week vacation traveling all over the 
Florida Gulf, staying with friends in 
their $300,000-condo, and sailing 
every day. If you ever travel in the 
southern states, look for the Cracker Barrel Restaurant. 
That's good eating, states Mr. Steinback. My, some people 
get all the breaks! . . Congratulations to VERNELL 
ROBERTS, *6089, on his engagement. Wedding date will 
be set later . . . EASTER THOUGHT: Some people have 
funny habits, thinking Easter is a rabbit. Happy Easter from 
69th Street. 

- Ellie Head 

North Park 

Well, Inside News is back, along with those bits and pieces 
of news concerning some or all of us here at North Park . . . 
Welcome to our new Garage Superintendent, SAM 
SMITH, along with congratulations to newly-appointed 
Assistant Superintendent SY MOTEN . . . Credit Union 
member DUSTY WRIGHT's wife, CAROL, set a course 
record for running time in competition recently, and is now 
rated 19th in the country by Ultra Runners magazine . . . 
Birthdays: MARY WALLACE (CTA's first female operator) 
and son, MICKEY; MICHAEL M. FLORES, C. DIAL; 
BARB WILLIAMS, now at Limits; FLORINDA OR- 
CASITAS, Archer; and MAGGIE CHITTO . . . Sick recent- 
ly and now back to work is EULA JARRETT . . . VICKY 
NESBIT has been discharged from the hospital . . . Has 
Assistant Superintendent KENNY CZACHOWSKI, who 
recently bowled in the Peterson Classic tournament, men- 
tioned a score yet? . . Admit it, folks, our day janitor, 
ROBERT DENNIS, definitely keeps the station clean! ! . 
LEONARD LLOYD (Sheridan Road), our "Prince" 
lookalike: Do you ever get tired of those autograph re- 
quests? . . Sure, 8 years without a miss is an accomplish- 
ment, and more so when you live about one-half mile from 
Wisconsin's state line, as does GENUEL ALMODOVAR. 
Can he make 10? . . DORTHY M. SMITH and PEARLIE 
WILLIAMS, on North Park's committee, sponsored a gala 
Christmas affair on Saturday, December 22, 1984, at the 
elegant Hyatt Regency, 151 W. Wacker, in the Toronto 
Ballroom 'A'. Our honored guest was president of Local 
241, ELCOSIE GRESHAM, and several members of his 
family. Hope that everyone who missed it last year attends 
this year! 

-Michael M. Flores 

Materials Management 

We are happy that the Transit News staff has again started 
the "Inside News" section. Employees, don't be bashful -- 
see or call your reporters with items for the magazine. Field 
employees of Materials Management, don't forget, we want 
to hear from you too . . . The Stores Section of Materials 
Management recently hosted a tour of our Skokie 



warehouse installation for the American Material Manage- 
ment Society. These "state-of-the-art" tours are an effort by 
the Society to keep its members informed on new 
warehouse and distribution facilities in existence in the 
Chicago metropolitan area. The group found our narrow- 
aisle tri-loader wire-guided system of particular interest . . . 
On February 19, procurement engineers BOB KNUDSEN 
(electrical) and BERN1E KAZLAUSKAS (chemical) hosted 
an engineer's coffee to celebrate National Engineers Week, 
February 17-23. The theme was Engineers: Turning ideas 
into reality. Twenty-four of 
the Authority's staff attend- 




. MARY 
daughter 
engineer 
KAREN 



ed the event . 
GUEDIGUIAN. 
of procurement 
ZAVEN and 
GUEDIGUIAN, welcomed 
baby SUSAN into this 
world on October 5 . . . 
RUTH MARIE RIPKE, 
referred to as "Baby Ruth", 
daughter of CHUCK, 
special projects analyst, 
and REYNE, was born 
August 30. Baby Ruth has 
two sisters and a brother. 




"Baby Ruth" Ripke 



Congratulations to our new mommies and daddies . . . We 
have enough cats in Materials Management to produce our 
own cast of characters for T. S. Eliot's Broadway play 
CATS: Toby and Cady (RUTHANN MILES), Casey (LORI 
MUHLING), Nick and Nora and Tiki (NANCY 
SHOLDICE), and Snook-Snook (DENISE CALHOUN). 
Meow! . . BILLIE MITCHELL, buyer, and her husband, 
JUDSON, recently returned from a Caribbean cruise to 
Nassau and Freeport. Afterwards they spent four days in 
Orlando. Billie said she ". . . had a lovely time and hated to 
leave the 82 degree temperatures and sun." . . CAROL 
GRISETO, executive secretary, is vacationing in the 
beautiful aloha state, Hawaii . . . DOROTHY HARMON, 
salvage control clerk, visited her first grandson, DARRELL 
II, born on December 1, His daddy, DARRELL I, is an air- 
man with the U.S. Navy and is stationed in Hayward, 
California . . . ADELE MONSON. graphic information com- 
poser, Forms/Records and 
Procedures section, has 
another granddaughter. 
JACQUELINE RENE was 
born September 7. Her 
daddy is JIM ARNOUX. 
electrical worker. Skokie 
Shops. Congratulations... 
JIM MADDEN, supervisor, 
Disbursements and 
Records, Insurance depart- 
ment, is home 
recuperating from open 
heart surgery. Jim wishes 
to take this opportunity to 
thank everyone for their 
prayers and get well wishes. Hurry back, Jim . . . JOE 
FILEC's mother passed away after a long illness. All of us 




Jacqueline Rene Arnoux 



1985 Vol. 38— No. 3 




ran om» mm 



extend our sympathy to Joe and his family. Joe works in 
Financial Services ... It was good to hear from retirees 
MARY CLARKE (supervisor, Statistical Section, Train- 
ing/Accident Prevention), MARY STOMNER (former ex- 
ecutive secretary, Public Affairs Department), and RALPH 
REGNIER (former chauffeur to Chairman GEORGE L. De- 
MENT) . All of them want to be remembered to their friends. 
They all agree, there's nothing better than retirement! We 
wish them continued good health and happiness . . . 
PHYLLIS SHIELDS, payroll relief clerk, was feted at a 
delicious luncheon at the M&M Club. Phyllis and her hus- 
band, VINCE, will be moving to sunny Florida where they 
will set up housekeeping. We wish them a long and happy 
retirement. We'll all miss you. 

-Arlene Zittman 

Police Liaison 

Congratulations to JOHN (Capital Development) and 
KATHLEEN TROTTA, proud parents of a "Valentine 
Baby," KATHLEEN ROSE, who weighed in at 6 pounds 4 
ounces . . . Battle of the Bulge! ROBERT O'CONNOR has 
shed 26 pounds in 6 weeks! Congratulations! 

■Carol Musto 

Internal Audit 

JOE BRZEGOWY received a surprise "tax-exemption" 
right before Christmas, when he won a Cabbage Patch baby 
boy. Joe had the winning ticket in Walgreen's. At last count 
he had at least 50 congratulations cards on his new bundle. 
Joe's wife said the new addition was not going to change 
their life style at all . . .Bachelor of the Month will be CHET 
MANGALIK, who sent his wife, SAROJ (Datacenter), to In- 
dia for five weeks. Anyone wishing to apply for the job of 
cleaning and cooking for him during this time, please call 
Ext. 4642 . . . Welcome back to JOE CECALA of Field 
Review after a long six-week leave due to illness. He looks 
great . . . MARCELO REYES became a proud grandfather 
again when his daughter gave birth to a 10 pound baby girl. 
We asked Marcelo to tell us something about the baby, 
REYNA. He said, "Well, she's a girl." Thanks, Marcello. 
Congratulations too. 

■Joyce Petrich 



KAREN WILSON, agent 
controller in the Control 
Center, gave birth to a son, 
Joseph Austin King, on 
September 11, in St. 
Joseph Hospital. Joseph 
weighed nine pounds, four 
ounces at birth. His father, 
Gregory N. King, currently 
works for the New York 
Power Authority and will 
join his family this 
December. Joseph has a 
13-year-old sister, Evelyn 
Kathleen. 





Mulqueeny in 'Best of Times' 

The singing talent of Jim 
Mulqueeny, a planner with 
Operations Planning, was 
evident in 15 of the 37 
segments of the Oak Park 
Ascension Church stage 
production of "The Best of 
Times" which closed 
February 16. 

The show offered 
theater goers a musical 
entertainment variety 
which included the best of 
popular, swing, and rock 
Jim Mulqueeny anc j ro ll including music 

from the '50's era, and country gospel. 

Mulqueeny is a 1979 Harvard graduate where he earned 
a degree in transportation economics and was active in 
drama. He participated in three college drama club produc- 
tions and one experimental theater. The native Chicagoan 
also participated in "Loop Alive" 1982, and '83. 



Look alikes 

Rapid transit motorman An- 
tonio G. Poulos of O'Hare 
terminal, a 22-year CTA 
employee, and grandson 
George Zurales, show off 
look-alike uniforms. The 
miniature motorman's outfit 
was made by Mrs. Poulos, 
the toddler's grandmother. 




Retirement leisure 




Joseph Austin King 



This sextet of familiar faces from various CTA locations en- 
joys the benefits of CTA retirement in the Florida sun. They 
are (from left) Ted Peitrus, Tom Smith, Russ Shanklin, Earl 
Larson, Bud Rosendahl, and Joe Repplinger. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Maintenance employees honored on 'A Day in CTA 9 




"A Day in CTA " honorees and host tour Control Center. Pictured are host David Perez (left), performance control analyst, Personnel Ser- 
vices, Engineering and Maintenance; James Van Grimbergen and Terry Howe, both Skokie Shops electricians; Gerald Poces, South Shops 
warehouse worker; and Dwyer Williams, Washington garage bus servicer. They listen as bus controller Roy Cameron (in striped shirt) ex- 
plains the Control Center's bus operations. 

Two Skokie Shop electricians who 
design and construct testing devices to 
simulate train car operations for im- 
proving servicing quality, and two bus 
garage maintenance workers whose 
quick actions put out fires in their 
respective garages, were honored with 
"A Day in CTA." 

Terry Howe and James Van 
Grimbergen, both Skokie Shops elec- 
trical journeymen, design and build 
various test devices which enable shop 
crews to simulate car operations. 
Through their efforts, they help pro- 
vide highest quality rebuilt parts for 
use on rapid transit cars, said R. M. 
Schneider, manager, Equipment 
Engineering and Maintenance. 

Dwyer Williams, Washington 
garage bus servicer, saw smoke and 
flames coming from a bus in the 
garage. He quickly used a bus fire ex- 
tinguisher to bring the fire under con- 
trol and called for assistance. His ac- 
tions averted a critical situation, said 
Schneider. 

Gerald Poces, South Shops 
warehouse worker, saw a fire on the 
roof of the garage's degreasing room. 
He called to fellow employees to sum- 




Four honorees receive "A Day in CTA" certificates from R. M. Schneider (seated), 
manager, Equipment Engineering and Maintenance. Standing are (from left) Frank 
Venezia, director, Rail Maintenance, Skokie Shop; honorees Poces, Williams, Van 
Grimbergen, and Howe; and Terry McGuigan, director. Bus Maintenance, South Shops. 



mon the Chicago Fire Department and 
used a nearby water hose to fight the 
blaze . 

Chicago firefighters soon arrived on 
the scene and Poces provided 



assistance to them as they quelled the 
blaze. 

The fire did only minor damage, 
thanks to the alertness of Poces, 
Schneider said. . 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 3 



11 



Chicago Public 

Library 
Cultural Center 



"Dreamweaver," an exhibition of 
wearable art and small-scale sculpture 
is now in the West Gallery of the 
Chicago Public Library, 78 East 
Washington Street. The exhibit con- 
tinues through May 13. For weekly 
updated listings of events, dial F-I-N-E 
ART (346-3278). 



Columbia College 



Columbia College will hold the 
final curtain call for its musical produc- 
tion of Godspell with "Dionisio" on 
Mothers Day, May 12, at the College 
theater, 62 East 11th Street. Students 
and senior citizens, $2. The show 
begins at 7 p.m. 

Columbia College Museum of 
Contemporary Photography offers 
selections from the Chicago 
Photographers Project Print Study 
Room for the discriminating photo en- 
thusiast. 

This exhibit of excellent selections 
which ends May 4 features the work of 
40 Chicago area photographers. 

Photography department faculty 
member Edward West also exhibits 
silver prints through May 4. No admis- 
sion fees are required. Call 663-9462 
for information. 




Field Museum of 
Natural History 



"The Art of Cameroon" in Western 
Africa is an art of royalty and 
splendor... of wealth and social 
status. . . Come see the treasures of the 
grassfield kings and their secret 
societies... carved, in beaded human 
figures, mysterious ceremonial masks 
and thrones. See the royal animals, 
leopards and elephants in their beaded 
resplendence. Discover who hides 
behind the sacred dance masks of the 
Cameroon kingdoms! Special free ex- 
hibit. Grand Opening March 9, 1985! 
2nd FI. Through June 16 only. 

Especially for Children and 
Families — Ever touch a shooting 
star or pet a mounted polar bear? Field 



Your calendar 
highlights 
are needed 

After Hours will continue to feature 
a long-range calendar of educational 
and cultural events for Transit News 
readers. 

We encourage you to share your 
long range plans with us and make the 
employee publication a one-stop 
shopping tour. We welcome informa- 
tion on your not-for-profit activities, 
from the theater to the museum or 
classroom. 



Museum's "Place for Wonder" allows 
youngsters of all ages to do these 
things and more. Listen to the sounds 
of seashells; see imprints of fossilized 
prehistoric plants and animals; and 
touch the feathers of area birds. 
Volunteers are on hand to guide ex- 
ploration; exhibit is braille-equipped. 
1st FI. Free with museum admission. 
Call 922-9410 for hours. 



Enter the "Pawnee Earth 
Lodge" and travel back through time. 
Visitors to this 38-foot wide replica of 
an 1850 dwelling sit on buffalo robes, 
hear exciting tales of Indian lore, and 
handle items of Pawnee life — rattles, 
saddles, bows and arrows. Hours: 
Mon-Fri 1 p.m.; Sat 11 a.m., 11:45 
a.m., 1 p.m., 1:45 p.m.; Sun Open 
House 1-3 p.m. 2nd FI. Free with 
museum admission. 



Weekend Passport Programs — 

Saturdays and Sundays throughout 
the year: Here's a fun way to delve in- 
to natural history — from archaic 
Egyptian mummies to mounted 
animals so life-like, it's hard to believe 
they're not alive! Visitors are taken in- 
side the world of natural history at 
Field Museum through tours, 
demonstrations, slide lectures and 
films related to Museum exhibits and 
designed for families and adults. 
Check the entrances for exact infor- 
mation on each weekend's listings. 

"Plants of the World" Exhibit - 

Be amazed by the exquisite detail, 
vibrancy of color and superb crafts- 
manship of the world's largest collec- 
tion of plant models. Having taken 
over 60 years to hand-craft (now a lost 
art form), the models give a unique 
three-dimensional look at a variety of 
familiar and rare plants and flowers — 
from algae to orchids. Third FI. 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Service anniversaries 
in March 

35 Years 

Marie Coarl, Payroll Accounting 
Alfred Haas, South Shops 
Arthur Joe. Schedules 
Charles Myers, Desplaines Maint. 
Albert Rakestraw, Ashland Terminal 
Paul Shackley, Jefferson Park 
Margaret Walker, Accounting 

30 Years 

Howard Means, Special Services 
Calvin Pollard, Civil Engineering 
Billy Small. North Park 

25 Years 

Arthur Bennett, Training Center 
Terry Oil kin. South Shops 
Peter Fallest, South Shops 
Delbert Martz, Jefferson Park 
George Matejovsky, Elec Engr 
James Person, General Maint. 
Mary Raftery, North Section 
Patrick Soden, 54th Maint 



March Pensioners 

SAM CATANZARO, Rail Janitor. 

Madison/Wabash. Emp. 5-17-71 
VINCENT ECTER. Collector. 

77th Street. Emp. 2-11-54 
GERALD FARRELL. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 2-10-47 
ROBERT FLOWERS. Supt . Qual Cont., 

Skokie Shop. Emp 1-10-49 
WILLIAM GREER. Collector. 

77th Street. Emp 6-26-51 
DOROTHY HOLLAND. Typist I, 

Safety Assurance. Emp 3-25-74 
MARIANO 1MBRAGUGLIO. Engr. Asst.. 

Fac. Engr. & Maint.. Emp. 3-24-48 
LEWIS KAZDA. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 8-5-49 
ALBERT KEMNITZ. Motorman, 

West Section, Emp. 11-3-58 
FRANK KOSTRZEWA Jr., Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 2-14-55 
JOSEPH LONGO. Motorman. 

Forest Park, Emp. 12-4-61 
ORVAN LYLES. Bus Operator. 

Archer. Emp. 12-9-57 



JOSEPH MOTYKA, Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen. Emp 1-29-46 
EDWARD POTTER. Bus Reparer. 

77th Street. Emp 3-21-57 
WILLIAM ROBINSON. Money Handler 1. 

Central Counting. Emp 10 9-61 
CURLEY RUSSELL. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 8-11-55 
HENRY SIUBA. Meisel Pressman. 

Equip Engr & Maint . Emp 2-5-51 
HARVEY SMITH. Car Servicer. 

Rosemont. Emp 11-7-57 
CHARLEY STOVES. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 2-3-72 
WILLIE WALTON Jr . Serv. Trk Chauff 

West Shops. Emp 10-22-53 
STEVEN ZELLNER. Signal Foreman. 

West Shops. Emp 6-24-57 

Disability Retirements 

WILLIAM FISHER. Clerk. 

77th Street, Emp 4-23-59 
HARRY MURAWSKI. Bus Repairer. 

Equip Engr & Maint.. Emp. 4-14-71 
EDIL SANCHEZ. Bus Operator. 

North Park. Emp. 1-28-74 




JOHN H. AMBLER. 89. Way & Structs., 

Emp 1-1-16, Died 1-21-85 
JOSEPH BARTA, 88. Kedzie, 

Emp. 10-28-19, Died 12-25-84 
STANLEY E. BAST, 83, West Section, 

Emp. 9-9-21, Died 1-28-85 
MORRIS R. BURDA, 60, West Section, 

Emp. 8-18-52, Died 1-9-85 
JOSEPH R BUTKUS, 68, Maintenance. 

Emp. 6-8-45, Died 1-22-85 
ARTHUR R CALDER, 68. Transportation, 

Emp 8-19-41. Died 1-11-85 
ARTHUR J. CLAUSSEN, 81. North Avenue. 

Emp. 3-10-34. Died 1-10-85 
ANTHONY J. DIELLE, 73, 77th Street. 

Emp 4-6-42. Died 1-8-85 
ARTHUR DIXON. 91, Electrical. 

Emp. 4-3-24, Died 1-23-85 
MARY G. DRISCOLL, 81. South Section, 

Emp. 6-24-29. Died 1-14-85 



IN MEMORIAM 



MARY E. EVERDING. 99. West Section. 

Emp. 8-12-35. Died 1-30-85 
SALVATORE J GARRO. 71, Claims, 

Emp. 1-28-35, Died 1-10-85 
GIUSEPPE GIAMPIETRO, 80, Track. 

Emp. 5-4-45, Died 12-18-84 
JACK M HILLMAN. 80, Special Invest.. 

Emp 7-10-29. Died 1-1-85 
JOHN J HOWE. 90. 77th Street. 

Emp 7-14-27. Died 1-15-85 
HOWARD H JOHNSON. 67, Forest Glen, 

Emp 8-30-47. Died 1-29-85 
JOSEPH KERESZTURI. 81, South Shops. 

Emp. 5-7-24. Died 11-5-84 
GEORGE C KUEHN. 81. Transportation. 

Emp 12-16-26. Died 1-25-85 
RALPH W LINDLEY. 77. 77th Street. 

Emp 1-4-36. Died 1-16-85 
GEORGE E LYONS. 76, CTA Police. 

Emp 11-24-41, Died 1-8-85 



A birthday celebration 

Joseph Vandenover (center, seated), a 
former 69th Street bus operator, and a 
CTA retiree for 25 years, celebrated his 
90th birthday recently with his nine 
children. Members of the family are 
(seated from left) Joseph, Jr., Phoenix, 
Arizona, and Tom, of Perry Hall, Maryland. 
Standing (from left) Betty Luback, 
Chicago Heights; Dorothy Barron, 
Markham; Helen Mennis, East Hazel 
Crest; Margaret Diebel, Wood Dale; 
Robert, Oak Forest, Ceil Klevowski, 
Schamburg, and James, of Crete. The 
sons and daughters treated their father to 
supper, and the following day held a pic- 
nic. The family includes 33 grandchildren, 
and seven great-grandchildren. Mrs. Bar- 
ron, with whom Vandenover lives, said her 
father had 34 years of service when he 
retired. He began his transit career with 
the Chicago Surface Lines and was one of 
the first streetcar motormen to switch to 
buses. 



WILLIAM McWALTER. 84. 61st Street. 

Emp. 6-13-25. Died 1-27-85 
JOSEPH E MOORE. 68, Lawndale. 

Emp 9-17-62. Died 1-24-85 
THOMAS MURPHY. 96. Kedzie. 

Emp. 2-9-10. Died 1-23-85 
BRUNO PAPSIS. 89. South Shops. 

Emp 12-20-18. Died 1-17-85 
JOSEPH L SIWEK. 71. South Shops. 

Emp 7 2 46. Died 1-22-85 
JOHN J STICH. 74. North Avenue. 

Emp. 12-5-40. Died 1-31-85 
THOMAS E THACKER. 88. South Shops. 

Emp. 2-17 36. Died 1-27-85 
DAVID P TOB1N. 80. West Section. 

Emp 12-19-23. Died 1-13-85 
SAM TRIFUNOV. 83. Track. 

Emp 10-28-30. Died 1-22-85 
PETER J WEST. 78. Electrical. 

Emp 3 5-26. Died 1 10-85 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 3 



13 




RETIREMENT 




■HHHHHH ■■■■■■■■■^■^HII 



Special Services family fetes a special operator 




Isaac Beat, director, Special Services, presents a plaque to Sam Thomas 
which reads, in part, "K-362, 10-7" (run number, out of service). 



January 31, retirement eve for Sam 
Thomas, was not to be your ordinary 
"10-7" at Washington garage. 

Thomas made his final run and 
returned to the Special Services 
garage shortly after noon, where he 
found some 50 co-workers gathered 
for a surprise party. The fest included 
all of the gourmet treats made 
especially to please Thomas' palate. 

"We really put one over on him," 
said Isaac Beal, director of Special 
Services. He said Thomas was re- 
duced to tears. "It was a catered affair, 
but so many people brought food 
items from home which they knew 
Sam liked. He really didn't know what 
to think about the way everybody 



turned out to wish him the best for the 
future," said Beal. 

TV newsmen, on the scene for 
another story, recorded footage on the 
farewell party, and the next day Sam's 
retirement send-off was on the lighter 
side of the WMAQ-TV evening news. 

The Washington Special Services 
"family" presented Thomas with a 
commemorative plaque for his years 
of CTA service. Its bottom line read, 
"K-362, 10-7" (run number, out of 
service). 

Not only was Sam Thomas a 
favorite at Washington garage, but he 
was well-liked by his riders. "Since his 
February 1 retirement, one lady who 
always rode with Sam told me that his 



Toronto bound 




Dorothy Holland, typist I, Safety 
Performance Analysis, received a 
plaque created by Tom Boyle, 
manager. Safety, detailing highlights 
of her 11 -year CTA career. 

A farewell party honoring Ms. 
Holland's March 1 retirement was held 
in the Safety department office on 
February 26, and eighty of her friends 
and co-workers attended. Other gifts 
included a gold ring set with diamonds 
and onyx, a gold chain bracelet, a 
cash gift and a quart of Canadian Club 
"for medicinal purposes only." 

Following her retirement she 
planned to move to the Toronto area 
in Canada. She has two daughters, a 
son, and four grandchildren, all living 
in Canada. 

kindness and patience was really a life- 
saver to her," said Beal. 

Beal recalled that when he himself 
joined CTA in 1959, Thomas was 
already working at 69th Street garage, 
where Isaac Beal was later to become 
assistant superintendent. "It was 
Thomas who encouraged me to get in- 
to management even though he re- 
mained a bus operator. 

"I will always remember the words 
of encouragement which he had for 
me and many others. I think many of 
us owe Sam a lot," said Beal. 

Sam Thomas and his wife plan to 
move to the warmer climes of Mem- 
phis, his native home. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



A Family Celebration 




Willie B. Scott, superintendent. Traffic 
Analysis, closed out 33 years of ser- 
vice with CTA at a retirement lun- 
cheon January 16 in the M & M Club, 
where he was honored by Norman 
Oswald, director, Schedules, and 
Ernest Sawyer. Deputy Executive 
Director, Planning and Development 
Flanking Willie and his wife, Phyllis, 
are daughters Michelle Howard (se- 
cond from left) and Cynthia Blue, and 
in front are grandchildren Justin and 
Lynette Howard. At left is Ron Wells. 
and on the right, Roslyn Bufford, both 
family friends. 



I Service Memento 

Payroll clerk Viola Meyer accepts a 
memento of her 29 years of CTA ser- 
vice from Gerald Kurowski, payroll 
supervisor, Financial Services, as 
John Cannon (left), superintendent, 
Account Operations, and Bryant 
Jakubowski (right), unit supervisor, 
look on. Ms Meyer retired February 1 
following an open house held in her 
honor in the CTA board room at the 
Merchandise Mart. Her plans for the 
future may include moving to a 
warmer climate. 




37-year career 




Mariano (Marty) Imbraguglio. senior 
engineering assistant in the Building 
and Wiring section of the Facilities 
Engineering and Maintenance depart- 
ment, enjoys one of his retirement 
gifts, a plaque created by Tom Boyle, 
manager. Safety department, featur- 
ing highlights of his career. Patrick 
Murphy (left), senior design engineer, 
acted as emcee of the retirement party 
held February 28 in the M&M Club of 
the Merchandise Mart marking the end 
of Marty's 37 years with CTA He also 
received a cash gift from his many 
friends Marty and his wife, Kay. live 
in Norridge and have three daughters. 
The couple plan to live in the Chicago 
area and enjoy some traveling in the 
U.S. and Europe. 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 3 



15 



WANTED 

for the June issue of TRANSIT NEWS: 



Pictures of high school or college 

students graduating in 1985 who are sons or 
daughters of CTA employees. 

All pictures must be taken by a professional 
photographer and MUST be wallet size. On 
the back of the picture, please provide the 
student's full name and school as well as the 
employee's name and work location. Pictures 
cannot be returned. 

Please submit pictures to: CTA TRANSIT 
NEWS, Merchandise Mart, Room 734, 
Chicago, IL 60654. 

DEADLINE for pictures - May 14, 1985. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555. Chicago, Illinois 60654 




BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT No. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 




Transit Mews 



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ol. 38, No, 4, 1985, For^-QhicagoTiansit Authotity Employees and Retirees 

'85 Season 



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Architect's family- 
history has 
rich Chicago heritage 



c 



TA architect Ernest Cherry of the 
Engineering department is among a 
distinguished group of blacks whose 
heritage in Chicago dates back five 
generations to the late 1880s, when 
the first black settlement was estab- 
lished on the city's West Side. 

A bit of the Cherry family roots sur- 
faced recently as a group of West Side 
residents, community service, and 
civic groups embarked on a project, 
"Looking Backward to Move 
Forward." The project researches the 
history of black Chicagoans on the 
West Side. 

The Chicago Tribune's City Trib 
noted that Wiley Cherry, our 
architect's grandfather, migrated to 
Chicago from his native North 
Carolina in 1893 and started a grocery 
store at Wolcott Avenue and Lake 
Street. 

In later years, he closed the store 
and opened a coal and ice hauling and 
moving business on West Lake Street, 
which he operated until his death in 
1920. 

This typical 1900s Chicago 
businessman's history is documented 
through photographs by Wiley's 
granddaughter, Mrs. Lorraine Heflin, 
a life-long West Side resident, who is 
very active in civic affairs and is Ernest 
Cherry's sister. 

Cherry, who joined CTA in April 
1980 after 21 years of service as an ar- 
chitect with the Chicago Board of 
Education and the City of Chicago, 
said that although he is not directly in- 
volved with "Looking Backward to 
Move Forward," the project is a source 
of pride to him. 

"It really feels good to know that my 
family's history can be traced back to 
the years when Chicago's West Side 
business community was in the 
developmental stages, and to realize 
the contributions my grandparents 
made and the progress our people 
have made since those early days." 




Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Cherry catch the photographer's eye along 
with two of their five children. Posing with mom and dad are Mrs. 
Arlene Marentic (left), and Miss Valma Cherry (right). 




The fifth generation of the Cherry family, all grandchildren of CTA 
architect Ernest Cherry, pose for posterity. Standing alone in the 
front row is Stephanie Marentic. Others are (from left) Jeffery 
Cherry, Kimberely, Karen, and Laura Marentic (second row); April 
Street, Michael Cherry, Fredrick Marentic, and Doria Street (third 
row); Eric and Michell Street, and Anthony Marentic (fourth row). 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



CTA's little library 
^ has 
BlCa libraries inside 




Ms. Lillian D. Culbertson, Superintendent, CTA/Anthon Memorial 
Library, and Ms. Marilyn Cichon, Librarian, Greeley & Hansen 
sanitary engineers of Chicago, at computer terminal in CTA's 
library in the Mart. 



Ahe CTA's Anthon Memorial 
Library in Room 779 in the Merchan- 
dise Mart is a little library with many 
big libraries inside -- thanks to its com- 
puter terminal and printer. 

Through its terminal, connected to 
the Online Computer Library Center 
(OCLC) in Dublin, Ohio, the CTA 
library staff has at its fingertips the vast 
collections of the Library of Congress, 
major university libraries, and public 
and special libraries in America and 
abroad. The OCLC operates an inter- 
national computer network for 
member libraries. 

"CTA's library is part of a library 
cluster," explained Ms. Lillian D. 
Culbertson, superintendent. Library 
Services. "Our cluster is composed of 
small, special libraries needing the 
capability of the computer terminal 
and printer we have here, because 
they are unable to afford the equip- 
ment costs individually At present, 
there are nine libraries using the com- 
puter terminal on a time sharing 
basis." 



Joseph Benson, recently retired 
CTA director of Information Services, 
developed the concept of resource 
sharing among the special libraries 
which led to the installation of the 
computer terminal and printer in 
1976. Back then the cluster numbered 
three participating libraries. 

"Each of the participants have their 
own identification codes with the 
system and each is billed directly by 
OCLC. That avoids potential time 
consuming bookkeeping problems for 
CTA. The CTA's library staff super- 
vises scheduling terminal time with the 
other participating libraries," Ms. 
Culbertson said. 

Besides Ms. Culbertson, the CTA 
library is staffed by Ms. Violette 
Brooks, reference librarian, Ms. Ruth 
Beutler, principal library assistant, and 
Ms. Mary Mcintosh, clerk. 

"Small specialized library staffs, 
such as ours, could be overwhelmed 
by manual cataloging and indexing of 
new materials," Ms. Culbertson said. 
"This automated system does much of 
this work for us." Cta 



From the Chairman 
A most 
significant role 

A he cold weather, snow, and other 
inconveniences of winter are finally 
behind us. and 1 congratulate all CTA 
employees for establishing another 
commendable winter safety record 
while providing reliable transportation 
for the people of Chicago. 

As our thoughts turn to warm 
weather, outdoor recreational ac- 
tivities, and summer vacations, we 
must realize that spring and summer 
bring their own unique challenges to 
the transportation environment. Just 
as the weather presented the greatest 
challenge during the winter months, 
the public will present the greatest 
challenge during the summer months. 
To meet these challenges, you must 
continue to concentrate on job perfor- 
mance and courteous treatment of the 
riding public. 

Tourists and Chicagoans alike will 
be making unfamiliar journeys as they 
ride CTA to sporting events, concerts, 
and festivals. The courtesy and com- 
petence that you demonstrate can 
help increase ridership by showing 
people that we provide total transpor- 
tation, not jut a means to commute to 
work. 

Defensive driving and attention to 
detail is also just as important during 
the summer as it is during the winter. 
As the weather warms, the calm 
streets will suddenly become filled with 
sightseers, children, bicycles, motor- 
cycles, and additional automobile traf- 
fic, and the increased activity will re- 
quire your utmost attention to safe 
operations. 

By providing a public service that 
operates throughout the city, touching 
the lives of millions of people, you 
play a significant role in improving 
CTA's image, increasing ridership, 
and improving the quality of life and 
enjoyment of summer in the City of 
Chicago. Let's do our best and have a 
great summer. 



*m 



L^5*2. 



jt^a. 



Transit News is published for employees and retirees of CTA • Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Department, Bill 
Baxa, Manager • Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin; Editor: Rick Willis • Graphic Designers: A. V. Eiva and Alan Grady • 
Contributing Writers: Jeff Stern, Don Yabush • Typesetting and printing provided by the Management Services Department • 
Distributed free of charge to all active and retired CTA employees • Annual subscription price to others, $5 • CTA TRANSIT 
NEWS, Room 734, Merchandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, IL 60654. 






1985 Vol. 38 — No. 4 




Corner 



Pedro Santiago (North Park 
garage) was appreciated by 
Leona McCandless, of 
Mundelein, for his courtesy on 
a No. 151 Sheridan bus. 
"Leaving Union Station and 
waiting in the cold for the 
bus, all thought of discomfort 
was left behind when I was 
greeted by a smile from No. 
6744. An older lady was hav- 
ing trouble getting her 
change, and the compassion 
he showed trying to calm her 
down was remarkable. Any 
and all questions were 
answered in a very courteous 
manner. I do not go into 
Chicago very often, and hear- 
ing so many nasty remarks, it 
was a real pleasure riding 
with this gentleman. I thanked 
him as I left and got another 
big smile." 



Otis Hampton (Limits garage) was called "a very effi- 
cient and most courteous" operator of a No. 157 
Streeterville bus by Lee McGrath, of DeWitt Place. 
"When I boarded the bus at the beginning of the line, he 
was busy cleaning up all the debris that careless 
passengers had left behind. He made several trips to 
gather up the mess, packed it very carefully, and dis- 
posed of it in a basket next to his seat. When we arrived 
at Lake Street, the light changed to red. He picked up the 
mess very carefully and dropped it into a city basket 
without leaving the bus, and was ready to go when the 
light changed to green. I was very impressed." 

Robert Bell Jr. (North Section) was complimented for 
his performance as conductor on an Evanston Express 
train by Linda Yates, who works in the Daley Center. 
"He clearly calls all stops, giving vital information, such as 
'Clark and Lake, change here for the Lake-Dan Ryan, 
City Hall, the Daley Center,' etc. He also points out that 
his train is an 'Evanston Express, not Dan Ryan.' He has 
a clear, concise speaking voice, and was most courteous 
when asked for directions. It is truly a pleasure to ride on 
his train. I would like him to know that his efforts to be 
pleasant, helpful and considerate are noticed." 



Theodore Lamb (North Park garage) was praised for 
the way he handled a No. 36 Broadway bus by Lee 
Channing, of Lima, Ohio. "Since I'm from an essentially 
rural community, it's a pure joy for me to encounter the 
better parts of such a big city as Chicago. The courtesy 
extended to me by this driver was above and beyond the 
call. I was able to relax and enjoy the sights. I was not 
alone in the receipt of assistance, as I watched and listen- 
ed as he aided many other passengers along the route. 
Chicago has every right to be proud of its transportation, 
and the CTA is to be congratulated for its fine employees 
as well." 



Anthony Ceriale (Forest Glen 
garage) was thanked by Ann 
Gray, of Buena Avenue, for 
his helpfulness as operator of 
a No. 80 Irving Park bus. "I 
was going to have my hair 
styled, but I also was plan- 
ning to go on a trip, and had 
not yet used the 'L'! It was 
always the No. 81 to Jefferson 
Park, and then the O'Hare 
bus. This driver took the time 
to show me where to get off 
as we passed the 'L' line, and 
tell me wher^ the train would 
terminate, and even the direc- 
tion I'd need to go to get to 
the right air terminal. He was 
very kind to several elderly 
ladies. It was nice to have rid- 
den with him." 



Paul Franks (77th Street garage) was commended by 
William Bilal, of Cyril Avenue, who was a rider on his 
79th Street bus. "He was a very skillful and well-trained 
bus driver. I could see that he was keeping to his schedule 
and not wasting time. Even under pressure, he was very 
calm, thoughtful, pleasant and patient with every rider. 
His tone of voice was gentle to the women and men 
alike. He was tolerant and understanding with the teen- 
aged students. Yet, when troublemakers got on the bus, 
he was firm and convincing enough to command their 
respect. There was peace and order on his bus. and I en- 
joyed riding it." 

Tuesday Simpson (Limits garage) caught the attention 
of Joseph Cleary, of Forest Park, for the way she 
operated a No. 36 Broadway bus. "She was so pleasant 
and nice to me, she even explained how much time I had 
left on my senior transfer. During the trip, a young man 
got on and asked a question, and again she was cheerful 
in answering. A grouchy senior citizen with a walker 
boarded the bus, and a person in the front gave his seat 
to the man. Again the driver was nice during the time it 
took the man to get seated. When he got off, the driver 
was so nice, she pulled up even with the curb and told 
him to take his time." 



John Christner (Forest Glen garage) was the operator 
of a No. 80 Irving Park bus ridden by Dena Lustro, of 
Northlake. "A man had gotten on the bus and quickly 
showed his pass. Just because the driver asked the man 
politely to see his pass again, the man became very rude. 
This driver doesn't deserve such disrespect. He knows his 
job. He has a smile and a greeting for everyone. He gives 
accurate, easy-to-follow directions, gets close to the curbs 
on stops, and always calls the stops in a loud and clear 
tone. He waits for buses at cross lines, and even waits for 
people running to catch the bus." eta 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Three bus operators are honored 

for 



Three northside bus operators 
received special recognition on "A 
Day in CTA" for performing rescue ef- 
forts in three separate near-tragic in- 
cidents. 

Operator Egnechles Brown of Ked- 
zie garage earned the special thanks of 
his supervisors, CTA Chairman 
Michael A. Cardilli, and officials of the 
Village of Berwyn when he and a rider 
aboard his early morning 25-West 
Cermak bus rescued an elderly couple 
from a burning building, and alerted 
other building residents. The fire was 
discovered as Brown drove along Cer- 
mak in the 6800 block. 

After notifying the CTA Control 
Center, the veteran bus operator and 
lis passenger rushed to the building 



rescue 
efforts 

where they entered a hall door leading 
to the second floor and began knock- 
ing on doors. The elderly man and his 
wife were in one apartment and need- 
ed help to escape from the building, 
which Brown and the rider provided. 
In a similar incident, operator 
Thomas Bonner of North Park garage 
stopped to lend aid to a motorist in 
trouble which no doubt was a life sav- 
ing fete. Bonner was enroute to work 
in his private automobile on Interstate 



55 near Damen avenue when he en- 
countered a truck which had jack- 
knifed and was hanging over the 
guard rail. 

Bonner stopped his car and assisted 
the driver of the disabled truck out of 
the cab. CTA Operations supervisors 
called Bonner's action "an exceptional 
deed of personal involvement and 
concern for others." 

Operator Robert Dickens of North 
Avenue garage earned the special at- 
tention of his supervisors after he in- 
tervened in an altercation between two 
riders on board his bus. 

After alerting police. Dickens, a bus 
operator since July 1969, disregarded 
his own safety and demonstrated a 
concern for the safety of his riders by 
disarming a knife-wielding passenger 
and detaining her until police arrived. 




Bus operators Egnechles Brown, Thomas Bonner, and Robert Dickens (from left) 
display certificates of achievement presented to them in special recognition as "Day in CTA' 



honorees. 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 4 



Beverly, 




A Maintenance day foreman Earl Jones 
fright), 77th Street garage, accepts a first 
place ZAP certificate from unit supervisor 
^ Walter Bailey. 

Beverly maintenance crews on both day 
and night shifts were treated to a lun- 
cheon feast in recognition of their safety 
conscientiousness which resulted in per- 
sonnel experiencing no accidents for the 
last six month of 1984. 





Claude Stevens (left), Safety Inspections 
and Investigations, presents the coveted 
first place ZAP certificate to 61st Street 
terminal day foreman Charlie Nevels in 
recognition of terminal personnel safety 
achievements during the fourth quarter. 



Car repairer Juanita Eden of first place 
ZAP certificate winner Kimball terminal 
fills the repair order for this rail car elec- 
tric coupler cover. w 




ail maintenance personnel at 54th 
Street terminal earned the Engineering 
and Maintenance Safety department's 
Zero Accident Program catered lunch 
for remaining accident-free during the 
period of July 1 through December 
31, 1984. 

Maintenance crews at Beverly 
garage also sat down to enjoy the lun- 
cheon feast which was sponsored by 
Maintenance Safety for similar 
achievements at the garage level. 

Maintenance Safety supervisor Jim 
Dudley said the catered luncheon is 
awarded to any of the garage or ter- 
minal maintenance teams with a 
record of six months without any ac- 
cidents by personnel, or for having the 
lowest overall accident frequency. 

Meanwhile, first place honors for 
maintenance safety in the fourth 
quarter were taken by respective 
southsider rivals at 77th Street garage, 
as well as Kimball and 61st/Racine 
terminals. 

Dudley said that in rail competition, 
Kimball closed out the quarter with no 
accidents, followed by 6 1st /Racine 
with the next lowest frequency rate. 
Rosemont terminal placed second in 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



54th terminal safety awards feast 




the overall terminal competition. 

In the Bus and Rail Shops areas, 
only those work locations having no 
accidents at all during the quarter are 
eligible for ZAP awards, according to 
Dudley. 

Maintenance safety leaders among 
work locations at Bus Shops are the 
Print, Upholstery, Electrical Units 
Rebuild, and Machine shops, all with 
more than a year of accident-free per- 
formance. 

Other Bus Shops work locations 
which have been accident-free for at 
least six months are the Paint and 
Radiator shops. Operating for three 
months without an accident among its 
personnel are the Convertor and 
Engine Rebuild shops. 

At Skokie Rail shops, both the 
Blacksmith/Welding and Machine 
shops have been accident-free for the 
past year. The Axle and Sub-Electrical 
shops have experienced no accidents 
among personnel for nine months. 

Personnel in the Sub-Mechanical, 
Degreasing, and Paint shops have had 
no accidents in six months, while both 
the Vehicle Wiring and Truck shops 
have reported no accidents for three 
months. Cta 



Foremen from Skokie Rail Shops proudly display first place ZAP certificates from their 
respective departments. They are (from left) front row: Robert Velinske. 
Axle Shop; Frank Porcaro, Sub-Mechanical; Muzio Ficarella, Sub-Electrical; and Ken 
Blocker, Blacksmith/Welding. In the back row are: Pat Langosch, Machine Shop; Pat 
Harnett, Vehicle Wiring; Marty Venticinque, Truck Shop; Frank Vukovics, unit supervisor; 
James House, Degreasing; George Haenisch, superintendent; Jan Broda, PaintShop, and 
Matthew Spatzek, unit supervisor. 



Inspecting the traction motor on this rail 
car at 54th Street terminal where 
maintenance crews also earned a catered 
lunch are car repairers Dan Keller (left), 
and George Fend. 




Ed Lafferty, car repairer, gives special at- 
tention to the tires of this bus at Beverly 
garage, winner of the catered lunch. 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 4 




Fifty-five 
complete intensive 
bus supervisor course 



.Fifty-five members of the March 13 
bus supervisors graduating class, one 
of the largest in the CTA's history, 
received their certificates in 
ceremonies in the CTA Board Room. 
The bus operators had completed 



an intensive program of 12 days of 
classroom training plus six days of field 
training — all done on their days off — 
by the Operations Division bus training 
staff. 

Harry Reddrick, deputy executive 
director, Operations Division, praised 
the graduates for their diligence, 



dedication, and hard work. Reddrick 
shook hands and presented the 
graduates their certificates. 

Paul Kadowaki, director of Instruc- 
tion, said this class had received a 
more intensive training program than 
any previous classes. 

"Greater emphasis was put on trou- 
ble shooting bus electrical and 
mechanical problems so these new 
supervisors, and future supervisory 
graduates, will help keep more buses 
in service and increase the CTA's ser- 
vice to its more than 600,000 bus 
riders," Kadowaki said. 

"Besides learning all the facets of 
supervision, these graduates had to 
learn a broadened coverage of skills in 
such areas as anxiety and stress 
management for supervisors and bus 
operators in problem solving applica- 
tions. 

"They also studied human 
behavior, motivation, and labor- 




er TRANSIT NEWS 



management relations. They are the 
new breed of supervisors and they are 
in the forefront of those to come after 
them. They also had to maintain test 
grades of above 80 per cent in order to 
stay in the program," Kadowaki con- 
cluded. 

The 55 bus operators certified as 
supervisors and their work locations 
are: Archer— Willie Allen, Richard 
True, August Elke, Ina Tuff, Vic- 
tor Gonzalez, and Earleen Raynor; 
Beverly — Charles Taylor, James 
Butler Jr., Cedric Crosbie, James 
Miller, and Conley Johnson Sr.; 
Forest Glen — Patrick Corcione, 
Roy Pickarts, Pedro Espinoza, 
Clarence Golden, Christine 
Jones, Hagar McFarland, and 
Thelma Young; Limits — Phillip 
Benford, Luther Williams, Daniel 
Rogers, and William McDonald 
Jr.; North Avenue — Lawrence 
Chatman, Booker Bolton, Joe 



Ellis, and Carlos Davila; North 
Park-William Jack, Harold 
Gutierrez, and Craig Pease; 
Washington — Henry Terry, Bobby 
Hobbs, Frank Drewry, Michael 
Doss, and Melvin Perry; 69th — 
John Odom, Isaac Dean, Sam 
Shipp, Paul Daniel, Clarence 
Prescott, Claude Dockery, 
William McCotry, Louis 
Williams, Robert Buries, Willie 
Rochelle, Hueylon Steward, 
James Echols, and Harvey White; 
and 77th — Fred Powell, Willie 
McAfee, James Ward, David 
Foster, Willie Morris, Charles 
Carter, Clemmie Bledsoe, and 
Johannie Wheeler. 

Putting the students through their 
training were Training Coordinator 
Pat Mglej and Instructors Arthur 
Bennett, Timothy Graves, John 
McClain, and George 

Zajaczkowski. 



Operations Division executives ex- 
tending their congratulations to the 
class were Manager Elonzo Hill, 
Operations Training & Instruction; 
Michael LaVelle, Transportation 
Service; David Martin, Communica- 
tions and Power Control; Alex 
Johnson, Transportation Personnel; 
Robert Desvignes, Operations Ad- 
ministrative Services, and Lou 
Dixon, director, Transportation Ser- 
vice. 

At the graduation ceremony, Red- 
drick asked the graduates if they 
visited other transit agencies when 
they vacationed in the United States or 
throughout the world. 

Many of them raised their hands. 

"Now you tell me, please, which is 
the best transit agency you have seen 
in your travels — and be truthful," Red- 
drick challenged. 

Their voices rose in unison — 
"CTA!" cta 




1985 Vol. 38 — No. 4 



take honors I 
in PSA contest 




Operating personnel at O'Hare ter- 
minal are among CTA's most 
celebrated safety conscious 
employees. The terminal collected its 
16th Public Safety award in the fourth 
quarter. 

O'Hare experienced no traffic ac- 
cidents in the fourth quarter, and had 
a passenger accident frequency rate of 
0.160 per 100,000 miles of operation, 
48 percent better than the system rate 
of 0.310. 

Meanwhile, operating personnel at 
69th Street garage took the PSA in- 
terstation safety plaque for the sixth 
time. The southside garage which ex- 
perienced 24 accident-free days, had 
the best improvement rate in the 
system. 

The first Public Safety awards were 
presented to terminals and garages in 
1961. eta 



The Interstation Safety plaque for Public Safety is presented to O'Hare ter- 
minal Superintendent Dennis Clausen (left) by Safety Manager Tom Boyle. 
Others on hand for the presentation were Maria Elena Quintanar, clerk; 
retiring Instructor Tom Freeman (uniform), and Kimball Superintendent 
Nick Blaino. 




First place honors seem to come naturally for 69th Street personnel as the 
Interstation Safety plaque for the lowest fourth quarter traffic and 
passenger accident rate in the bus system is received at the southside 
location. Present for the occasion were (from left) Ozzie Davis, ATU 241 
representative; Mike McCarthy, principal public safety analyst; Operator 
James Gultry, outstanding employee; Acting Area Superintendent David 
Hinman; Sylvia Caldwell, outstanding employee, and 69th Street 
Superintendent Joseph Steinbach. 



TkmUior a job WELL DONE! 



Employees who have received Com- 
mendations from the public. 



Charles Alexander, 77th Street 
Robert Anderson, Kedzie 

Samuel Baker, Special Services 
Thomas Barry, Forest Glen 
Nikola Blagojevic, Limits 
Thomas Bonner, North Park 
John Brugess, Limits 
Philip Buscemi, Howard/Kimball 

Sergio Candelaria, Limits 
Cornell Canty, Kedzie 
Ethel Carter, 77th Street 
Charles Carter, 77th Street 
Patricia Cobb, North Park 
Rafael Colon, North Park 
Charles Cooke, Howard/Kimball 
Larry Cooper, Howard/Kimball 
David Copeland, Kedzie 
Luke Costanza, Forest Glen 

Frederick Douglas, North Park 
Daniel Dzyacky, North Park 

Fernando Feliciano, Forest Glen 



Jerry Gardner, North Park 
Vicente Gatbunton, Forest Glen 
Nathaniel George, 77th Street 
Fahmi Ghouleh, Limits 
Wallacene Good, Forest Glen 
Geraldine Grocic, West Section 

Robert Hicks, 77th Street 
Marlene Hornsby, North Section 
Lawrence Houghlund, North Park 

Cedric Johnson, Kedzie 
Lon Jones, 69th Street 
Michael Jordan, Limits 

Joe Kent, 77th Street 
Keith Klein, Campaign Area 
Panagiotis Koutsogiannis, Rail 

Carl Lambert, North Park 
Jesus Limas, North Park 
Charles Lindsey, 77th Street 

John Mack Jr., Kedzie 
Tyrone Malloy, North Avenue 



Jesse Marshall Jr., North Park 
James Melton, North Park 
Marceau Mitchell, 77th Street 
Abraham Morgan, North Avenue 
Jeremiah Morris, 77th Street 

Harold Nathan, 77th Street 
Bobbie Neita, 77th Street 
James Nielsen, Archer 
Jorge Noriega, Forest Glen 

Robert Patterson, North Avenue 
Darlene Porter, 77th Street 
Amy Posley, 69th Street 
Michael Powell, Howard/Kimball 
President Puckett, Kedzie 

Miguel Rivera, Jefferson Park 
Jackie Robinson, Beverly 
Toval Rolston, Forest Park 
Alvin Ross Jr., 77th Street 
Veronica Rowell, North Avenue 

Luis Santiago, North Avenue 
Diego Santos-Rios, North Avenue 



Bobbie Smith, North Park 
Howard Spann Jr., Archer 
Charles Spencer, Beverly 
Vytautas Stukelis, Archer 
Carl Suddeth, North Park 

Charles Tabb, North Avenue 
Carlos Tamayo, Forest Glen 
Eugene Taylor, Jefferson Park 
Robert Tirado, North Park 

O. D. Watson, 69th Street 
Willie Webb, Kedzie 
Ricky Wetherspoon, North Park 
Wi/n'e Whisenton, Limits 
Larry Whitehead, Beverly 
Laurence Whitney, Limits 
Leroy Wilson Jr., 77th Street 
John Woods, Agent's District 
Addie Wright, Forest Glen 

Jacques Yezeguielian, North Avenue 

Willie Young, Limits 

Charles Young, Jefferson Park 

Joseph Zukerman, North Park 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE 

The "Silent Killer" 







Prentiss Taylor M.D. 
Medical Director 
Employee Health Service 



A 



N 



ext month (May) is National High 
Blood Pressure Month. High Blood 
Pressure (Hypertension) is a very 
common disease that affects over 30 
million Americans. It affects all types 
of people-- it is more common, 
however, among Black and Hispanic 
Americans. Hypertension is called the 
Silent Killer by preventive medicine 
specialists: Its victims feel well for 
years, until severe internal damage 
suddenly affects them with a stroke, or 
a heart attack, or with shortness of 
breath from malignant hypertension. 
Uncontrolled High Blood Pressure 
causes premature death and disables 
people--often in their 30's, 40's and 
50's. The disabling complications are 
usually strokes, heart attacks, blind- 
ness, and kidney failure leading to 
dialysis (an artificial kidney machine 
dependency.) 

The High Blood Pressure problem is of 
great concern to companies and to 
company doctors, because becoming 
disabled is a loss of productive work 
hours as well as being a great personal 
tragedy for the employee and his or 
her family. The most common way 
that high blood pressure inflicts its 



The CTA Medical Department has 
new doctors on staff, and we are 
proud of our new image. We have 
started several projects aimed at 
improving the health of our 
employees— this is the first in a 
series of articles which will ap- 
pear in Transit News in months 
ahead. 

damage is by causing a constant stress 
on the arteries to the heart, to the 
brain, and to the kidneys. Over several 
years this stress and pressure causes 
the arteries to harden and become brit- 
tle. Blood clots tend to form in nar- 
rowed, hardened arteries; when blood 
flow is cut off to a part of the heart or 
the brain, serious consequences oc- 
cur. 

Hypertension is one of several Risk 
Factors for heart attacks that can be 
made worse or better by an 
individual's lifestyle. Other car- 
diovascular lifestyle risk factors are: 
high cholesterol levels in the blood 
(and in the diet), obesity, diabetes, 
and cigarette smoking. These condi- 
tions tend to interact with one another 
to increase the chances that hardening 
of the arteries will set in at a premature 
age. High Blood Pressure is a life-long 
problem for people who have it. It 
does not go away like a cold or a rash; 
it requires some type of continuous 
treatment. To stop treatment without 
the advice of your doctor is to unleash 



a monster running loose in the sub- 
ways of your body. A train wreck is in- 
evitable, sooner or later. 

Many people's hypertension can be 
controlled without medicine by 
avoiding salty foods, weight reduction, 
and limiting the use of alcoholic 
beverages. Your doctor should be 
consulted frequently, however, to 
make sure that a non-medication ap- 
proach is, indeed, working adequate- 
ly. If you have been on medication for 
this problem for some time and have 
lost faith in your doctor's ability to get it 
under control, a second opinion from 
a qualified specialist may be advisable. 
Our Medical Department has iden- 
tified hypertension specialty clinics at 
several of the university medical 
centers which would be interested in 
serving our employees for second opi- 
nion consultations. Long-term treat- 
ment programs are available through 
them if you desire. 

Some people will need to take one or 
two types of medications each day to 
control this problem. It is important to 
know what you are taking and what 
are the possible side effects. If you 
have further questions about High 
Blood Pressure or other health pro- 
blems, please do not hesitate to get in 
touch with one of our physicians at the 
Medical Department, Room 742. Mer- 
chandise Mart. eta 



to 



deposit is now available 
CTA pensioners 



CTA pensioners may now have 
their retirement checks electronically 
deposited into savings or checking ac- 
counts of their choice, as announced 
by Gregory C. Nagle, secretary, 
Retirement Allowance Committee. 

Pensioners who would prefer hav- 



ing retirement checks electronically 
deposited into a specific bank account 
on the first business day of each month 
should notify the CTA Pension Office 
at 440 North Wells Street, Suite 600. 
Chicago, IL 60610 so that the neces- 
sary forms for this new service may be 



mailed to the retiree immediately. 

Nagle said having retirement checks 
automatically deposited into a bank 
account will eliminate the chance of 
checks being lost or stolen. The 
retiree's bank statement will serve as 
notification of deposit, he added eta 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 4 



11 





AS REPORTED BY EMPLOYEES OF 
THE CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 



MEET YOUR REPORTER 

Great picture, isn't it? 
Ha! Now that you've read 
this far, you have some 
idea of what your reporter 
looks like. Joking aside, 
I'm Michael M. Flores 
and only want to say: 
supervisor, operator, in- 
structor, regardless of your 
job title, "Inside News" is 
about ALL of us, and 
without your help, it 
wouldn't exist! So, 
whenever you have 
something you'd like to 
share, give it to our clerks 
and they'll get it to me. 

North Park 

Tweet, tweet! Yes, that's the sound of spring, but it also 
marks the one-year wedding anniversary of North Park 
operators Rosemary Hoskins Walker (Team Leader #5) 
and hubby Lonnie. Sincerest congratulations to both of you 
lovebirds ... Oops! Belated welcome extended to assistant 
relief superintendent Sal Carbonelli, who also happens to 
be the parent of daughter Kathy, who is graduating from 
Notre Dame High School this year ... 

Nice to see, once again, former operator Lorraine B. 
Hardy, vacation relief clerk. Miss those buses, Lorraine?.. Is 
there a Gremlin living in our coke machine, or just a paper 
cup foul-up? Seems to be a continuing problem--Hint, hint 
. . . Operator Eddie Traylor confirmed the passing of former 
operator Larry Thigpen (69th Street). Larry had plenty of 
friends here at North Park ... Mary Saved!! Charles 
Dunker must have been one welcome sight after Mary 
Wallace found herself "locked in" in the Howard Terminal 
restroom. Charles, you may now take your bows, HaHa!.. 
Being serious, though, operator Victor Medunycia, with 
the help of fellow operators and a passenger who happened 
to be a nurse, provided CPR to a stricken male adult who 
had collapsed at the Howard Terminal. Victor credits learn- 
ing this life-saving technique while he was donating blood 
and learned of the CPR program ... Robert Moskovitz's 
constant visits to the Health Club must be in anticipation of 
running for those diapers. His daughter, Diana, is expec- 
ting another grandchild for him to babysit ... Well, we've 
picked our vacations for the year, so let's enjoy summer's 
good times and remember Defensive Driving when on 
the road. Mike Flores 




77th Street 

Bus operators Jacqueline Luster and Bobby Willis, 

both from 77th, finally tied the knot after six years on 

March 2. Where did Bobby propose? On a bus, of course! 

The new Mrs. Willis has seven years with CTA, and her 

hubby 18 years. A reception will be held in the couple's 

Hazel Crest home on May 11. Congratulations, 

Mr. and Mrs. Willis ... 

Retired bus operators 

Alonzo Pruitt (left) and 

Julius (Red) Martin, 

both formerly of 77th, 

toast Martin's birthday 

March 17 in Los Angeles, 

where they now live within 

a few blocks of each other. 

Editor's Note: There is as 

yet no Inside News 

Reporter representing 77th 

Street Garage. If you 

would like to volunteer as a 

Reporter for this location, 

please contact Rick Willis at ext. 3324 in the Mart. 

North Section (Howard) 

When Arthur Krishan, clerk at Howard Street, returned to 
New Delhi, India, after an absence of nine years, he was 
amazed at the changes. There were more people, more traf- 
fic, and more tall buildings. Arthur had a marvelous time be- 
ing feted by friends and relatives ... Remember, folks, this is 
YOUR column in the Transit News. Let's get the news from 
North Section moving along! 

Josephine Anderson 

Internal Audit 

Ruth LeBron was a very proud mother when her 
daughter, Rachel, who attends Regina Dominican High 
School, was chosen Junior Queen at the school's spring 
dance. Congratulations, Rachel ... Chuck Kameffel is at 
this moment somewhere between Spain and France having 
another wonderful vacation abroad ... Tan and looking 
great describes Andy Andrzejewski after his vacation in 
Florida. We're glad he had a good time, and glad he's back 
... Pat Reed celebrated her 18th wedding anniversary on 
March 9 at the Holiday Inn Mart Plaza for the weekend. Pat 
and her husband, John, also attended the Elk's 11th An- 
nual Dinner Dance while there, which made the weekend 
that much more memorable ... Congratulations to new 
grandpa, Frank Mullen, of Workers' Compensation. His 
son, Jim, and daughter-in-law, Lucy, had a beautiful baby 
boy. Little Ryan Patrick weighed in at 9 pounds 10 
ounces, and made his appearance on March 31 ... Are you 
thinking about going on a cruise? Go talk to someone in 
Capital Development. This Reporter was told it's the Cruise 
Center of the Seventh Floor. John Jones of Capital 
Development just returned from a 7-day cruise, visiting St. 
Thomas, Nassau, and Cay Islands. According to John, if 
you want to be pampered, rested, and fed like a king, take a 
cruise ... Best wishes to Rich Jania on his recent promo- 
tion to supervisor . Joyce Petrich 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Police Liaison 

Our Get Well wishes to to Jim Marshall, Manager. Labor 
Relations, at Westlake Hospital in Melrose Park. At the 
same time, we send our congratulations to Jim and his wife, 

Mary, and son, Duart, on 
Duan's graduation from 
U.S. Marine Corps Basic 
Training on Mary 27 in 
San Diego. CA. Duan is 
currently assigned to Com- 
munications School, 29 
Palms, CA., after which 
he'll be given assignment 
of duty. The ceremonies 
were attended by Jim, 
Mary, and Duan's aunt, 
Sandra Brown, while 
Janise and James, Jim 
and Mary's two other 
children, celebrated at 
home ... Next month I will have photos on two stories con- 
cerning employees and their hobbies. 

Carol Musto 



Materials Management 

Recognize the man behind 
the glasses? Yes, it's John- 
nie Pope, paymaster. He 
spent his vacation in St. 
Petersburg, Florida. John- 
nie sure loves it down 
south Kay Corcoran, 
Treasury, wishes to take 
this opportunity to thank 
all her co-workers for their 
support and kind words of 
sympathy over the death 
of her dear friend, Ralph 
Regnier. Ralph began his 
CTA career as a bus 
operator for CSL. and he 
was chauffeur for Board Chairman George L. DeMent 
when he retired in 1972 ... Louise Muhr, on leave of 
absence, visited her friends in Materials Management proud- 
ly showing off one-year old Baby Meagan . . . Don't forget to 
call or send any Inside News Items to your reporter, Arlene 
Zittman. My extension is GO 4861, Merchandise Mart, 
Room 725 ... We're all so happy to see Jim Madden, 
supervisor, Disbursements & Records, back at his post after 
open-heart surgery. Welcome back, Jim, we surely missed 
you ... Phyllis Shields, payroll clerk, was feted to a 
luncheon in the M&M Club by many of her friends. Phyllis 
and her husband, Vince, who incidentally she met at CTA, 
are retiring to sunny Florida. Good luck, Phyllis and Vince 
... Retirees Jane Mitchell (Garrity), Executive. Wally 
Johnson, Utility, Ann Jobaris, Materials Management. 
Margaret Walker, Accounting, Jean Wright, Accoun- 
ting, Bill Piatt, Job Classification, all send greetings to their 
friends. They also agree there's nothing like retirement. 

Arlene Zittman 





69th Street 

Larry: A Time to Shine — Larry Thigpen, friend and 

former fellow bus operator, 
will shine in our thoughts 
and hearts for some time. 
If anyone had ever come in 
contact with Larry, you 
couldn't forget him. I can't 
say enough about this 
young man who's life end- 
ed on March 8, 1985, at 
the age of 32. Larry was an 
operator out of 69th Street 
until he became ill and was 
unable to work. Larry re- 
quired a heart transplant. 
In an effort to help Larry 
get the open heart surgery 
he so desperately needed, operator Melloneice 
Springfield spearheaded a collection at 69th, which ended 
in the amount of $1,300. A tribute to Larry was made on 
behalf of the 69th Street Station by operator /spokesperson 
Eddie Traylor at the Cedar Park Funeral Home Wednes- 
day evening, March 13, 1985. More than 50 bus operators; 
Local Board members Leonard Morris and Ozie Davis; 
Assistant Superintendents Walter Caston (69th Street) 
and Isaac Clark (77th Street) came to pay last respects. A 
Pallbearers' Honor Guard in CTA uniform, consisting of 
operators Jimmie Gultry (8798), Richard Dunbar 
(13752), William Grimmage (13392), Charles 
Johnson (12131), and Isaiah Taylor Jr. (3445). Unfor- 
tunately we don't have the name of the sixth pallbearer, but 
extend our sincerest thanks to them all. Larry always said, "I 
understand." Now we all have to understand. A special 
thanks to operator Elbert Pearson (6037) for the beautiful 
floral wreath arrangement. 

Condolences are extended to operator Eddie Mae Jones 
in the loss of her grandson. William D. Glasper ... Yours 
Truly enjoyed a swinging good time at co-worker operator 
Mary Haynes' (13394) annual birthday party gala at her 
home March 17. Fellow operator LeDorothy Jones 
dressed to kill in a black and red dress ensemble, which add- 
ed entertainment to the already exciting night. Good food 

and drink rounded the 
festivities off perfectly. I 
can hardly wait till next 
year!.. Congratulations are 
in order for operator Car- 
rie Smith Williams 
(69th) and hubby. Super- 
visor Willie Williams Jr. 
(District A-77th) on the 
birth of a son, Corey 
Dorsett, on Sept. 18. 
1984. Corey weighed in at 
9 pounds at Olympia 
Fields Medical Center ... 
Hey, Aries people! Watch 
the bulletin board for a 
Happy Birthday To You! 

Elite Head eta 




1985 Vol. 38 — No. 4 



13 



RETIREMENTS 




Joseph Benson, Director of Infor 
mation Services, retired April 1, end- 
ing his 10-year career with the CTA at 
age 65. 



Benson was responsible for taking 
the Engineering Department's Anthon 
Memorial Library, a collection of 
manuals and technical books, and 
creating the present broad based 
library, an acknowledge leader among 
public transit libraries in the United 
States. The present library is named 
for Harold S. Anthon who donated 
the original collection. 

Before joining the CTA, Benson 
served as librarian for the Merriam 
Center Library of the Charles E. Mer- 
riam Center for Public Administration 
in Hyde Park. He had previously 
served as librarian of the Chicago 
Municipal Reference Library in City 
Hall. 




Benson and his wife, Martha, plan 
to retire near Buchanan, Mich., where 
they have maintained a second home. 
They had been residents of the Hyde 
Park Community for many years, eta 



\ 




Retiring CTA schedule maker Eugene 
Wrobel (left) plans to remain in 
Chicago and pursue his favorite 
pastime of fishing after 39 years of 
CTA service. On behalf of the entire 
Schedule Section, Director of 
Schedules Norman Oswald (right) 
extends best wishes for a happy retire- 
ment to Wrobel who joined CTA in 
May 1946 as a bus operator. He 
became a traffic checker with the 
Schedule Section in September 1966, 
and was named schedule maker in 
October 1974. A luncheon was held in 
Wrobel's honor at the Holiday Inn 
Mart Plaza last month where co- 
workers presented him with a fishing 
vest. 



Sunny 




Mrs. Phyllis Shields, payroll relief 
clerk, Financial Services department, 
ended her 26-year career with CTA 
on April 1. 

Co-workers and friends, 45 in all, 
attended a farewell luncheon in her 
honor in the M&M Club on March 13. 
John Cannon, superintendent. Ac- 
counting Operations (far right), Brian 
Jakubowski, unit supervisor. Payroll 




(left), and Gerald Kurowski. payroll 
supervisor (right), acted as masters of 
ceremony. 

Mrs. Shields, 49, received a 
microwave oven and a cash gift as 



farewell presents. She and her hus- 
band, Vince, will make their home in 
St. Petersburg, Florida, where they 
plan to enjoy deep sea fishing and 
then put the microwave oven to work. 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



FRANK F. ANDREK, Car Servicer, 

98th Street, Emp. 11-11-46 
DONALD L. BABER, Money Handler I, 

South Shops, Emp. 6-13-57 
JOSEPH BENSON, Director, 

Information Services, Emp. 4-15-74 
'MICHAEL P. CASTIGLIONE, Elec. Mtce. Man, 

South Shops, Emp. 10-9-61 
PEDRO A. CORONADO, Bus Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp. 3-17-58 
DOROTHY M. DISMANG, Ticket Agent, 

West Section, Emp. 3-21-59 
PETER J. FALLEST, Carpenter, 

South Shops, Emp. 3-10-60 
CLEODIS FOSTON. Collector, 

Archer, Emp. 2-16-56 

•Retroactive to 3-1-85 



April Pensioners 



PATRICK F. HEALY, Bus Servicer, 

Archer, Emp. 11-5-52 
ARIE H. ISACK, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp. 1-6-71 
GEORGE M. ISDALE. Serv. Trk. Chauf. 

West Shops, Emp. 5-1-51 
LUTHER B. LEE. Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 10-13-55 
TIMOTHY C. MURPHY, Chief Clerk, 

Beverly, Emp. 8-2-57 
HOUSTON NETTLES, Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 3-14-57 
BARRY A. PIERCY, Bus Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 4-14-55 
MARY T. RAFTERY, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp. 3-24-60 



CLARENCE REESE Jr.. Bus Repairer, 

69th Street, Emp. 12-11-56 
JOHN E. REID. Ticket Agent, 

Forest Park, Emp 8-26-54 
RAYMOND RICHARDSON. Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 11-156 
REGINALD M. SHARP. Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 12-10-53 
PHYLLIS S. SHIELDS. Payroll Rel. Clk., 

Financial Services, Emp. 10-6-58 
YOUNG WALKER Jr.. Bus Operator, 

77th Street, Emp. 3-1-54 
EUGENE A. WROBEL, Schedule Maker, 

Schedules, Emp. 5-17-46 
Disability Retirements 

ADRIAN W. TAYLOR. Motorman, 
Congress, Emp. 6-30-67 



Service Anniversaries in April 



35 Years 



Daniel Allen, 69th Street 
Milford Cumberlander, Utility 
Thaddeus Szewc, Sig. Phone & Radio 



30 Years 



Henry Piercy, North Park 
Earl Williams, Beverly 
John Woodson, North Park 



25 Years 



James Briley, Special Services 
James Haase, Financial Services 
William Hairstone. 77th Street 
Kelsey King, Technical Services 
Carmen Pacella, Adm. & Budget 
James Paulson, Utility 
Paul Schurchay, Elec. Distribution 
Alphonso Young, Forest Glen 



insr :ive:e:m:o:r,i.a.:m: 



ALEXANDER D. ADAMS, 72, Maint., 

Emp. 10-24-55, Died 2-23-85 
WALTER J. BARAN, 75, North Avenue, 

Emp. 6-26-46, Died 2-11-85 
HENRY BARBEE, 72, Track, 

Emp. 8-25-48, Died 2-3-85 
ALBERT W. BELK, 88, Shops & Equip., 

Emp. 7-13-37, Died 2-4-85 
NICK DARGENTO, 88, Way & Structs.. 

Emp. 12-8-23, Died 2-26-85 
HERMAN T. DUKES, 71, South Sect., 

Emp. 3-30-50, Died 2-21-85 
WALTER J. GAUGER, 69, West Sect., 

Emp. 10-29-45, Died 2-11-85 
THADDEUS GUTT, 62, Equip. Engr., & 

Maint., Emp. 9-13-67, Died 2-8-85 
WILLIAM J. HALLA, 73, Lawndale, 

Emp. 6-23-37, Died 2-4-85 
THOMAS L. HENRY, 93, Electrical, 

Emp. 4-18-19, Died 2-15-85 
CORNELIUS J. JONES, 65, South Sect. 

Emp. 2-24-49, Died 2-6-85 
MICHAEL KACZOR, 82, West Sect., 

Emp. 10-29-43. Died 2-26-85 



THOMAS J. LAWLESS, 79, Skokie. 

Emp. 4-22-37, Died 2-4-85 
FRED J. MOHN, 85, Shops & Equip., 

Emp. 3-2-38, Died 1-21-85 
EUGENE J. NEHLS. 93, 77th Street, 

Emp. 9-28-21, Died 1-21-85 
DOROTHY S. PIPER. 88, West Sect., 

Emp. 4-15-34, Died 2-22-85 
RUDOLPH C. SCHULTZ, 90, Lawndale, 

Emp. 2-21-17, Died 2-20-85 
JAMES P. SLEZNIK. 91, Way & Structs . 

Emp. 4-16-41, Died 2-19-85 
EMIL E. STEVENS. 79, 69th Street, 

Emp. 11-1-27, Died 2-8-85 
HENRY O. STUEWE. 85, Shops & Equip., 

Emp. 2-28-17. Died 2-23-85 
JOHN T ALLEY. 79, Kedzie, 

Emp. 10-17-27, Died 2-15-85 
MARSHALL WASHINGTON. 70. 52nd Street, 

Emp. 10-2-51, Died 2-17-85 
ALFRED E. WOELFLE. 89. 69th Street, 

Emp. 1-14-21, Died 1-26-85 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 4 



75 




Award for 



Cross 
Country 

Champ 



Kenwood Academy senior and 
distance runner Gerald L. Thomp- 
son Jr., sprints in a practice warm-up. 
Thompson, 18, runs the two-mile, 
mile, and half-mile events for Ken- 
wood. He is the son of CTA 
duplicating finishing clerk Olivia P. 
Thompson. The youth, who has 
been a cross-country champion for the 
past two seasons, looks forward to the 
1985 State Championship competi- 
tion in downstate Charleston. Calling 
his mother "very encouraging," he 
noted that she has a lot of influence in 
his track and field accomplishments. 
Gerald hopes to earn a degree in 
aeronautical engineering from the 
University of Wisconsin. 




Excellence 



David Sauer (left), project manager 
for Lester B. Knight and Associates 
Architects, and Chris Kalogeras, 

CTA Director of Architectural Design, 
join CTA Chairman Michael A. Car- 

dilli to proudly display the Award of 
Excellence certificate presented CTA 
by the Chicago Chapter, Society of 
American Registered Architects. The 
award, presented to the CTA 
Engineering Department, was for 
design excellence of the 321,000 
square foot Kedzie Avenue garage 
which opened June 29, 1984. CTA 
project manager for the $17.6 million 
facility was Fritz Petzold. Presenta- 
tion of the certificate was made at an 
awards dinner held at Sages West 
Restaurant in Downers Grove. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT NO. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



(^da^io Tva us ctn^o^^ 



wi3 Transit News 



Vol.38, No.5&6, 1985/ For Chicago Transit Authority Employ 



g^s Millionth 



air 




y flare 



(Story on 





CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli greets CTA's 



CTA's "Millionth-air" 
window card was 
posted inside buses, 
trains, and sections. 




CTA's 
Millionth-air 



Ihe stage was set at 3:30 p.m., May 29, at O'Hare 
Terminal. A large, three-dimensional sign proclaiming 
"WINNER — CTA's one-millionth rider from O'Hare" had 
been placed at the top of the escalator leading from the 
fare collection level to the platform level. Staff members 
from the Promotional Services, Communications, and 
Publications sections of the Public Affairs department, and 
news teams from Channel 5, Channel 9, and the Chicago 
Sun-Times, prepared to record the first milestone of 
CTA's O'Hare rapid transit service. 

As the paid-fare count neared one million, Helene 
Greiman, promotional services representative, began 
counting down the last 100 fare-paying riders. Two 
women saw the sign, walked back, and passed through 
the turnstiles a second time — but the countdown con- 
tinued. 

At about 4:13 p.m., a man with two pieces of luggage 
and a large package maneuvered his way through the 
turnstile. He was then greeted by CTA Chairman Michael 
A. Cardilli and proclaimed CTA's one-millionth rider 
from O'Hare. 

Somewhat weary after his flight home from a vacation 
in Israel, Morris Dessau, a retired clerk from the North 
side of Chicago, was at first confused and then surprised. 
Cardilli presented him with a certificate that entitled him 
to two free round-trip coach tickets to any city served by 
United Airlines in the Continental U.S. Dessau also received 
free accommodations for four days and three nights at 
any Hyatt Hotel of his choice, and a souvenir photo of a 



United 747 taking off over a CTA train at the taxiway 
bridge. The airline tickets were furnished jointly by CTA 
and United Airlines, and the hotel accommodations were 
donated by Ronald Schultz of the Travel-Rite travel agency. 

Responding to questions from the media, Dessau said 
that he buys a CTA monthly pass every month, rides 
CTA "almost every day," and that he doesn't mind plac- 
ing his luggage under the train seat. 

Where will Dessau fly with his free tickets? 

"Thank you very much, I will decide later," he said. "I 
just want to get home." 

The Millionth-air compaign was the first promotional ac- 
tivity targeted specifically at the O'Hare service, and it 
highlights the success of the O'Hare line. Original rider- 
ship estimates projected that the one-millionth rider would 
board during July, but a 17.7 percent ridership increase 
since November caused ridership to reach one million on 
May 29. The millionth-rider campaign was promoted 
through news releases, and through economical window 
card advertising in buses, trains, and stations, and other 
graphics designed by Alan Grady of the Publications section. 

Promotional Services Director Terry Hocin is implemen- 
ting additional promotions that will help increase ridership 
on the O'Hare line and other CTA services. A mailing to 
top executives of 6,000 Chicago companies, explaining 
the advantages of riding the CTA for business trips to 
O'Hare, has just been completed, and plans are now be- 
ing made for a celebration of the first aniversary of service 
to O'Hare this September. 






Transit News is published for employees and retirees of CTA • Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Department, Bill 
Baxa, Manager • Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin; Editor: Rick Willis • Graphic Designers: A. V. Elva and Alan Grady • 
Contributing Writers: Terry Hocin, Jeff Stern, Don Yabush • Typesetting and printing provided by the Management Services 
Department • Distributed free of charge to all active and retired CTA employees • Annual subscription price to others, $5 • 
CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Merchandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, I L 60654. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Community Affairs personnel demonstrate their zeal to "Wipe Out Graffiti" as they 
prepare this 'Big Bend' bus for the Chicago Police Department sponsored parade. They 
are (from left) Elda Leal, Ana DelRivero, Carol Kimbrough, Bertram Mims. Betty Edwards, 
manager; Tom Chiampas, John Weatherspoon, special assistant to the CTA chairman; 
Donald Brookins, Dennis Redmond, and Juan Puente. 



The Chicago Transit Authority has 
joined the Police Department and 
other agencies in a war on graffiti. 

The first major public agencies 
cleanliness salvo of 1985, initiated to 
create awareness and focus attention 
on the problem of graffiti, was fired 
May 14. A parade of city agencies led 
by the Chicago Police Department 
band, youth groups, and other 
neighborhood organizations, marched 
down Dearborn Street in the Loop. 

Joining Mayor Harold Washington 
on a reviewing stand at the Richard J. 
Daley Civic Center Plaza were CTA 
Chairman Michael A. Cardilli, Police 
Superintendent Fred Rice, and other 
city officials and department heads. 

Youth groups which included police 
explorers, other neighborhood scouts, 
and high school bands, drew the 
praises of Mayor Washington as the 
youth demonstrated concern for the 
need to "Wipe Out Graffiti"-CTA's 
parade theme-and keep Chicago 
clean. "We should exercise every 
endeavor to keep our city clean," the 
mayor said as he praised the youth for 
their participation. 

On-lookers were urged to call 
744-5000, the city-wide number to be 
used for requesting help with cleanup 
problems. 

CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 
said placards and flyers distributed by 



CTA's Community Affairs department 
were especially designed to keep 
employees and the community aware 
of the graffiti problem. 

Police Superintendent Fred Rice 
said that efforts to increase awareness 
among community groups and city 
agencies of the growing graffiti pro- 
blem will go a long way toward 
reaching the goals of the joint city- 
wide effort to combat this problem. 

Tom Wolgemuth, manager, 
Facilities Engineering and 
Maintenance, said, "On Monday and 
Tuesday of this week, CTA paid its 
janitors and painters some $1,500 for 
approximately 80 man hours of labor 
to clean up graffiti in only one CTA 
facility, the Grand and Milwaukee 
Avenue subway station." 

During the parade, personnel of the 
CTA Community Affairs department 
and other employees donned T-shirts 
emblazoned with the CTA slogan, 
"Wipe Out Graffiti." The shirts were 
purchased by individuals of the Com- 
munity Affairs staff. 

"Wipe Out Graffiti" was the joint ef- 
fort of the Community Affairs depart- 
ment and the Publications section of 
the Public Affairs department. Special 
thanks to North Park garage per- 
sonnel for their cooperation and 
preparation of bus No. 7100, which 
carried CTA's "Wipe Out Graffiti" ban- 
ner in the parade. 



From the Chairman 



Selling service 

The recent celebration honoring our 
one millionth rider boarding at O'Hare 
is more than a significant statistical 
milestone, because a 17.7 per cent 
ridership increase on the O'Hare line 
since November enabled us to reach 
this goal two months earlier than 
originally projected. This proves that 
the planning, engineering, and hard 
work that created the O'Hare Exten- 
sion have been a worthwhile invest- 
ment in Chicago's future. Most impor- 
tantly, it demonstrates that transit ser- 
vice, responsive to the needs of the 
riding public, can grow and prosper in 
Chicago and other large cities. 

We are. therefore, more actively 
promoting the specialized programs 
that make CTA service more attractive 
and easier to use. We will continue to 
promote O'Hare ridership; we have 
increased promotion of monthly pass 
sales through employers as well as in- 
dividual monthly pass sales, and we 
expect to begin implementing the elec- 
tronic dollar-bill-accepting farebox 
throughout the system after the test 
program at Beverly Garage has been 
completed. Our planners are studying 
alternative designs for bus doors and 
interior seating arrangements, which 
will allow quicker boarding, passenger 
flow, and alighting that will shorten 
waiting time at bus stops. We are also 
beginning to work with the police 
department, the school system, and 
other agencies to combat the tremen- 
dous increase in graffiti that is 
degrading the transit environment. 

No matter how extensively we work 
on a management level to make transit 
riding a more pleasurable and worth- 
while experience, we need everyone's 
help to sell CTA service. The most im- 
portant means of promoting our ser- 
vice and creating good will is our day- 
to-day contact with the riding public. 
All employees must make every effort 
to treat the public courteously, and all 
operating employees must be 
knowledgeable about their own routes 
and other connecting services, and 
willing to patiently direct riders and 
answer questions about CTA service. 



i-^LX£j 




1985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



DAN a PP° inted 

, r ^ r ^ r ^ T , finance 
\PERK deputy 




new rail service 
supervisors 
join ranks 




.s\ 



ASM 



Llaniel R. Perk, a career 
CTA employee of 35 years ser- 
vice, has been appointed Deputy 
Executive Director of Finance 
filling the vacancy left by the 
retirement of Paul J. Kole. The 
appointment was effective April 1. 

Perk is the former CTA 
Treasury manager. He also serv- 
ed for 12 years as assistant 
treasurer, and was director of 
Claims and Investigation Ad- 
ministration. 

He is a graduate of Loyola 
University where he earned 
bachelor and masters degrees in 
business administration. Perk 
and his wife Joan, and their two 
sons reside in Evergreen Park. 



Promotions 

Arthur Bennett 

Asst Supt., Training Center 
Ulysee Coley II 

Supt. Ill, Transportation Personnel 

(North) 
Richard Jania 

Supt., Budget and Manpower 
Robert Julun 

Supt., HI, Transportation Personnel 

(South) 
Dennis H. Ryan 

Acting Director, Routes & Systems 

Planning 
Samuel W. Smith Jr. 

Supt., Ill, Transportation Personnel 

(Bus North) 




Seventeen new rail service supervisors show 
following a graduation which was held in the 
Merchandise Mart on April 24. The occasion 
the graduates. 

"I 

I'm surprised!" was all John Zupko, 

Jr. could say when informed that he 
had finished number one out of 17 rail 
employees graduating with the April 
24 Rail Service Supervisors class. 

Zupko, a conductor from Kimball 
terminal who also finished on the first 
place crew in the 1984 Third Rail 
Roundup, was one of three 1984 
Third Rail Roundup Roundhouse 18 
participants to graduate with the Rail 
Service Supervisors class. Others were 
motorman Donald Seay, Howard 
street, and conductor San Juana M. 
Montes de Oca, also of Kimball ter- 
minal. 

The graduation was held in the 
Operations conference room at the 
Merchandise Mart. Spouses, other 
relatives and friends of the graduates 
were on hand for the occasion which 
marked the culmination of 120 hours 
of formal training and 56 hours of field 
instruction. 

Elonzo Hill, manager, Train- 
ing/Instruction, told the class, "This is 
just the beginning of your learning. 
Always stay current. Your job as a 
supervisor is to help make the trains 
run better— to provide a better service 
to the public. 



off their certificates of achievement 
Operations conference room at the 
was attended by relatives and friends of 



"You have done an outstanding job 
and you are to be congratulated for 
your accomplishments. You are the 
cream of the crop," said Hill. 

Michael LaVelle, director of Ser 
vice, also congratulated those wives of 
graduates who were in attendance. 
"To have an understanding spouse is 
very important to this job," said 
LaVelle. "It's very difficult otherwise, 
because this is a seven day a week job, 
requiring many hours of your time 
away from your families." 

LaVelle also told graduates the cost 
for putting each employee through the 
training which they had received is ap- 
proximately $10,000. "We want you 
to do your very best and we know you 
will because you are the cream of the 
crop," he said. 

Other members of the class were: 
Alan Carter, William Demitro, 
and Greffen Harrington, O'Hare 
terminal; Andrew Robinson, Diane 
Overstreet, Travis Newsome, and 
Linda Ray, Howard terminal; Clif- 
ton Satterfield, Ronald Heard, 
and Richard Newton, 61st Street 
terminal; Willie Taylor, Allen 
McFalls, and Eric Minor, Ashland 
terminal, and Michael Kennedy, 
95th Street terminal. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



MEDICAL 
SECTION 

seeks new 
approaches to 
health problems 



CTA Medical section staff includes 
(from left) Dr. Tanya Jones, family 
practice; Dr. Joseph Hinkamp, 
surgical and sports medicine; Kay 
Smith, medical technician; Erlinda 
Lapid and Mary Ledwith, registered 
nurses; Dr. Ilia Roman, general prac- 
tioner; Medical Director Dr. Prentiss 
Taylor, occupational medicine inter- 
nist, and Dr. Irma Realisa, internist. 




1 he CTA Medical section is current- 
ly developing new approaches to the 
problems of employee health. 
In the past the trend for most in- 




Mary Ledwith, RN, conducts a visual test 
for a CTA employment applicant. Ms.Led- 
with also assists physicians in providing 
emergency treatment. 

dustrial medical staffs was to focus 
only on the evaluation and treatment 
of accidents and sickness. Today, 
however, occupational health is seen 
as a branch of the field of preventive 
medicine which aims to prevent ill- 



nesses before they have a chance to 
cause damage. 

Many of the most devasting 
chronic illnesses are caused by 
lifestyle habits such as smoking, the 
lack of exercise, excessive eating 
which leads to overweight, high 
cholesterol-high foods, and excessive 
drinking. Health analysts call these 
"risk factors" which increase the 
chance of premature death or 
disability. 

"Our medical staff is providing 
educational opportunities and refer- 
rals to agencies which could help our 
employees deal with potential health 
problems," said Dr. Prentiss Taylor, 
medical director, occupational 
medicine internist. 

Others on the CTA medical staff 
are Dr. Ilia Roman, general prac- 
tioner; Dr. Irma Realisa, internist; Dr. 
Tanya Jones, family practice, and 
Dr. Joseph Hinkamp, surgical and 
sports medicine. 

CTA physicians are assisted by 
Registered Nurses Erlinda Lapid. and 
Mary Ledwith, and Medical Techni- 
cian Kay Smith. Counselors Michael 
Stroden and Beverly Jackson of the 
Employee Assistance Program also 
work closely with the medical staff to 
aid employees and family members 
who wish help with alcohol and drug 
abuse, or emotional problems. 



In addition, Dr. Taylor said the 
American Heart Association has asked 
the CTA Medical section as an 
employee health service, to join its 
"Heart-at-Work program" which is 
aimed at preventing heart disease 
through educational programs of- 
fered at the work site. The CTA 
medical director says he is currently 
working with local medical colleges in 
evaluating the "Heart-at-Work" pro- 
gram's potential for CTA. 




An employment applicant sits in a sound- 
proof booth while Kay Smith, medical 
technician, conducts an audio test 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



gl# #%■#■■■ blacksmith welders proud 
i9IWI%IE of shop safety record 




B 



Blacksmith welders at Skokie Shops pause to receive a moment of recognition for 

the outstanding safety record the crew has sustained for nearly 18 months. Workers 

include (top left) Jerry Hornung, George Haenisch, superintendent; Elmer Fischer, 

Michael Fabian, Ceasar Flores, and Mike Healy. Others are Foreman Ken Blocker 

(hammer), Mark Bianchini, Rodrigo Silva, and Jung Kim. 



For rider convenience 

CTA Chairman Michael Cardilli and Eugene Mroz, 
Chairman of the Board, Gladstone-Norwood Trust 
and Savings Bank, cut a ribbon on May 22 officially 
opening the new 24-hour teller facilities of the 
Money Network System, located along Milwaukee 
Avenue on CTA property at Jefferson Park Terminal. 
Joining in the celebration of this new convenience 
for CTA riders and Gladstone-Norwood customers 
are (from left) Kenneth Fox, President, Gladstone- 
Norwood Trust and Savings Bank; Aurelia Pucinski, 
Commissioner, Metropolitan Sanitary District, and 
Rev. John Kuzinskas, Pastor, Our Lady of Victory 
Church. 



acksmith welding shop 
employees at Skokie are justifiably 
proud of their maintenance safety 
record, but they are not resting on 
their laurels. 

Safety records indicate that the last 
maintenance accident in the 14-man 
shop was June 15, 1983 which means 
blacksmith welding workers have en- 
joyed nearly 18 months without a 
mishap. 

In recognition of their safety 
accomplishments, shop employees 
pooled three gift certificates, each for 
$25, and purchased 30 pounds of 
ribs, donated a variety of other food 
items, and treated themselves to a 
much deserved luncheon. 

Besides the ribs, the menu included 
German potato salad, guacamole, piz- 
za rolls, bread rolls, potato chips, and 
pop. The food was prepared by the 
wives of Rodrigo Silva, foreman Ken 
Blocker, Elmer Fischer, and Michael 
Fabian. 

Jim Dudley, industrial safety super- 
visor, Engineering and Maintenance, 
called the pooling of the gift certificates 
"real teamwork." Dudley said that $25 
gift certificates are raffled when a shop 
has not had an accident for at least 12 
months. "Although everybody could 
not win a certificate, everybody 
benefited from the certificates that 
were won," said Dudley. 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



1 he emergence of civilized man 
was the result of many factors, most 
notably the control and use of fire, 
development of simple hand tools, 
invention of the wheel and develop- 
ment of the internal combustion 
engine. 

The internal combustion engine, 
the wheel and other mechanical do- 
dads resulted in cars, trains, buses 
and most importantly, the motor- 
cycle. After the development of the 
motorcycle came the creation of an 
image problem 



learn how to safely, skillfully, and 
knowledgeably ride a motorcycle. 
The course is offered at nine area 
colleges throughout the riding 
season. The training, which includes 
12 hours of on-cycle and 8 hours of 
classroom instruction, is definitely not 
a cupcake course. Motorcycles and 
helmets are provided. 

Students need only bring the pro- 
per protective clothing, a valid Illinois 
drivers license or permit, and the 



"countersteering." 

In addition to the basic Motorcycle 
Rider course, the Experienced Rider 
course, a one-day refresher which 
allows the experienced but rusty rider 
a chance to tune up skills, is also of- 
fered. If you want to learn about 
sidecars, touring, or mo-peds, special 
classes on these subjects are also of- 
fered. 



is fun anu — 



but 



• ■■• 



■S22*. 



i°£» 



through a mass 
hysteria which was prompted by the 
grade B movie motorcycle gang 
steroeotypes--unbathed, unshaven 
bikers drinking gallons of warm beer 
while terrorizing small towns in 
Indiana. 

This image has softened somewhat 
in recent years. The advent of inex- 
pensive but reliable machines has 
caused the motorcycling community 
to mushroom. Men and women, 
young and old, of all professions 
from executive to blue collar and 
homemaker to student, have 
discovered the pleasures of two- 
wheeled motoring. Motorcycling is a 
little bit different for everyone, run- 
ning from the basic allure of anything 
forbidden, to the Zen-like peace that 
evolves between man. machine and 
the open highway. 

Besides image there is another 
basic problem with motor- 
cycling—when you fall off it hurts. 
There are many reasons for 
motorcycle-related injuries; the 
greatest, perhaps, is the lack of train- 
ing. 

Illinoisans are fortunate, however, to 
have some of the best training 
available anywhere, and its FREE 

The Motorcycle Rider course is 
available to anyone who wants to 



\ •' • 



</■■■- 



ability to ride a bicycle. 

Being an experienced 
operator of a motorcycle 
is not necessary. Suc- 
cessful completion of 
the Motorcycle Rider 
course is said to 
give beginners the 
equivalent of five 
years riding ex- 
perience. It may 
also mean an in- 
surance discount. 

Students who :::: - : 

are 16 or 17 years 
old will receive a completion card 
permitting them to test at any 
Secretary of State licensing facility for 
an 'M' classification on their drivers 
license (over 150cc engine displace- 
ment). The course will not provide a 
license examination or a motorcycle 
to take the license examination. 

Classes are kept small to allow for 
individual student attention. Topics 
include basic controls and their 
operation, defensive driving, 
maintenance, and how to select a 
motorcycle. All on-cycle instruction is 
conducted on a secure off-street 
area. Everyone walks the bike at first 
then proceeds to brake and clutch 
operation, slow riding, turns, and an 
evasive maneuver called 






An average Motorcycle Rider 
course class consists of 40 percent 
women and 60 percent men who 
range in age from 16 years old to 
senior citizen. Everyone comes to 
have fun. so you needn't hesitate to 
enroll. 

Locations, schedules and enroll- 
ment information is available by 
writing Motorcycle Safety Program. 
Northeastern Illinois University, 5500 
N. St. Louis Av., Chicago. IL 
60625. or you may call 583-4050 



7985 Vol. 38— No. 5 & 6 



\Commendation Cornen 




Felicia Clower (Limits 
garage) was regarded as 
"exceptional" by A. 
Reichel, of Melrose Street, 
who rode her No. 151 
Sheridan bus. "She was 
the most courteous driver 
I've ever seen on a bus in 
over 26 years. She was 
always smiling, and 
answered all questions in a 
very pleasant manner. 
Three or tour tourists got 
on and asked her for direc- 
tions, which were given so 
well the people would have 
no difficulty arriving at 
their destinations. Her 
directions were so precise, 
the folks didn't ask any ad- 
ditional questions. I just 
had to let you know what a 
remarkable individual you 
have in driver #9419. " 



Joe Horace (77th Street garage) is "great" according to 
J. Merrill, of King Drive, who was a rider on his No. 4 
Cottage Grove bus. ''His concern is always for the safety 
of his passengers. He sweeps out his bus, cleans his win- 
dows. He gives directions and lends assistance when 
necessary. 'Watch your step' and 'Have a nice evening' 
are just a few of the kind words he gives that make your 
day. His personality, attitude and smile help to promote 
the motto 'Chicago — a city that cares.' I take my hat off 
to operator #6436." 

Josephine Anderson (North Section) was the ticket 
agent at Western Avenue station on the Ravenswood 
route who helped Alfredo Valentin, of Eastwood 
Avenue , retrieve the briefcase he left at the station . "I was 
paying attention to the train that was coming, and I totally 
forgot about my briefcase. It wasn't until after the train 
started to move that I thought about it, and as soon as I 
got off at Rockwell, I ran to a telephone. I was transferred 
to a gentle lady in Central Operations. That lady called 
the Western station, and another lady (Agent #1434) 
went upstairs and got my briefcase. A minute later the 
southbound train was coming and I got on. When I got 
off, 1 looked over at the other side of the platform, and 
there was the lady with my briefcase. After she confirmed 
my identification, she gave it to me. I was the happiest 
man on earth." 

Jeffrey Gilbert (North Section) was the conductor on 
an Englewood-Howard train that Donald Kess was riding 
northbound on his way home to Evanston. "I was im- 
pressed by the conductor. He called every stop clearly, 
gave information on connecting trains and buses (by 
name and number), had a clear, pleasant voice, and 
knew how to speak into a microphone — not too loudly 
and not too softly. In over 40 years of riding Chicago 
rapid transit, I have never seen a more pleasant and 
knowledgeable conductor. Congratulations to him and to 
the CTA." 



Earl Burress (69th Street 
garage) impressed Rita 
Bollinger, of Stewart 
Avenue, with his courtesy 
as operator of a No. 75 
74th/75th bus. "I have 
never failed to see him 
without a smile or a plea- 
sant word expressed to 
everyone. He is very 
courteous and respectful, 
and remains in control at 
all times. Some 
passengers can make even 
the mildest-mannered peo- 
ple angry, but this driver 
always expresses sym- 
pathy with a pleasant 
word. He does not argue or 
become belligerent, yet he 
gets his point across and 
does his job. He calls out 
each stop, and on 
numerous occasions he 
has taken time to wait for 
those trying to catch his bus. 

Wayne Wardlow (Kedzie garage) was appreciated by 
Juanita Miller, of South Laflin Street, who was a rider on 
his No. 16 Lake bus. "I had a court date and was not 
familiar with the CTA system . When I got off the Ashland 
bus at Lake Street, I was tired, hot and sweaty, and still 
not sure of how to get to traffic court. I asked the (Lake 
Street) driver for directions, and he was so courteous, in- 
formative and helpful, I almost couldn't believe it. I ex- 
pected something else because I was asking too many 
questions, but he took his time and answered every one 
with a smile. He also gave me a CTA map and showed 
me where to go to get back home." 

Joseph Solan Jr. (Forest Glen garage) was thanked by 
Cliff Worth, of Wilmette, for helping his daughter recover 
a purse she left late one night on a No. 92 Foster bus 
driven by Falamarz Malekfar, who turned it in. "After 
transferring to the Howard 'L' she realized her loss, left 
the train, and called us. My wife picked her up and they 
both drove to the Jefferson Park terminal. A grand driver 
named Joe called the garage and even led them there by 
having them follow his bus. The purse was returned to 
my daughter with close to $40 in singles intact. I was 
elated at the 'over and above' service that your fine 
organization provides the citizens of Chicago and sur- 
rounding areas." 

Claude Conwell (69th Street garage) was called "a very 
courteous driver" by Beverly Dyson, of South Winchester 
Avenue, who rode regularly on his No. 48 South Damen 
bus. "He would speak to the passengers in the morning, 
and even say, 'Good night' in the evening. On several oc- 
casions he would get out of his seat to help an elderly per- 
son , or would wait a few seconds for a person running for 
the bus. He is not a pushover, either, because when high 
school students try to smoke, he tells them to put them 
out and to keep the noise down . Even when people try to 
sneak on the bus, he says, 'Make it right,' and they do. I 
believe in giving credit where it's due." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



I 



pA^*, k applauds rail, 
•^ C^ bus honorees 



I 



THANKS for 

a job well done 




"Day in CTA" honorees 
proudly display certilicates 
of special recognition 
presented to them during a 
visit with Operations 
management. The tour 
employees, honored tor 
outstanding service, are 
(from left) Simeon Daigle, 
Jr., instructor, Archer 
garage; Hattie Sandrella, 
motorman, Howard ter- 
minal; Irving Ramey, tower- 
man, O'Hare terminal, and 
Jackie Pritt, supervisor. 
North Rail district. 



. hree rapid transit personnel and a bus instructor were honored with 
"A Day in CTA" for exceptional service. 

Towerman Irving Ramey, assigned to O'Hare terminal, received 
special recognition for his prompt action to prevent extensive damage 
following a derailment, and for minimizing service delays. 

Ramey witnessed the sixth car of an eight-car train on the North- 
South route derail at 61st street last December 5 as one of the brake 
calipers on the car fell off. After observing what happened, Ramey 
signaled the train to stop, thus preventing further damage to the tracks. 

Meanwhile, motorman Hattie Sandrella experienced an unsettling 
event on the same route just three days later when a woman jumped to 
the tracks in front of her train. 

Sandrella applied emergency braking and stopped her train approx- 
imately three to four feet from the woman. The Control Center was 
notified, police were called, and the woman was removed from the 
tracks. 

The incident was particularly significant since only moments before 
the woman jumped to the tracks, motorman Sandrella was having dif- 
ficulties stopping her train. She had already notified her conductor to 
check for a car that may possibly have cut out. 

During another derailment on February 14, rail supervisor Jackie Pritt 
was on duty when a Skokie train left the tracks in the Howard yard and 
blocked northbound Evanston rail service. The incident happened short- 
ly before 7 a.m. 

Assessing the situation, Pritt went to the tower where he could view 
the area surrounding the derailment. From this position, and with the 
cooperation of the towerman, yard foreman, and switchman, Pritt was 
able to have trains moved promptly to provide continued service, and 
to minimize the delay on the Evanston route. 

Bus instructor Simeon Daigle, Jr. of Archer garage was lauded with 
"A Day in CTA" honors for nearly 10 years of sustained superior per- 
formance on his job. Supervisors say Daigle's approach to instruction in- 
cludes the prompt follow-up of accident situations and a search for ways 
to motivate operators. 

He maintains personal contact, conducts frequent rides on target 
lines, and keeps abreast of current operating conditions. Daigle is 
credited with being the "driving force" behind North Avenue and Archer 
winning the Quarterly Safety Award for three quarters in 1976 and 
1984, respectively. 



Shahld Abdullah, "tl 
Rosa Alfaro. Forest Glen 
Katie Avery, North Avenue 

Guldo Barrpra, North Park 
Alvln Bond, North Avenue 
Earl Burress. 69th 

Jean Cage, North Park 
Elolse Carter, 77th Street 
Val Church, Forest Glen 
Gregory Cobbs. Limits 
Dorothy Coleman, Forest Park 
Robert Cossom. North Park 
Armando Cuesta. North Park 

Lawrence Davis, North Park 

Leo Deckelmann Sr., Campaign Area 

Lois Dodds. Archer 

Antanas Drutys. Archer 

Lincoln Eaton . 1 
Darlene Emery, North Si 

George Ferguson. o'»th siri," 
Salvador Flores, North Avenue 
Corrie Fowler, South Rail Dist 

Tommie Garner, North Park 
Jeffrey Gilbert, Howard Kimball 
Wallacene Good, Forest Gten 
Donald Goodar, 77th Street 
Edgar Griffin Jr.. North Avenue 

Judy Hall, Forest Park 
John Harper Jr., Archer 
Rachel Hatch. 77th Street 
Arthur Hawkins Jr., North Avenue 
John Herron, North Avenue 
Rosemary Hosklns. North Park 

Zeke Jagst. North Park 
William James. North Park 
Cedric Johnson, Kedzie 

Martin Kane, Howard/Kimball 
James Kolstad, Beverly 

Paul Lane. Douglas Congress 
LeBlanc LeDree. Limits 
Jesus Llmas, North Park 
Alfonzo Luclous, 69th Street 
Walter Lynch. 69th Street 

William Markowskl. Forest Glen 
Geraldine Mason, Limits 
Ephriam Mauldin, 69th Street 
Flora McClure. 69th Street 
Vernon Mitchell. West Section 
Angel Mojlca. North Park 
Juan Montes. North Park 
Alvin Moore, Special Services 
Ubaldo Munoz. North Park 

Gloria Phillips. 69th Street 
Eugene Price, Kedzie 

Jose Ramos. Archer 
J. D. Rice. 69th Street 
Kenneth Richards. Limits 
Ivan Rodez. North Park 
Robert Rogers, 69th Street 
Toval Ralston, Forest Park 
Keith Rosche, Forest Glen 
James Rubio, Archer 
Rex Runnels. Jefferson Park 

Daniel Sagal. Forest Glen 
Bernabe Serrano, Forest Glen 
Elliott Smith. Limits 
Joseph Solan Jr.. Forest Glen 
Betty Spivey. 69th Street 
Robert Surita. 77th Street 
Thomas Swoope. 77th Street 

Pleas Talley Jr., 69th Street 
Lela Townes, 77th Street 

Paul Vance Jr.. Forest Glen 
Frank Vazquez. Kedzie 

Ben Wallace, Kedzie 
DeLols West. 69th Street 
Willie Whisenton. Limits 
Laurence Whitney. Limits 
lona Williams. North Park 
Claude Woods. Kedzie 

Charles Young. Jefferson Park 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



ublic Safety nwards 



Beverly, 
O'Hare take 
Public Safety 
awards 



Principal Public Safety Analyst 
Michael McCarthy (left) 
presents the Interstation Safe- 
ty plaque to O'Hare terminal. 
Accepting is Assistant Super- 
intendent Andrew Bishop. 





The Interstation Safety plaque for first quarter of 1985 was presented to Beverly garage 
by CTA Safety Manager Tom Boyle (third from left). Accepting are (from left) Assistant 
Superintendent Robert Newman, and Station Superintendent Robert Julun. Area 
Superintendent Tom Riley was also on hand for the presentation. 

The first quarter Public Safety Awards for 1985 were presented to Beverly 
garage, May 2, and O'Hare terminal, May 8, by representatives of the CTA 
Safety Department. Since Public Safety Awards were initiated in 1961, Beverly 
has won the coveted Interstation Safety plaque 21 times, and O'Hare terminal 
17 times. 

For the first quarter of 1 985 Beverly had the third lowest traffic rate in the bus 
system. Its traffic rate of 4.53 accidents for every 100,000 miles was 18 percent 
better than the system rate of 5.54. 

The south side garage, which experienced 46 accident-free days in the first 
quarter, had a passenger rate of 0.77 accidents per 100,000 miles, the best in the 
system, and 30 per cent better than the system rate of 1.10. 

Meanwhile, it was the second consecutive Public Safety Award for O'Hare. 
The terminal's personnel experienced no passenger accidents during the quarter, 
and only two traffic accidents. The first quarter at O'Hare ended with 88 
accident-free days and a traffic rate of 0.079, 51 per cent better than the system 
rate of 0.162. 



Purchasing council 
honors CTA buyer 




10 



Ms. Carolyn Hardy displays the "Buyer of 
the Year" trophy for 1984 awarded to her 
during the 7th Annual Chicago Business 
Opportunity Fair awards dinner May 7. 
Sharing the limelight is CTA Director of 
Procurement Al Martin. 

Buyer Carolyn Hardy of the 
Materials Management department 
has been honored as "Buyer of the 
Year" for 1984 by the Chicago 
Regional Purchasing Council. 

Ms. Hardy who joined CTA May 
21, 1984, began her purchasing ap- 
prenticeship at Johnson Products 
Company in 1970. Prior to her CTA 
association she was Midwest regional 
purchasing manager for the Trade 
Sales Plant and Chemical Coatings 
Plant, Glidden Coatings and Resins 
Division of SMC Corporation. 

A handsome trophy, in recognition 
of the prestigious honor, was 
presented Ms. Hardy on May 7 during 
the seventh annual Chicago Business 
Opportunity Fair which convened at 
the Hyatt Regency. 

The Chicago Business Opportunity 
Fair helps to further the year-around 
efforts of the Chicago Regional Pur- 
chasing Council, Inc., which is 
devoted to stimulating minority pur- 
chasing in Chicago. 

Noting that it is vital that minorities 
be brought into the business 
mainstream, Ms. Hardy said, "I'm 
happy to be playing a role at CTA in 
making this a reality. 

"I am delighted to see minorities 
make progress and I am glad to be 
playing some part in contributing to 
that progress." 

Ms. Hardy is the mother of a son 
and a daughter. 

CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



t 



West Shops worker is 
Croatian history buff 



t 



Retirees 
plans picnic 



"William Vrtlar's travels, 
have also piqued his in- 
terest in the history of 
the "Lost Colony," a 
name given to early 
English settlers on 
Roanoke Island off the 
shore of what is now 
the state of North 
Carolina." 



...--Mi 




ywni 



Irlove over Alex Haley and make room for William Vrtlar who also en- 
joys tracing his ancestral roots. Vrtlar's favorite pastime has taken him as 
far away as his native Yugoslavia, and to Roanoke Island in North 
Carolina. 

A rail laborer at West Shops, Vrtlar is considered a bit of an authority on 
Croatian history. Since immigrating to the United States in 1966, he has 
spent much of his leisure researching the history of a little-known tribe of 
American-Canadian Indians of Croatian descent. 

Historical data suggests that the first Croatians touched American soil 
long before the English. In 1541, a ship from Dubrovnik was wrecked near 
Cape Hatteras, and survivors of this shipwreck intermarried with friendly 
natives. 

Children from these marriages as well as their descendants were called 
"Croatan Indians." Geographers and explorers believed then that India 
was located on the west coast of the Atlantic Ocean, thus they labeled the 
natives "Indians." 

Vrtlar's travels between Yugoslavia and North Carolina have also piqued 
his interest in the history of the "Lost Colony," a name given to early 
English settlers on Roanoke Island off the shore of what is now the state of 
North Carolina. 

History's account of this group is that the small band of Englishmen, 
sent by Sir Walter Raleigh, and led by Governor John White, landed at 
Roanoke on July 22, 1587, but a month later. White was forced to return 
to England for supplies. 

England's war with Spain prevented White's return to Roanoke until 
1590. When he and his party landed at Roanoke, they found the colonists 
were gone. The only traces of them to be found were the letters CRO 
carved on one tree and the word CROATAN carved on another. 

It is believed the colonists were either carried off by passing Spaniards, 
were captured by hostile Indians, or intermarried with friendly Indians or 
other natives of the island. The most persuasive theory, however, is that 
the settlers undertook to sail to England and were lost at sea. Vrtlar con- 
tinues to research the mystery, and has formed an organization in which 
others interested in pursuing their Croatian heritage or locating friends, 
may participate. 



The CTA Senior Citizen Retire- 
ment organization will hold its an- 
nual picnic Saturday, August 31 
at National Grove -3, North River- 
side, located two blocks west of 
Desplaines avenue at 26th street. 

Secretary Jack Kalke said all 
CTA employees are cordially in- 
vited to participate in the day of 
fun where prizes will be available 
for all. 

Kalke also said that hot dogs 
and liquid refreshments will be 
available for everyone, but sug- 
gested that picnic goers may 
wish to bring a lunch basket. 



High Coffee Consumption = 
High Cholestorol 

Men who drink more than three cups 
of coffee a day may be increasing their 
cholesterol levels and. thereby, their 
risk for cardiovascular disease. The 
finding comes from a study reported in 
the Journal of the American Medical 
Association. 

Paul T. Williams. MS. of Stanford 
University School of Medicine, and 
colleagues studied coffee intake and 
plasma lipoprotein levels in 77 middle- 
aged men. They found a positive cor- 
relation between the amount of coffee 
consumed and the levels of 
apolipoprotein B in men who drank 
more than two to three cups per day. 
This correlation was stronger after ad- 
justing for age, cigarette use, body fat. 
aerobic capacity, nutrient intake and 
stress. Coffee intake was similarly 
related to total cholesterol and low- 
density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. 
The causes of these relationships are 
not known. 

"Our analyses suggest that coffee in- 
take exceeding 2-1/2 to 3 cups per 
day is associated with elevated plasma 
concentrations of three well estab- 
lished cardiovascular risk factors: total 
cholesterol. LDL-cholesterol. and 
apolipoprotein B concentrations in a 
sample of sedentary, middle-aged 
men." the researchers say. They add 
that more studies of the relationships 
and the causality are needed. 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



11 



o 



LDER'L' 



cars rehabbed 
from roof to wheels 



BEFORE 



AFTER 




The Chicago Transit Authority 
is rehabilitating 45 of its older 
'L' cars from wheels to roofs 
to give them at least 10 more 
years of service and to provide more 
comfortable riding. 

"The average cost of rebuilding 
each car is $188,000," said CTA 
Chairman Michael A. Cardilli. "We 
expect to add at least 10 years of 
dependable service to these cars which 
are now 25 years old. This is a tremen- 
dous saving for us since the replace- 
ment cost would probably average at 
least $600,00 for each car." 

The 45 cars are used primarily on 
the Skokie Swift and Evanston rapid 
transit routes serving those suburbs on 
Chicago's Far North Side, plus the 
village of Wilmette. 

Each car is getting complete exterior 
body repair and is being repainted in 
the CTA's standard color scheme of 
silver and charcoal gray with horizon- 
tal red, white, and blue striping at the 
window ledge. The power systems, 
heating and ventilating systems, and 
trucks are being overhauled. New 
shock absorbers and springs are being 
installed. Worn parts of doors, win- 
dows, and destination signs are being 
replaced. 

Cars in service on 
the Skokie Swift route 
will get new panto- 
graphs used for the 
overhead power supply. 

The interior of 
the cars will be 
decorated with painted 
cream ceilings and upper 
walls and with walnut 
wood-grained melamine panels from 
the window base to the floor. All seats 
are being reupholstered. 

This $8.5 million contract was 
awarded to the Morrison-Knudsen 
Company of Hornell, N.Y., the lowest 
of four qualified bidders. 

All of the rehabilitated cars are ex- 
pected to be in service by December 1 
of this year. The four, 38-year-old 
three-section articulated cars now 
operating on the Skokie Swift route 
will be retired later this year when all 
45 cars have had the work completed. 





12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



BEFORE 




1985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



13 



Graduates in CTA Families \\XxS 




PAULETTE 
ALEXANDER 

Calumet H.S. 
Betty Alexander 

69th Street 



USA ANN ALLMAN 

George Rogers Clark 

H.S. 

Patricia Glines 

Datacenter 



RAMONA 
ALMODOVAR 

Antioch Upper 
Genuel Almodovar 

North Park 



CARMEN ARNOLD 

Loop College 
Betty McMath 

Kedzie 



MARVA D. BARRY 

St. Joseph's Hospital 

of Joliet School of 

Nursing 

Edward Willis 

69th Street 



THERESA MARY 
BAXA 

Immaculate Heart of 

Mary H.S. 

Bill Baxa 

Public Affairs 



I 




GREGORY 
BELINKOV 

Illinois Institute 
of Technology 
Lev Belinkov 

Skokie Shop 



ANDREA M. BELL 

Proviso East H.S. 
Morris Jones, Sr. 

North Avenue 



KEN BENSHISH 

Driscoll Catholic H.S. 
Ron Benshish 

Maintenance, Safety 



EVELYN BORRERO 

Benito Juarez H.S. 
Pedro Borrero 

Law 



KEVIN E. BOYD 

Morgan Park H.S. 
Earl V. Boyd 

Treasury 
Shirley Boyd 

Oper. Adm. Servs. 



MARY PAT BOYLE 

Marillac H.S. 

Tom Boyle 

Safety 




* 




ANGELA CATRINA 
BRENT 

Academy of Our Lady 
Robert L. Brent 

Skokie Shop 



ROBERT D. 
BROWN 

Percy L. Julian H.S. 
Julio D. Ruiz 

Howard Shop 
Retiree 



DAPHNE M. 
BRUCE 

Waynesboro Central 

H.S. 

Richard Bruce 

North Auenue 



DENISE L. BRUCE 

Waynesboro Central 

H.S. 

Richard Bruce 

North Auenue 



JESSE E. BURNS, 
JR. 

Whitney Young H.S. 
Jesse E. Bums, Sr. 

Limits 



JOSEPH EUGENE 
CAPPELLETTI, JR. 

Loyola University 

Joseph Cappelletti, 

Sr. 

Accounts Payable 




KATHY 
CARBONELLI 

Notre Dame H.S. 
Sal Carbonelli 

Forest Glen 



MARKETA CARTER 

Calumet H.S. 

Charles Carter 

Ethel Carter 

77th Street 



LAVELLE CEPHAS 

Leo H.S. 
James Cephas 

77th Street 



ANGELA CHITTO 

Von Steuben H.S. 
Maggie Chitto 

North Park 



CYNTHIA R. 
CLARK 

Corliss H S 
Thurman G. Collier 

South Shops 



KEVIN EDWARD 
COLDING 

Bowen H.S. 
Edward L. Colding 

North Rail District 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



CARMEN B. 
COLLINS 

Chicago State Univ. 
James A. Collins 

77th Street 



SANDRA H. 
CONNORS 

Clark College 
Joseph L. Connors 

Limits Garage 
Retiree 



MICHAEL K. 
COULTER 

Quigley Seminary 

South 
Samuel Coulter 

77th Street 



TRINA M. CROSS 

Julian H.S 
James L. Cross 

77th Street 



SHARON C. 
CURRIN 

Thornton 
David Currln 

South Rail District 



DEBORAH DAIGLE 

Morton II S 

Simeon Dalgle 

Archer 




ALBERT FRANK 
DAVIS 

Kenwood Academy 

H.S. 

Jessie F. Davis 

Forest Glen 



CHARLES E. 
DAVIS, JR. 

Lindbloom Tech H.S. 

Charles E. Davis, 

Sr. 



Wilson Shop 



DEBORAH DEC 

Lourdes High School 
Raymond Dec 

Skokie Shop 



JEROME N. 
DEXTER, JR. 

Gordon Tech H S. 

Jerome N. Dexter, 

Sr. 

, South Shops 



IVAN TRAVE2 
DROIRA 

Joliet Catholic H.S. 
Marcelo Droira 

Forest Glen 



KENNETH ROMEL 
ELAM 

Hillcrest H S 
Ellie M. Head 

69th Street 




TRACY L. FLORES 

Jesus Our Brother 
Michael M. Flores 

North Park 



ALBERT T. GALUS 

Maine South H.S. 
Ted J. Galus 

Forest Glen 



VERONICA ANNA 
GODFREY 

Immaculate 

Conception H.S 

Thomas J. Godfrey 

West Shop 



CRAIG ALAN 
GONDER 

Crystal Lake 

Central H.S. 

Emmet Ronald 

Gonder, Budget 



ERNESTO J. 
GONZALES. JR. 

Hanson Park H S 
Maria L. Gonzales 

Public Affairs 



MELANA CARRIE 
GONZALES 

Lourdes H.S 
Jesse Gonzales 

Archer 




LANDICHY L. 
GONZALES 

Von Steuben H.S. 

Enrique (Henry) 

Gonzales 

North Park Garage 



DAVID D. 
GREGORY 

Gage Park H.S. 

Jacqueline G. 

Cousin 

Kedzie 



JACKI GRZELAK 

Taft Jr. H.S. 
John J. Grzelak 

North Avenue 



PATRICK KEVIN 
GUINEE 

Marist H.S. 
John Gulnee 

Beverly 



H. J. HACKETT 

Southern Illinois Univ 
Vlrdell Hackett 

North Avenue 



KIM A. HACKETT 

Univ of Illinois 

Virdell Hackett 

North Avenue 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



15 



ROBERT J. 
HASEMANN, JR. 

Elmwood Park H.S. 

Robert J. Haseman, 

Sr. 

Equip. Engr/Maint. 



JAMES M. 
JAKSCHT 

Gordon Tech H.S. 
Eunice M. Jakscht 

Chairman s Office 



ERIC D. 
JEFFERSON 

Olive-Harvey College 
Ollie Jefferson 

77th Street 



CILICIA ANN 
JOHNSON 

Queen of Peace H.S. 
Ernest L. Johnson 

South Shops 



LUCTRICIA M. 
JOHNSON 

Saint Sabina H.S. 
Ernest L. Johnson 

South Shop 



RODNEY JONES 

St. Mary of the Lake 
Donald Anderson 

North Section 




DAVE KELLER 

Winnoa State 
Neville Keller 

Forest Glen 



REBECCA LAST 

East Lydon H.S. 

Clifford A. Last 

Forest Glen 

Patricia Last 

Pensions 



SHERYL JEAN 
LINDEMULDER 

Maria H.S. 

Ben G. 

Lindemulder 

South Shops 



SANDRA MAYLEN 
McCREE 

Southern Illinois Univ. 
Bobby McCree 

Madison /Wabash 



JANISE 
MARSHALL 

Proviso West H.S. 
James E. Marshall 

Labor Relations 



STEVEN 
MIRETZKY 

Yeshiva Univ. 
Marvin Miretzky 

Internal Audit 




DARLETTA 
MOORE 

Lane Tech H.S. 
H. Moore 

Distrct "D" 



CAROLYN ANN 
MUNYER 

Robert Morris College 
George Munyer 

Bus Relief - North 



KELLEY M. 
MURPHY 

Bogan H.S. 
Larry Murphy 

Affirmative Action 



SHAWN MURPHY 

Rich Township H.S 

East 

Patrick Murphy 

Fac. Engr/Maint 



MICHELE RENEE 
NEEKA 

Romeoville H.S. 
Stanley J. Neeka 

Fac. Engr/Maint. 



DEBBI NELSON 

Conant H.S. 
Ron Nelson 

West Shops 




JAMES OCHOA 

Gordon Tech HS 
Mario Ochoa 

Affirmative Action 



MARK OCHOA 

DePaul Univ. 
Mario Ochoa 

Affirmative Action 



SERGIO OCHOA 

Univ. of Illinois 
Mario Ochoa 

Affirmative Action 



TONY R. PANOZZO 

Bloom Trail H.S. 
Ennio Panozzo 

Skokie Shop 



GEORGE J. 
PAYTON, JR. 

Thornridge H.S. 

George J. Pay ton, 

Sr. 

Beverly 



JAMES PERK 

Brother Rice H S 
Daniel R. Perk 

Finance 



16 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



KATHY PERKINS 

Taft H.S. 
John Perkins 

Opers. Training 



DERRICK L. 
PITTMAN 

Willibrod 

Catholic H.S. 

Leodis Pittman 

77th Street 



MORGAN L. 
REEVES 

Corliss H.S. 
Barbara Reeves 

Training Center 



CURTIS PHILLIPS, 
JR. 

Simeon H.S. 
Curtis Phillips, Sr. 

Beverly 



DIANE DILLON 
PHILLIPS 

National College 

of Education 
Rudolph Dillon 

Rail ■ North 



MICHAEL R. 
PIENTO 

Maine East H.S 
Joseph W. Plento 

Control Center 



LAURA PINCHOT 

Prospect H.S 
Wesley Pinchot 

Fac. Eng 



WILLIAM 
PINCHOT 

Prospti I H.S 
Wesley Pinchot 

Fac Eng 




VERONICA 
PORTER 

Corliss H.S. 
John Porter 

Beverly 



LILLIAN QUILES 

Kelvyn Park H.S. 
Cruz Quiles 

North Avenue 



DOMINIQUE M. 
RANDALL 

Morgan Park H S 
Leslie Randall 

North Park 



KAROL D. REED 

Madonna H.S. 
E. Hall-Wofford 
W. C. Wofford 

Harlem /Lake 



ROBERT T. REED 

St Helena 
Robert Reed 

Washington Garage 




LYNN ROCKWELL 

Taft H.S. 

Bob Rockwell 

Mgmt. Info. Systems 



SCOTT 
ROCKWELL 

Univ. of Illinois 
Bob Rockwell 

Mgmt. Info Systems 



DAVID ROMANS 

Whitney Young H.S 
H. Moore 
District "D" 



MICHAEL JAMES 
ROMBOUT 

Gordon Tech H S 
Joseph Rombout 

Rosemont 



LAURA L. 
SANDOVAL 

Madonna H S 
Ivadel J. Sandoval 

North Park 




MICHAEL SAWYER 

St. Ignatius Col. Prep 

Ernest Sawyer 

Planning & Devel. 

Theresa Sawyer 

Claims 



LINCOLN W. 
SEABROOKS 

DeVry Inst, of Tech. 

Frank W. 

Seabrooks, Jr. 

West Shops 



MICHAEL EDWARD 
SCHNITZIUS 

Holy Cross H S 
Edward J. Schnitzius 

North Park 



HUGH D. SHORT. 
JR. 

Kenwood Academy 

H.S. 
Hugh D. Short. Sr. 

District "A" 



DAVID J. STEPHEN 

Chicago Vocational 

H.S. 

James D. Stephen 

Control Center 



KIMBERLY Y. 
STEVENS 

Jones Metropolitan 

H.S 

Gideon Stevens. Jr. 

63rd Ashland Term 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



17 




ROSALYN 
TANKSLEY 

Academy of Our Lady 
Joe Tanksley 

North Section 



MARY ANN TAYLOR 

Lindbloom H.S. 
Earl J. Burress 

69th Street 



GERALD 
THOMPSON 

Kenwood Academy 
Olivia Thompson 

Administrative Services 



DANA LOVE WHITE 

Lindbloom H.S. 
Harvey L. White 

69th Street 




BYRON G. WILLIS 

Leo H.S. 
Edward Willis 

69th Street 



MYRON L. WILLIS 

Leo H.S. 
Edward Willis 

69th Street 



VERANDA WILLIS 

Michael Reese Hosp. 

School of 

Cytotechnology 

Edward Willis 

69th Street 



BRUCE J. 
WILLIAMS 

Brother Rice H.S. 
lller J. Williams 

District "A" 




DOREEN WILSON 

Bloom H.S. 
Dorothy Wilson 

North Section /Kimball 



VERONIEA K. 
WILSON 

Lane H.S. 
James M. Wilson 

Beverly 



STEVE WOOL 

Evanston Township 

H.S. 

Leon Wool 

Claims 



TRILBE WYNNE 

Kenwood Academy 
Robert Wynne 

95th Terminal 




CAROL YOUNG 

Foreman H.S. 
Alphonso Young 

Forest Glen 



STEVEN ZANIN 

Glenbard East H.S. 
Chuck Zanin 

Administrative Servs 



Jedynak celebrates 
retirement and 
good fortune 




Ed Jedynak prepares to enjoy the first 
piece of his retirement cake served by Vito 
Skorupski, carpenter and union steward. 

"I come from a long line of cabinet 
makers, going all the way back to 
Prague, Czechoslovakia," explains 
Edward Jedynak, a carpenter as- 
signed to Wilson Shop. He and his 
three brothers (including Mitchell, who 
also works for CTA and will retire next 
year) are carpenters, as were their 
father, grandfather, and great- 
grandfather. Their family tradition of 
fine craftsmanship has earned the 
respect of co-workers. 

"Ed Jedynak and 1 worked as part- 
ners when he first joined CTA in 
1969. I didn't have to teach him a 
thing," said unit supervisor Joseph 
Fucarino. "He knows more about 
carpentry, woodworking, and cabinet 
making than anyone I know or ever 
heard about. Ed is an artist with 
wood." 

Jedynak loved his work, and he and 
his wife, Josepha, raised two 
daughters in their home in the Jeffer- 
son Park community. But they also 
faced the prospect of receiving less 
than full retirement benefits when he 
would retire in 1988 at age 65, with 
less than the required 20 years of ser- 
vice. 

But Jedynak's fortune took a turn 
for the better last year. So, on May 30, 
Wilson Shop workers gathered at a 
party organized by Vito Skorupski, 
shop steward and recording secretary 
of Carpenter's Union Local 1027, and 
carpenter Leonard Nelson, to 
celebrate Jedynak's early retirement. 

On December 29, 1984, Jedynak 
won $2,999,660 in the Illinois State 
Lottery. His lottery "pension" is more 
than $12,000 per month (before 
taxes), and his CTA pension will be 
nice spending money while he and his 
wife are touring the world. 



18 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 





mm 




AS REPORTED BY EMPLOYEES OF THE CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 




ft MEET YOUR REPORTER ft 

Greetings. I'm your Inside 
News Reporter for Transit 
News. If you wish to share 
any interesting bits of news 
or know someone you 
would like to commend, 
contact me on extension 
4861 in the Mart. Only with 
your help can we make In- 
side News a success and 
make the magazine more in- 
teresting and exciting to 

read e i 

Sincerely. 

Arlene Zittman 

Materials Management 

Barbara Schmitz, executive secretary, Operations (on 
leave of absence), visited Auntie Carol Griseto, executive 
secretary, Materials Management, with nine-month-old 
Ericka. Baby Ericka's daddy, Bruce, works in 
Maintenance. You can see that it's a family affair. Bruce, 
Barbara, and the baby will vacation in Florida and after- 
wards Barbara will return to work Ruthanne Miles, unit 
supervisor, Records Center, fell and broke her wrist. She 
thanks everyone for remembering her during this recent ac- 
cident. Hope to see you back soon. . Ella Otis, procedures 
analyst, and Willie Otis, instructor. North Park, are very 
proud of their one and only child. Marcus, who graduated 
from the University of Chicago Laboratory Middle School in 
June. Because of his scholastic aptitude. Marc was selected 
to participate in the Bright and Talented Program held at the 
North Shore Day Country School in Winnetka on Satur- 
days. Marc will attend Brother Rice high school in the fall, 
and his goal in life is to be a doctor. Good luck in your 
endeavors. Marc . . . All of us extend our deepest sympathy to 
Rita Krueger, who lost her brother suddenly, and to 
retired Stores employee Nick LaCorcia, whose wife 
passed away... Buyer of the Year Award went to our own 
Carolyn S. Hardy. Minority vendors in the Chicago area 
voted her this award. It was sponsored by the Minority 
Business Subcouncil of the Chicago Regional Purchasing 
Council, Inc. Awards were presented at the 7th Annual 
Buyer Awards Dinner May 7. which was held at the Hyatt 
Regency Chicago Hotel. Congratulations, Carolyn. 

Treasury 

David Munyer Jr., cashier, retired June 1 with 33 years 
of service. His many friends and co-workers celebrated this 
happy occasion at a dinner held in his honor at the Holiday 
Inn Mart Plaza. Buttons restaurant. David, his wife Karen, a 
former Claim Department employee, and their daughter. 
Christa, are retiring to San Diego, California. We'll miss 
you, Dave... Linda Martinez, Sales Section, recently 
resigned to become a full-time mother. She plans to spend 



some time in Mexico this summer Many of her friends 
wished her well at a luncheon and dinner. Good luck. 
Linda... Congratulations to newlywed Alan Sabol, bank 
ledger bookkeeper. 

Operations 

Pat Dunek, executive secretary. Administrative Ser- 
vices, spent two weeks in Madeira Beach, Florida, sharing a 
condo with her brother Jim and his wife. Linda. I'.ii re 
turned to work sporting a nice suntan. Pat also wants us to 
know that she is proud of her twin nephews. John and 
Paul, who graduated from grade school Congratulations, 
boys. By the way, the twins think Pat is a super-auntie. 

Management Services 

John Schwartz, special projects coordinator, retired Ju- 
ly 1 with 42 years of service. A retirement luncheon was 
held at the M&M Club John won't have much time to miss 
us because soon after his retirement, he'll be off for a well- 
deserved vacation. When he returns he plans to join other 
retirees Dagmar McNamara (Materials Management) and 
Bill Ashley (Insurance & Pensions), to mention a couple, 
who volunteer at the Art Institute. John also wants to catch 
up on things that we all somehow put off while we are work- 
ing. Good luck, John. I'm sure we'll still see John around 
the 7th floor of the Mart, because he will remain the Presi- 
dent of the CTA General Office Federal Credit Union . Our 
librarian. Lill Culbertson, wishes to thank her CTA friends 
for all their prayers and cards that she received during her 
illness. Hope to see her back at the catalog file 
soon. LaVerne Schultz, supervisor. Office Services, and 
her husband, Ed, are proud grandparents for the first time. 
Their daughter. Karen, who worked here summers while 
going to college, and her husband. Craig, welcomed their 
new son. Ross Steven, on April 10 Ross weighed in at 7 
pounds, IOV2 ounces, and was 19 inches long. 

Retirees 

Marge Dorgan, retired key punch operator, visited her 
friends at the Mart. Would you believe Marge has been 
retired for five years? Time does fly by quickly, especially 
when you're having fun. Mable Potthast, Accounting, 
wants to be remembered to all her friends at the Mart . Mable 
keeps busy traveling and taking care of her family, especially 

her lit,le d °9 Arlene Zittman 

North Park 

Wondering where to go on vacation? Well, check with in- 
structor W. J. Prunell, who recently spent two weeks in 
Frankfort. Germany, with the Army Reserve, coordinating 
logistics and studying the German public transportation 
sytem. While there, he also had an opportunity to visit the 
Wall separating East and West Germany... Supervisor Les 
Isaacson will be one of those proud parents watching when 
his daughter. Lena, graduates from grammar school tins 
June. Hang your heads in shame, gentlemen! Operator 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



19 




ran wm^ mw 




Bryan Charles Unrein 



Vicki Nesbit just picked up another trophy along with a 
$50 cash prize, which she won in a recent competition with 
30 other contestants in a billiards tournament. This trophy 
joins another on her mantle, which attests to her cue stick 
skill... Yes, those bulletin boards in our training room which 
suddenly have so much interesting information that most of 
us can't help smiling when first seeing it, are due to Team 
Leader #5, Rosemary 
Hoskins Walker, who also 
asks that anyone with artistic 
drawing skills please contact 
her... Operator Ed Unrein's 
son, Edward, and daughter- 
in-law, Cheryl, recently 
presented him with his first 
grandson, Bryan, who 
weighed in at 8 and one-half 
pounds. Mom, Dad, and 
Bryan live in Orlando, Florida. 
Mike Flores 

Skokie Shop 

A popular employee in 
area 428 is retiring the first 
of July. He will be missed 
very much by his co- 
workers. His cheerful smile 
and his stellar personality is 
like a ray of sunshine on a 
cloudy day. We, his co- 
workers, hope that his 
desire to take Delia on 
that trip around the world 
will be fulfilled. Lot's of 
luck, Stan BarnasLOn 
August 17, Skokie Shop 
Stan Barnas will hold it 10th Annual 

Golf Outing at Villa Olivia. Shoot for the birdie, guys. ..On 
May 9, Ann Porcaro, the wife of Jerry Porcaro, Skokie 
electrician, gave birth to a baby boy, Luke. 
Congratulations!.. This past April 12, Dale Jones, 
machinist, became engaged to Shelagh Dawe, an ex- 
ecutive secretary for Associates Commercial Corporation. 
The wedding is scheduled for May 4, 1986. Welcome to the 
club, buddy. Greg Winski 

Internal Audit 

Who was handing out 
pink-foil-wrapped 
chocolate cigars in April? 
Mike Hoffert of 
Photographic, to celebrate 
the birth on April 15 of little 
Laura Renee. Laura 
weighed in at 6 pounds, 12 
ounces at Humana 
Hospital in Hoffman 
Estates. Mom Linda is do- 
ing fine, and sisters Kathy 
and Beth will show Laura Laura Renee Hot,ert 

the ropes. Congratulations!. And bouncing Aries No. 2, 
Jonathan Rowan Walton, came into this world on April 
17, making Helene (Bunny) Greiman, Promotional Ser- 





vices, a proud auntie. Jonathan weighed in at 7 pounds, 14 
ounces. Congratulations to Mom Laurie and Dad Peter 
Walton... Tamara Rodgers, the daughter of Thelma 

Rodgers, Administrative 
Services, Duplicating Sec- 
tion, received the Juris 
Doctorate degree from 
Loyola University School 
of Law on June 16. Cur- 
rently a law clerk with 
James D. Montgomery 
and Associates, Ms. 
Rodgers will practice law in 
the Chicago area after she 
is admitted to the bar and 
licensed .. .Gerald L. 




Tamara Rodgers 




Thompson, the 18-year- 
old Kenwood Academy 
track-star son of dup- 
licating finishing clerk 
Olivia P. Thompson, ad- 
ded more victories to his 
string of accomplishments 
recently in the 3.200- 
meter run, and the 
3,200-meter relay during 
the City Championship 
Gerald L Thompson meet of the Public League 

Boys' Track and Field title 

at Robeson High School. 

Thompson was featured 

on the back page of the 

April Transit News... 

Robin Hasemann, a 

sophomore at Luther 

North High School, has 

been unanimously voted to 

the PSL All-Conference 

Team of the United States. 

Robin, the daughter of 

Robert Hasemann St., 

unit supervisor. Equipment 

Engineering and Maintenance, was the only person selected 

in Illinois. As a sophomore, she was elected co-captain of 

the Varsity Squad this season, and broke two school 

records. Her season total was 539 points, with 298 re- 
bounds, and 69 per cent at the free-throw line. 

Joyce Petrich 

69th Street 

Welcome back to operator Zola Harrington (4837) after 
a nine-week sick leave for wrist surgery... Heart-felt sorrow 
for operator Wilbur Milner (2700) who recently returned 
from Richmond, Virginia, where his sister's family was in- 
volved in a tragic fire, which ended in the loss of their home. 
The family was hospitalized for smoke inhalation... Con- 
dolences go out to operator Ruthie Ferguson (3285) in 
the loss of her mother on March 18... Operator Gus Jones 
(5152), off since January 1 when first injured on duty, suf- 
fered a stroke. He is still off sick and missed very 
much... Operator Robert Crockett (2807), off sick since 
January 10, is very ill, and would like to hear from his 
friends... Good to see operator Beverly Dortch (12722) 




Robin Hasemann 



20 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



VAi \m\DZ fl£WS 



back. Her friendly smile was missed... A very special 
welcome back to our chief clerk, Tom Randall, who 
returned to work April 28 after more than a two-week leave 
due to illness. When asked how he felt, Tom said, "A little 
weak, but nothing that a little TLC wouldn't take care of." 
We're glad you're back, Chief... Operator Frank Jones 
(5843) suffered a heart attack on April 27, and was taken to 
Holy Cross Hospital. Frank had to undergo surgery, and is 
now recovering. Our prayers are with you, Frank. ..VACA- 
TION TIME: Visiting relatives in Evergreen and Houma, 
Louisiana, for 10 days was 
operator Frank Goudeau 
(4902). Frank says he gained 
a few pounds. Even though 
it rained every day he ma- 
naged to get around to see 
a lot of nice places. Frank 
thinks he might consider 
retiring there. .. 
Operator Isaac Taylor 
(3445) is a very proud un- 
cle. His niece, Wanda Wanda Bell 




Bell, graduated from Evansville University. Con- 
gratulations, Wanda ... Operator Keith Griffith 
(12053) was seen sneaking off to Friendship and 
Adams, Wisconsin, for a one-week stay with a close 
friend. Secret rendezvous, Keith?.. Operator Rosetta 
Jones (7080) enjoyed a two-week vacation, just relaxing at 
home. It's good just to get a break away from work, she 
says. I know the feeling well... Operator Mary Ann Scott 
(13355) and her son, Michael, are off to Noxubeeda 
County, a suburb of McComb, Mississippi, to visit her 
grandparents and also to visit her mother's grave site. Fresh 
air and peace is what Mary Ann says she seeks. Any pro 
spects of seeking a new spouse?.. Just having fun in the sun 
is operator Donna Black (13105), vacationing in Los 
Angeles, California, for two weeks... The First Church of 
Deliverance held a birthday celebration at the M&M Club in 
the Merchandise Mart for their pastor, Rev. Eugene Gray. 
At their special request, operator LaVerne Williams 
(4593) drove the charter because this is her church. What a 
way to go, La Verne... Operator Janie Boyd (4363) knows 
how to enjoy her birthday, which was on May 19. She left 
on a Fantasy Cruise to Nassau and Miami Beach, Florida. 



SERVICE ANNIVERSARIES 



Pensioners 



February 
35 Years 

James Haynie. South Shops 
Robert Madison, Beverly 
Raymond Rogers, District A 
James Smith, 69th Street 
Thomas Stepp, Claims 

30 Years 

James Bell, Special Services 
William Coyle. Bldg Wiring 
Rodman Dougherty, Proc Engineers 
Frank Halper, Signal. Phone & Radio 
Frank Kostrzewa Jr., Forest Glen 
Dominic Lochlrco, Archer 

25 Years 

Alex Carter Jr.. 77th Street 
James Christman, 77th Street 
Edward Colwell, Rail Service 
David Curry Jr.. Rail Pers -North 
L. Fletcher. District C 
Donald Gilligan. Rail Pers -North 
Robert Johnson, Rail Dist North 
Edward Lawson, 69th Street 
David Martin, Operations Control 
Leonard Nelson, General Maint 
Marshall Price, 77th Street 
Gerald Rosenburg. North Section 
Andrew Shaw Jr.. South Shops 
Harold Smith, 69th Street 
John Stiles, Howard/Kimball 
Harold Thurbush, Rail Service 
Harrell Walker, 77th Street 



May 



35 Years 

Glenn Andersen, Ind Equpt Design 
Lewis Both. North Park 
James Jackson Jr.. Archer 
Willie Kanady. 69th Street 
Joseph LaBellarte, Des Plaines 
Walter Rakauskls. Utility 

30 Years 

Robert Dillar. North Park 
Booker Henry, Special Services 
Joseph Lazzara. Prog. Implmt 



Winmon Lewis Jr., South Shops 
Joe Moore, Track & Roadway 
Thomas Randall. 69th Street 
Ralph Stuart. 77th Street 

25 Years 

Walter Caston, Bus Pers -South 

Samuel Cook, 69th Street 

Carroll Dalton, Esc Mtce 

Richard Dorsch, North Avenue 

Vincent Gasparaltis. Sig . Phone & Radio 

Wilbur Martz, Jefferson Park 

John Perkins. Bus Instruction 

Bill Slankard. Charter/Pass Rev 



June 
40 Years 

Regina Daren, 

Human Resources 



35 Years 

Theodore Love Jr., Archer 
Harry Reddrick Jr., Operations 
Edward White Jr.. District C 

30 Years 

Ovelton Blanchard. District A 
Jlmmie Hill. 69th Street 
Henry Jackson. Special Services 
Michael Keating. Support Serves 
Eugene Reld, General Mtce 
Dler Williams. District A 

25 Years 

Stanley Barnas, South Shops 
Henry Frezell. Kedzie 
Richard Griseto. Subst Mice 
Talmadge Ireland Jr.. Archer 
Adam Knerr, Track & Raodway 
James McMahon, Stores-North 
Salvatore Muscarello. North Park 
Richard Power. Archer 
Hugh Short. Bus Service 
Anthony Velcich. Support Services 



May 




ARNOLD CAMPBELL. Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen. Emp. 1-11-60 
ANTONIO CHAVEZ. Ticket Agent. 

95th Street, Emp 12-3-62 
LAWRENCE COSTLEY. Collector. 

Forest Glen. Emp 12-30-57 
FREDERICK DECHON. 

Bus & Truck Mech.. 

South Shops. Emp. 4-19-47 
JAMES DORSEY. Switchman, 

61st Street. Emp 12-21-57 
NICK FIERAMOSCA. Car Rep A. 

Harlem Shop. Emp 4-2-53 
CHARLIE FLORENCE. Towerman. 

O'Hare Terminal, Emp. 3-1-49 
THOMAS FREEMAN. Instructor, 

O'Hare Terminal, Emp. 12-5-47 
VENET1A HELM. Ticket Agent. 

63rd & Ashland. Emp 3-23-57 
JOHN KURGAN. Upholsterer Frmn . 

South Shops. Emp. 10-18-44 
TIMOTHY CROURKE. 

Claim Representative. 

Law/Claims, Emp 10-22-46 
JOHN ROCHE. Escalator Serviceman. 

West Shops. Emp 8-7-46 
LAWRENCE ROGERS. 

Money Handler I. 

77th Street, Emp 2 14-78 
FRANK TURS1CH. Elec Engr III. 

West Shops, Emp 10-31-77 
WILLIAM WARD. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 6-12-57 
ELOISE WASH. Ticket Agent. 

Kimball, Emp 9-26 64 
EARL WILLIAMS. Bus Operator. 

Beverly. Emp 4-18-55 

Disability Retirements 

FELLIX CULL. Rail Janitor. 

Madison/Wabash. Emp 10-11-65 
STERLING MOUNDAY. Bus Operator. 

77th Street. Emp 7-22-71 
EDWARD RICH. Collector. 

77th Street. Emp 7-28-60 



June 

JOHN BOLAND. Supvr . Prop Mgmt 

& Rptg . Fin Srvcs . Emp 2 25 43 
FRANK CHIAPPETTA. Car Repairer A. 

Harlem Shop. Emp 10-31-51 
GORDON EGGERS. B Electrician. 

West Shops. Emp 1 1 2-67 
MARTIN ENGSTROM. Supt . Fac Tech 

Srvcs , West Shops. Emp 5-5-75 
JOSEPH FLORES. Collector. 

North Avenue. Emp 10-22-64 
MICHAEL GRICKI. Bus Operator. 

Kedzie. Emp 5-2-57 
JOHN JANKUS. Supply Contr Coord . 

South Shops. Emp 11- 13-46 
EDWARD JEDYNAK. Carpenter. 

West Shops. Emp 12 29-69 
DOMICELLA KALWASINSKI. 

Bindery Wrkr . 

South Shops. Emp 1 12-60 
ROBERT KILPATRICK. Rail Janitor. 

Madison. Wabash. Emp 10-3-52 
JOSEPH LECHMAN. Steamfitter. 

West Shops. Emp 1-29-75 
ROBERT LONG. Bus Operator, 

69th Street. Emp 9 19 60 
STANLEY LUPINA. Serv Truck Chauf . 

West Shops, Emp 1 11 51 
WILBUR MARTZ. Conductor. 

O'Hare Terminal. Emp 5-2-60 
DAVID MUNYER. Cashier I, 

Treasury Emp 3-19-52 
CONSTANTINO PAONESSA. Laborer, 

West Shops, Emp 5-26-70 
SILAS SEVERSON. Substation Util Man. 

West Shops. Emp 6-24-54 
MARVIN SIKES. Bus Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp 8-16-62 
BRUNO VANDERVELDE. Bus Operator. 

Beverly. Emp 8-18-60 

Disability Retirements 

HLLY SCOTT. Bus Operator. 
Limits. Emp 3 20-67 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



21 




mw 



on May 17... SPECIAL EVENTS: This reporter has reason 
to be doubly proud of sons Terrence P. Head and Ken- 
neth R. Elam. Terrence has been accepted for a one-year 
scholarship to Weber High School, and an offer to play on 
the basketbll team. Kenneth has been accepted for admis- 
sion in the engineering program at the University of Illinois 
in Urbana with a four-year scholarship. He ranks 25 out of 
315 in the 1985 graduating class at Hillcrest High School, 
Country Club Hills. He is also awaiting appointment of ad- 
mission to the Naval Academy. 

Ellie Head 

North Section 

The birth of a daughter to Jim and Rochelle 

Unnerstall of Bethesda, Md., makes this reporter a proud 
grandmother for the first time. Baby Lara Nicole, born 
April 15, tipped the scales at 8 pounds, 3 ounces. Jim is a 
former North Park bus operator. He is currently finishing 
post-doctorate studies at the National Institute of 
Health in Bethesda 
Rhonda Brent, 19, the 
daughter of North Section 
ticket agent Charlotte F. 
Brent, is an aviation air- 
man apprentice serving 
with the U.S. Navy at 
China Lake, California, 
where she is training as an 
air controller. After 
graduation. Airman Ap- 
prentice Brent expects to Rhonda Brent 
be assigned to duty in the Far East or the European Theater. 
Miss Brent is a 1983 alumnus of Percy L. Julian High 
School, and is a former member of the Antioch Baptist in- 
spirational choir... Agent Supervisor Betty Stephenson 
has bounced back to good health following major surgery. 




Betty looks great, and she has acquired a new hobby of 
landscape gardening. She has been busy turning her 
backyard into a showplace. Some of the materials she is us- 
ing include rocks, urns, and railroad ties. She also utilized 
sedum as a ground cover, providing a soft green 
background for dahlias and gladiolae, which are only a few 
of the many lovely plants she is using. j Q j\ nr j erson 

Police Liaison 

Pensioner Jim La- 

mont (left), retired 
Jan. 8, visited pen- 
sioner Oscer Klose 

and his wife, Lois, 

while in Vero Beach, 

Fla., for the winter. 

Oscer has been retired 

for over 22 years, and 

enjoyed hearing about 

all his CTA friends 
Jim Lamont and Oscer Klose agajn Both Jjm and 

Oscer worked out of South 
Shops... Martin Willis, 16, a 
junior at Bremen High School, 
Midlothian, and the son of 
Transit News Editor Rick and 
Dorothy Willis, was inducted 
into the National Honor Socie- 
ty April 24. Willis' scholastic 
achievement through a dual 
system of special honors 
courses as well as regular cur- 
riculum study, has boosted his 
grade point average to 4.78. A 
minimum 4.4. GPA of a possi- 
ble 5.0 is required for 





Martin Willis 



insr :ive:e:iveo:r.i.a.}ve 



May 



JOSEPH BLAA. 89. Transportation. 

Emp 9-1425. Died 4-20-85 
RUSSEL C BROOKS. 65. North Avenue. 

Emp 6-19 58. Died 3 31-85 
JOHN P BUKOWSKI. 84. Forest Glen. 

Emp 3-28-23, Died 4-4-85 
CHARLEY BULL1E. 90. Shops & Equip . 

Emp 3-16-43, Died 3-26-85 
RUTH E BUSSE. 81, Payroll Acctg . 

Emp 5-1-24, Died 4-6-85 
FRANK A CESAFSKY, 81, Shops & Equip , 

Emp 12-19-29. Died 3-3-85 
ROBERT J CIESLA, 72. North Park. 

Emp 5-5-42. Died 4-19-85 
RUPERT T CRABB. 63, Forest Glen, 

Emp 10-30-58. Died 4-6-85 
STEPHEN A CULLOTON. 84. North Section 

Emp 2 14-45, Died 4 2 85 
JOSEPH H DRAUS, 81, Shops & Equip , 

Emp 2-20-29. Died 4-3-85 
PAUL P DUCAR. 74. South Section. 

Emp 4 11-41. Died 4-19-85 
DANIEL C EIERDAM, 81, Lawndale, 

Emp 12-5-21, Died 4-28-85 
PETER J FOTOPOULOS. 92. Shops & 

Equip. Emp 9-20-13, Died 4 17-85 
TOBBIE P GOWANS, 58. South Shops. 

Emp 3 9 61. Died 4 19-85 
HARRY G HACKBARTH, 79. Archer. 

Emp 10-27-33. Died 3-25-85 
EDWARD HERATY, 84, Office Services, 

Emp 3-3-23, Died 1985 



LOWELL G HOBBS. 83. 77th Street. 

Emp 10-5-25. Died 3-27 85 
HUBERT L JONES. 57. Lawndale, 

Emp. 11-1-56, Died 4-9-85 
EDWARD R JOYCE, 71. Oper Planning, 

Emp 8-18-69, Died 4-14-85 
FRANK T KARL, 75. North Park. 

Emp 4-14-43, Died 4-16-85 
WALTER H LUBBEN, 81, West Section. 

Emp 11-22-22, Died 4-17-85 
JOHN P O'CONNOR, 60, Oper Planning, 

Emp 6-5-46, Died 4-22-85 
JOSEPH P O'CONNOR. 76, 52nd Street. 

Emp 1-11-28, Died 4-14-85 
IGNATIUS P OSHAUGHNESSY, 86, 

Electrical, Emp 3-8-18. Died 1-19-85 
DANIEL F PRISBLE. 71, North Park. 

Emp 7-28-42, Died 4-28-85 
JOSEPH W REDER, 82, North Section. 

Emp 7 21-27. Died 4-10-85 
ROLLA L RENTFRO. 91, Shops & Equip . 

Emp 12-12-44, Died 4-6-85 
MARGARET B ROCHFORD, 84, Transportation, 

Emp, 5-28-42, Died 4-5-85 
MICHAEL J RYAN. 93, 77lh Street, 

Emp 4-1015. Died 1 31-85 
GEORGE SLADEK. 75, Shops & Equip , 

Emp 6-30-45, Died 4-29-85 
SIMON K STENBERG, 85. Shops & Equip . 

Emp 8-28 29, Died 4 22-85 
RALPH TALARICO, 94. Kedzie. 

Emp. 3-24-20, Died 4-12-85 
HERBERT TEMPLEMAN, 92. West Section. 

Emp 4-28-30. Died 4-3 85 



JAMES T WELTON, 72, Skokie. 

Emp. 5-15-44. Died 4-10-85 
WINFRED W WILSON. 79, Kedzie, 

Emp 8-15-42. Died 3-1-85 
VICTOR ZASTERA, 69, Plant Main! . 

Emp. 5-6-37, Died 4-5-85 



April 



JOHN W BURKE, 86, 61st Street, 

Emp, 2-11-24, Died 3-9-85 
ANTHONY CARDIFF. 89. Forest Glen. 

Emp 7-24-23. Died 3-26-85 
JOSEPH M CHAZINSKI. 72. North Avenue 

Emp 8-25-42. Died 3-22-85 
JULIAN CICHON, 74. Electrical, 

Emp 4-6-39. Died 3-27-85 
PATRICK J CLARKE, 79. Engineering, 

Emp 10-17-47, Died 3-1-85 
ARTHUR E CONOBOY. 80, Howard Street, 

Emp 7-26-48. Died 3 10-85 
ANTON V DAHL. 82. Limits. 

Emp 11-10-36. Died 2-7-85 
GEORGE W FROST. 93. North Section. 

Emp 1-23-15. Died 3 13-85 
PATRICK HARRINGTON. 94. Kedzie. 

Emp 3-11-26, Died 3-27-85 
MAURICE G HOWELL, 79, North Park, 

Emp 2-16-42, Died 3 1-85 
ELMER JOHNSON. 91, Shops & Equipment, 

Emp 8-16-24. Died 3-11 85 
CATHERINE F KENNY. 87, 

Emp 11 12-42. Died 3-3-85 
PETER J KLEIN. 89, Armitage. 

Emp 1-14-29. Died 3-22-85 



GEORGE P KUBANDA. 68. Forest Glen. 

Emp 7-18-46. Died 3-28-85 
ADOLPH KUNZ. 78. Shops & Equipment. 

Emp. 12-9-52. Died 3-15-85 
THOMAS KURTZER. 89. Claim. 

Emp 6-19-29. Died 3-28-85 
FRED A LESLIE. 82, Transportation, 

Emp 2-20-42, Died 3-31-85 
CATHERINE P McALLISTER, 69. Sr Clerk, 

Emp. 11-8-43, Died 3-9-85 
LOUIS R MENKEN. 79. West Section. 

Emp. 1-16-43. Died 3-5-85 
EUGENE J MERSKI. 81. Archer. 

Emp 2-27-45. Died 12 25-84 
LESTER R NORMAN. 79. South Section. 

Emp 8-2-43, Died 3-26 85 
EDWIN H PLATH. 73. North Section. 

Emp. 10-5-40. Died 3-16-85 
CHARLES PLATT. 75. Forest Glen, 

Emp. 6-7-51. Died 3-20-85 
RUBEN W RAZOR. 69. Oper Plnng . 

Emp 12-31-64. Died 3-16-85 
LEWIS W REED. 62. Transportation. 

Emp. 4-19-51, Died 3-22-85 
RALPH R REGNIER, 74, Executive. 

Emp 11-17-36. Died 3-25-85 
FRANK E RUND, 78, Stores. 

Emp 2-1-28. Died 3-11-85 
CHARLES G SIMPSON. 82. 61st Street. 

Emp 4-11 44. Died 3-9-85 
CHARLES J VLASEK. 73. West Section, 

Emp 2-1-74. Died 3 20-85 
CHARLES J WEHRSTEIN. 74. North Sect . 

Emp 10-23-45, Died 3-11-85 



22 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



-rAi mwi mm 



NHS... The United Brotherhood of Carpenters. Local 1027, 
had a dinner dance on May 17 at the Delphian House in 
Oak Lawn. The dance was a total success and several 
carpenters received pins for the many years of membership. 
Frank Bartos, a CTA carpenter, received a pin for 30 
years of membership. On arrival at the Hall. James 
Kasmer Jr. and his wife were distributing corsages to all the 
women and billfolds to the men. Seating arrangements were 
left up to the diners; three tables, among 500 other seats, 
were occupied by CTA Carpenters. The blessing before din- 
ner was nicely given by a CTA carpenter--Vito Skorupski 
then came the prime rib, and then dancing. The "John 
Travolta" of the dance floor was CTA carpenter Bob 
Hazard... The Community Affairs staff participated in the 
"Fight Graffiti" parade, which kicked off a campaign for a 
Beautiful Chicago. Thanks for representing the CTA in such 
a worthwhile cause!.. Happy third wedding anniversary to 
Rose (Labor Relations) and Kevin McGuire. We wish you 
many, many more!.. Welcome back to Mike Lacriola. 
Mike and his wife were vacationing in Las Vegas. Mike said 
the weather was in the 90's, and he really enjoyed the pool 
during the day. Evenings were spent wining and dining with 
his wife... Joseph Eugene Cappelletti Jr. graduated 
from Loyola University 
cum laude with a B.A. in 
managerial accounting. He 
is a distinguished military 
graduate with a commis- 
sion to second lieutenant in 
the U.S. Army, Field Ar- 
tillery. His father, Joseph 
A. Cappelletti Sr., Ac 
counts Payable, is mighty 
proud of Joe. Congratula- 
tions! 

Carol MuStO Joseph E. Cappelleti Jr. 

Management Information Systems 

The Quality Assurance group has a couple of busy 
beavers. Both Bill Ehrler and Pat Glines (your new In- 
side News Reporter) are involved in volunteer work. Bill has 
put in a lot of time and effort establishing a neighborhood 
block watch; he is on their steering committee, has recently 
contributed an article to the Near Northwest Neighborhood 
Network (newsletter) , and is drumming up customers for the 
Bucktown Art Fair in August. You'll hear about me in our 
next column... We are wishing Tom Wodarski, Systems 
Development Project Maintenance, a speedy recovery after 
undergoing quadruple by-pass surgery in April. He's doing 
well and at home now, and getting bored. Hope he has a 
quick recovery... While on the subject of health, congratula- 
tions are in order for those who have recently quit smoking 
Will Bill Ehrler, John Miller (I/O Control), Andy Riz- 
zuto (Hardware), and Linda Williams (I/O Control), 
please take a bow? However, in not smoking, some have 
gained weight. Now it's exercise time. What 
willpower!.. Happy Days! Congratulations to Steven 
Gossage, Software, who married Barbara Bradley on 
June 8, 1985. They honeymooned in the Pocono Moun- 
tains and at Niagara Falls. (Watch your step in those high 
places.) We'll be looking forward to hearing about the 
highlights of the trip (only the mentionable portion) when he 




gets back. ..Your reporter and Jeanne Malenki (Produc 

tion Control) have both finished their winter bowling season 1 " 
on East Side's Rolaline Bowling Alley. Jeanne's team came 
in third; mine was in last place. Jeanne's team had to bowl a 
tie-breaker and lost. So, as the saying goes, better luck next 
year. Her team has the potential, since they were in first 
place until the last few weeks. Now that bowling season is 
over, Jeanne is leaving for a trip to Piano. Texas, to visit her 
son. Ron, and his family. Her three-year-old grand- 
daughter, Linnea, is the light of her life, and Grandma 
gives her everything she can in the Cabbage Patch motif. 
Jeanne will be living the Life of Riley relaxing in the sun, so 
we'll all be envious when she gets back with a tan. Where 
did I put that sun lamp?.. Barry Howard, Production Con- 
trol, just came back from a week's vacation. Two days were 
spent in bed ill, and then two days playing Mr. Mom while 
his wife was sick. What a way to spend a vacation. Who's 
your travel agent, anyway?.. Bruce Weeks, Production 
Control, is busy in his spare time now that the Softball 
season has begun. In his first game, the team lost 9-2. His 
wife, Joan, probably will not see him until the football 
season starts and that's only because he'll be watching the 
games on TV... Your reporter was all excited when she won 
two tickets to see Crystal Gale at the Holiday Star Inn on 
May 19. She won by being the 15th caller on US99 radio 
station. Crystal Gale was fabulous! 

Pat Glines 

Forest Glen (Repairs) 

Wedded bliss: Ken Hanna, bus placer, and Joanne 
LeCara were united in Holy Matrimony on April 13. 
Joanne is the daughter of Frank LeCara, night foreman. 
The happy couple honeymooned in Hawaii... Baseball 
season has begun with three of our co-workers participating: 
Ray Brennan is coaching his second year for the Midget 
League at Durnham Park. His son. Ray, plays various posi- 
tions in the league. Sal Furlin is in his sixth year and is 
coaching the Bronco A's out of Mt. Prospect. Louis Chat- 
tard is now coaching a Colt League team in Lake County 
sponsored by The Zion Merchants. Last year he coached in 
a Pony League and won the Eastern Division, posting an 
11-3 record. Good luck to the coaches and players! 

John W. Kochopolus 

Harlem Shop 

Repairmen Arnold Tucknott and Joe Milke are both 
proud new fathers, as their wives gave birth to beautiful 
future CTA leaders. Arnold and his wife. Mary, had a 
beautiful baby girl. Candace Nicole, on May 14. weighing 
in at 7 pounds. 11 ounces. Joe and Terri Milke welcomed 
Brian Raymond, weighing in at 7 pounds. 13 ounces, on 
May 21 Frank Chiappetta retired June 1 after 35 years 
at Ffarlem Shop. A party and send-off was held at JFW Hall 
on Desplaines avenue in Riverside Good luck. 
Frank!.. Harlem Shop Foreman Al Cranford enjoyed a 
week of fishing and R&R in beautiful Chattanooga. Ten- 
nessee (with friend Dolly Parton?). Kevin M. Kincaid 
graduated with honors from Lincoln Jr. High School. Ber- 
wyn Proud father William, a servicer at Harlem, and wife 
Jacqueline, gifted Kevin with a four-week all-expenses- 
paid vacation in beautiful Ireland. Congratulations. Kevin! 

Mike McGuinness 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 5 & 6 



23 



Claims and Union 

representative 

O'Rourke retires 

Timothy O'Rourke (right), claims representative and 
veteran union representative for general office employees 
of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 241, accepts con- 
gratulations and best wishes upon his retirement after 39 
years of CTA service. Bidding adieu is Edward Mitchell, 
director, Technical Services, Data Control, as Don 
Wardell, director, Claims Management, looks on. 
O'Rourke joined CTA's Transportation Department in 
October 1946 as a conductor/bus operator. He was 
assigned to 77th Street where he remained until he 
became a traffic checker in 1950. 
In August 1960 he joined the Claim Department as a 
statement man. In the next 25 years, O'Rourke held key 
positions in the Claim Department until his May 1 

retirement. 







CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT NO. 8021 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



lei Transit News 



Vol.38, No. 7, 1985/ For Chicago Transit Authority Employees and Retirees 



T 





NRR 



WIPE OUT 



Qrqffitf- 




\ 



L 



J 



- 




L. IV 




c 



hildren, teenagers, and adults are 
playing a new, and in many cases 
gang-related, game in Chicago called 
"Graffiti Tag," and CTA is "it." During 
the past few months, there has been 
an outburst of graffiti and vandalism 
on buses, trains, stations, and other 
facilities, and CTA is getting ready to 
fight back. 

Chairman Cardilli recently an- 
nounced CTA's new "Wipe Out Graf- 
fiti" campaign, designed to rid CTA 
vehicles and property of this ugly and 
expensive mess. This new campaign is 



a two-fold program, designed to pro- 
vide both preventive and punitive 
education. 



Preventive Education 

CTA's Public Affairs department will 
involve Chicago area students in a 
program of education to prevent graf- 
fiti. A series of contests designed to 
challenge students' creativity and 
solicit their ideas concerning the 
seriousness of the crime of graffiti, are 
now being prepared for implementa- 
tion when school begins. 

A radio "Rappin" contest including 
junior high school and high school 
students from public and parochial 



schools is scheduled to begin in late 
summer. "Rappin" is the technique of 
talking quickly and rhythmically to 
music. Student listeners will be asked 
to submit 30-second tapes with their 
graffiti "raps" to the radio station. A 
CTA-appointed committee and 
representatives from the radio station 
will choose five finalists. Their tapes 
will be played on the air, and listeners 
will be asked to phone in and vote for 
the best "rap." Prizes yet to be deter- 
mined will be awarded to the winner 
and four runners-up. 

The Community Affairs depart- 
ment, through cooperation with the 
Chicago Board of Education and the 
Archdiocese of Chicago, will conduct 
essay, poster, and slogan contests 
designed to help "Wipe Out Graffiti." 

Community Affairs will also tour the 
school system with the "Other Side" 
bus in order to stimulate interest and 
appreciation of the graffiti problem. 
One side of this bus will be clean, and 



WIPE OUT 




Three graffiti offenders, escorted to Limits garage by Chicago Police Department 
juvenile officers, remove graffiti from a bus. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



the "Other Side" will be filled with 
graffiti inside and out. Students will be 
invited to tour the bus, and they will be 
given a brief explanation of the graffiti 
problem and the opportunity to at- 
tempt to remove some of the graffiti. 



Punitive Education 

CTA and the Chicago Police 
Department are also using punitive 
measures to try to stop offenders from 
making a pigsty of our transit system, 
and to teach offenders that it takes a 
lot longer to clean off the mess than it 
took them to put it on. A recent 
change in the Illinois Juvenile Code 
allows youth officers to offer juveniles 
arrested in graffiti cases the option of 
appearing in Juvenile Court on 
charges of damage to property or, if 
youths and parents agree, to do public 
service work in the neighborhoods 
where their arrests occurred. 

Since June, police officers have 



been escorting juvenile offenders to 
CTA bus garages and other CTA loca- 
tions. Using rubber gloves and a 
special non-toxic graffiti remover, 
groups of two or three offenders make 
restitution for their crimes by removing 
all graffiti from a CTA bus. The pro- 
cess takes a considerable amount of 
time and a lot of elbow grease, and 
hopefully discourages repeat of- 
fenders. 

CTA is spending an estimated 
$400,000 per year to remove graffiti. 
We hope to eliminate graffiti com- 
pletely in the near future, but, until 
then, let those who are caught writing 
graffiti be the ones to do the clean-up 
work... not CTA employees. 

Through its double-edged program 
of preventive and punitive education. 
the "Wipe Out Graffiti" program will 
be an excellent example of coopera- 
tion between public and private agen- 
cies to serve the needs of the com- 
munity, eta 




From the Chairman 
Fighting back 

During recent months we have been 
under attack by those who 
thoughtlessly deface the transit en- 
vironment that has been a source of 
pride for Chicagoans and admiration 
for visitors from other large cities. Our 
Maintenance Department has worked 
diligently, and at great expense, to 
remove graffiti as it occurs; but they 
can no longer keep pace, because 
contemporary graffiti taggers measure 
success by the number of "tags" they 
can make throughout the city, rather 
than the need to express any in- 
telligent social statement. CTA and the 
City of Chicago are fed up with this ig- 
norant disrespect for property, and we 
are starting to fight back. 

1 congratulate our legislators for 
amending the Illinois Juvenile Code, 
which now allows the police to put 
juvenile graffiti offenders to work 
cleaning the mess that has been 
created by their kind, and I applaud 
the new programs of the CTA Public 
Affairs and Community Relations 
Departments, which will reach out to 
the neighborhoods and the schools to 
re-educate young people concerning 
respect for property. All CTA 
employees must be concerned about 
the cleanliness of our system. I thank 
those of you who have reported in- 
cidents that have lead to the arrest of 
graffiti perpetrators, and I thank the 
Chicago Police Department for strict 
and rapid enforcement of the law. 

Our search for missing children con- 
tinues, and I welcome the Checker 
Taxi and Yellow Cab companies and 
the Lerner Newspapers who are join- 
ing our efforts to inform the public 
about children who are missing. Since 
our transit advertising program started 
in February, 10 children have been 
located, and this increased level of 
publicity can only produce more 
positive results. Also, I thank radio sta- 
tions WJMK-FM and WJJD-AM for 
their sponsorship of the expanded 
fingerprint bus program which will 
enable parents to safeguard their 
children with fingerprint and 
photographic records provided by the 
Chicago Police Department. The miss- 
ing children program is an excellent 
example of public and private agencies 
working together to solve a serious 
social problem. 




Transit News is published for employees and retirees of CTA • Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Department, Bill 
Baxa, Manager • Director of Publications: Jack Sowchin; Editor: Rick Willis • Graphic Designers: A. V. Eiva and Alan Grady • 
Contributing Writers: Helene Greiman, Jeff Stern, Don Yabush • Typesetting ,and printing provided by the Management Services 
Department • Distributed free of charge to all active and retired CTA employees • Annual subscription price to others, $5 • 
CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Merchandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, IL 60654. 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 



Corner 



Wayne Wardlow (Kedzie 
garage) is appreciated by 
riders of his No. 16 Lake bus. 
Ora Young, of Oak Park, 
wrote, "He is an outstanding 
young man. When you enter 
the bus, there is always a 
warm, friendly smile and a 
'Good morning' or 'How are 
you?' He is dedicated to his 
job, and is always nice to 
everyone, young and old alike. 
He is one in a million. I am 
sure his parents played a key 
role in his training. He is one 
young man who is serving 
mankind with authority and 
love. He has to love his job to 
give such a good perform- 
ance. All I can say is keep up 
the good work and keep on 
driving." 



Leon Davis (77th Street garage) was thanked for his 
courtesy as operator of a No. 3 King Drive bus by Matt 
Bullard, of Harbor Point Drive. "I had jumped off a 
westbound Blue Island bus that was right ahead. The 
operator saw me wave, made a quick stop for me, and 
still made the light. And I got to work on time. I moved 
here from the West Coast last fall. On the strength of 
reports we had heard about the CTA system, we sold 
all three of our cars before moving, a decision we have 
had no cause to regret. I have been impressed with the 
friendliness and helpfulness of most of the people I've 
met in Chicago, and naturally I think operator 7685 is 
an asset not only to CTA, but to me and the City of 
Chicago as well." 

North Section conductor Richard Corbett and 
motorman John Kirsch were commended by David 
Marshall, of North Campbell Avenue, for apprehen- 
ding a pickpocket on a Ravenswood train. "At Fuller- 
ton two suspicious-looking males blocked the doorway 
for a moment. I had just gotten off the train when 
another man who had been behind me cried out that 
his wallet was gone. Your crew immediately stopped 
the train, and the conductor caught the 16-year-old 
who had the man's wallet. He put up quite a fight. The 
motorman helped him subdue the youth, and together 
they held him until the police finally arrived some 30 
minutes later." 

Rosa Irizarry (Forest Glen garage) was praised by 
J. Valchen, of Peterson Avenue, who was a rider on 
her No. 84 Peterson bus. "I am 70 years young, and 
have been riding buses for a long time. For the first 
time in many months, I had a smooth ride. This gal 
handled the bus beautifully -- no jerking of the brakes, 
and I didn't have to hold on for fear of falling down. 
How I wish there were more bus drivers like her! It 
would be a pleasure to ride buses, and I wouldn't be so 
shaken up." 




Joel Larkins (North Section) 
was the conductor of a 
Howard train ridden by 
Patrick Graber, who works on 
East Randolph Drive. He 
distinguished himself by his 
professionalism. His an- 
nouncements were clearly 
enunciated so as to be 
understood by all. He also 
showed himself to be 
thoroughly knowledgeable of 
the city and of interconnect- 
ing lines. He not only an- 
nounced each stop, but also 
gave pertinent information as 
to local points of interest. 
When the train came to a stop 
just before Washington, the 
conductor immediately an- 
nounced what the situation 
was, and courteously thanked 
all riders for their patience." 



Lee Thompson (North Park garage) was the 
operator of a No. 147 Outer Drive Express bus ridden 
by Pat Burns, who was in Chicago on business from 
Tucson, Arizona. "His professional image and his con- 
cern for his passengers were helpful and very efficient. 
We could clearly understand street names called out. 
He watched where he stopped so as not to cause harm 
to people getting off or on . An elderly lady was on the 
street waiting for the bus, and he stopped far enough 
back so as not to startle her. Once she was on board, 
he warned her gently about staying back, as she could 
lose her balance and fall in front of the bus." 

Billy Ragsdale (77th Street garage) was com- 
plimented by Timetra Adams, of East 74th Street, for 
"reaching out and being nice to people" on a No. 6 
Jeffery Express bus. "I was greeted with a 'Good mor- 
ning, Love. Welcome to the Love Bus.' As I continued 
to ride, I noticed everyone entering the bus received 
this greeting, and everyone leaving was told, 'Be 
careful, watch your step, and have a good day.' Peo- 
ple as a rule are not friendly toward strangers, but the 
passengers on this bus were turning and chatting with 
the person next to them, and were smiling at each 
other on a glance, instead of glaring or frowning." 

Jeff Anderson (Forest Glen garage) was applaud- 
ed by C. E. Morris, of Forest Glen Avenue, for his 
consideration as operator of a No. 84 Peterson bus. 
"The driver held his westbound bus until a lady and I 
who were stranded on the median strip by a long line 
of traffic were able to cross the street and board. It was 
raining at the time. A few minutes later the driver took 
time at Kimball Avenue to help a blind lady off the bus 
and safely across the street so she could board a south- 
bound bus. This considerate attitude for the welfare of 
his passengers impressed me greatly and is worthy of 
commendation." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Day in CTA honorees get an explanation of how things 
operate in the Control Center as bus controller Linda 
Hopps takes them on a tour. The group includes (from left) 
William Davidson, motorman, Howard terminal; 



Roland Michalak, ticket agent. Forest Park; Joel 
Hawthorne, conductor, Ashland; and Isabelo Pagan, 

conductor, Howard terminal 
controller John Batzel. 



< rapid transit emcees 



Seated at the console is bus 

honored 



J l wo rapid transit employees as- 
signed to Howard terminal, an 
Ashland terminal conductor, and a 
Forest Park ticket agent received 
special recognition on "A Day in CTA" 
for having distinguished themselves in 
four separate emergency rescue efforts 
which either saved a life or averted fur- 
ther tragedy. 

Conductor Isabelo Pagan was 
honored for coming to the aid of a 
gunshot victim on the North-South 
route recently. Pagan, who joined 
CTA last August 21, witnessed the 
shooting at University station and 
rushed to the man's aid after calling 
the Control Center. He not only 



assisted the victim until an ambulance 
and police arrived, but made court ap- 
pearances in connection with the inci- 
dent. 

Conductor Joel Hawthorne, a 
member of the 1984 Roundhouse 18, 
called for the power to be cut after he 
observed a man jump from the plat- 
Jorm to the tracks approximately 50 
feet in front of his train in an apparent 
suicide attempt. 

Hawthorne rushed to the man with 
words of encouragement, and helped 
him from the tracks. The conductor 
stayed with the man until an am- 
bulance and police arrived. 

In a similar incident on the North- 



TWUfor a job WELL DONE! 



South route at Granville, Motorman 
William Davidson brought his train 
to a safe stop and notified the Control 
Center when he saw a man on the 
tracks. 

Police and firemen were notified, 
but arrived too late to save the man's 
life. However, Operations officials said 
Davidson's alertness and attention to 
duty avoided a more serious situation 
and minimized delay of service. 

A Forest Park ticket agent. Roland 
Michalak, was also the recipient of 
"Day in CTA" recognition for having 
foiled an attempted robbery. The alert 
Michalak denied two youthful would- 
be robbers with a deception which 
prevented them from escaping with 
CTA revenue. eta 

Employees who have received Com- 
mendations from the public. 



Mohammed Ajamt, North Park 
Am par o Alvarez, Forest Glen 
Robert Arellano, Howard Kimball 

Karonnese Banks. Howard, Kimball 
Nathaniel Barton, 77th Street 
Gall Beck, North Park 
Samuel Bevelle, North Park 
Thomas Bonner, North Park 
Junior Broadbent, Forest Glen 
Arthur Broadway Jr.. 77th Street 
Cornell Brown, 77th Street 
Thomas Brown, Archer 
Jonather Bruce. 77th Street 
Earl Bun-ess, 69th Street 
Robert Byrd, North Park 

George Calhoun. 69th Street 
Vlrble Caples. 69th Street 
Glenn Carpenter, Archer 
Edwin Carrero. Archer 
Anthony Certale. Forest Glen 
Alonzo Claybon. 69th Street 
Felicia Clower, Limits 
David Copeland. Kedzte 



Minnie Davis. North Avenue 
Michael Deely, North Avenue 
Angel DeLaPaz, Forest Glen 
Robert Devltt. North Park 
Lawrence Duda, Limits 
Melvln Dukes. North Avenue 
Robert Dunning, Limits 

Hezzle Edwards, 77th Street 
Schenon Edwards. b9th Street 

Lourdes Ftgueroa. North Avenue 
Eddie Flgueroa. North Park 

Gonzalo Garcia. North Paik 
George Gavrllos. North Park 
Grover Germany. North Park 
Leonard Glbbs 111. North Park 
Barbara Gllllsple. Archer 
Anna Gonzales, North Section 
Mary Gulce. North Park 

Elite Head. 69th Street 
Cecelia Hendrlckson. 
Vernon Hill. Howard Kimball 



Mary Holt. Limits 

Marlene Horsby. North Section 

Kenneth Hull, Beverly 

Roberto Jacobson, Howard Kiml- 

Waymon Jeffrey, Beverly 

Jerry Jenkins, Archer 

Charles Jessie. Limits 

Lewis Johnson. 77th St reft 

Cedrlc Johnson. Kedzie 

Martin Johnson. North Park 

Eddie Jones. ' 

Betty Jones. Limits 

Francene Jones. He-ward Kimb.il 

Bernardino Juarez. Limits 

Robert Kremer. N * ' 

Fred Labern. North Avenue 
George Lantz. Forest Glen 
Luther Lewis. Beverly 
Irving Lewis. 69th Street 
Hollls Lewis Jr., 
Walter Lewis Jr.. North Park 
Robert Lucas. Kedzie 



John March Jr , I ■■■■-'. 
William Markowski. Fori 
Robert Martinez. N 
Calvin McCants. 69th Street 



Gregory Shelby. I 

John Slfuentes. Hovt n 

Kathleen Sims. I 

Roberto Slot*, I 
Earnest McElwee Jr., Howard Kimball Barbara Sullivan. I 
Donald Mlnefee. 69th Street 

Angel MoJIca. North Park J"V Thompson. 69 

Ubaldo Munoz. North Park Blanca Ton.* 

Jeff Turner 

Michael Newkirk. K< 

Steve Nlcpon. I Clarence VanMlddle.worth. Jorth Park 



John Paczkouski 
James Parker. 
Lynda Parker. Limits 
Frederick Pepke 
Ramiro Perez. Archer 
Charles Peterson. 
Richard Power. 

Billy Ragsdale. 
John Reynolds. 
Kenneth Richards. 

RobeM Hoberson. th Street 
Tony Robinson 



Wayne Watdlou 
Javld Watson. 
DeLoU West. 
Walter White. 
Frederick White 
Patricia Williams 
Russell Williams. A 
Waldrldge WllhcnpOOn 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 




tMggie 104 IF 



Kimberly Halbisch (Left) and 

Valina Lynn Laabs (right) show mixed 
reactions to fingerprinting performed by 
Officer Gene Jaglowski. ► 



c 



TA historical bus No. 3407 was a 
feature attraction at WJMK Magic 104 
FM's "Day at the Races" on Sunday, 
June 30, at Santa Fe Speedway in the 
southwest suburb of Willow Springs. 
CTA Public Affairs, the Chicago Police 
Department, and Magic 104 provided 
free fingerprint registry for children as 
part of the growing CTA/CPD Missing 
Children Program, which began in 
February 1985 by providing informa- 
tion about missing children through 
monthly posting of car card advertising 
in CTA vehicles. 

The "Day at the Races" opened at 
11 a.m. with a Historic Street and 
Race Car Show including 75 cars, 
most of 1950's and 1960's vintage. At 
2 p.m.. Magic 104 presented the Ron- 
nie Rice Show in the main bandstand; 
and the "Magic 104 Race" began at 6 
p.m., featuring Late Model, Sports- 
man, Lightning Rod, and Street Stock 
car races. 

As a co-sponsor of the event, CTA 
displayed bus No. 3407 and two mini- 
buses from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. 
Display space near the main band- 
stand, valued at $5,000, was donated 
by Magic 104 FM, which also broad- 
cast promotional announcements dur- 
ing the week before the event. 

At the request of their parents, 85 
children were fingerprinted and 
photographed. Parents received their 
children's fingerprint cards and 
polaroid photographs, which could be 
used by police in case of emergency, 
and CTA/CPD brochures with mis- 
sing children photos and missing per- 




sons safety tips. Each child also re- 
ceived a helium-filled balloon bearing 
a distinctive fingerprint and magnifying 
glass symbol, and the slogans "WE 
CARE," and "I've been (finger- 
printed)." The symbol was also 
displayed on 12-foot-long display 
signs mounted on the sides of bus No. 
3407. 

The children were fingerprinted by 
Officers Taya D. Sun and Gene 
Jaglowski, Preventive Programs 
Division, Bureau of Community Ser- 
vices, CPD. Officer Jack Campione, 
Youth Division, Bureau of In- 
vestigative Services, CPD, CTA 
Publications Director Jack Sowchin, 
CTA Promotional Services Represen- 
tative Helene Greiman, and Media 
Buyer Laura Hangren from Santa Fe 
Speedway registered children and 
filled balloons with helium. Ken 
Paulin, Promotion/Marketing Direc- 
tor, and Judy Spitzer, Assistant Pro- 
motion/Marketing Director, both from 
Magic 104, photographed children 
with a polaroid camera and film 
donated by Shutan Camera. 

Jimmy Johnson, operator of bus 
No. 3407 from Washington Garage, 
helped throughout the day by showing 
people through the bus, and especially 
by helping parents clean fingerprinting 
ink from their children's fingers. 
Graphics for the missing children pro- 
gram were designed by Alan Grady, 
CTA Publications Section. Special 
thanks to the Paint Shop, South 
Shops, under the direction of foreman 
Winmon Lewis, for producing the 
silk-screened sign used on bus No. 
3407, and to Washington Garage 



Maintenance, under the direction of 
superintendent of Maintenance Willie 
Wong, for their help with this project. 

CTA's historical fingerprint bus also 
appeared in the Evanston Fourth of 
July parade. After the parade, 
Evanston police fingerprinted 85 more 
children during the suburb's Fourth of 
July celebration. Arrangements were 
made by Steve Schlickman, CTA 
Intergovernmental Affairs Officer, who 
was also assistant celebration manager 
for Evanston's Fourth of July activities. 

Beginning August 1, CTA, the 
Chicago Police Department, WJMK 
Magic 104 FM, WJJD 1160 AM, 
Shutan Camera, and Lerner 
Newspapers will co-sponsor more ac- 
tivities in support of the missing 
children program. For their"Kid Lost" 
program. Magic 104 and the CPD will 
use a modern CTA bus to visit shop- 
ping centers, neighborhood events, 
and schools to promote fingerprint 
registry and photographing services. 
Magic 104 and Lerner Newspapers 
will promote the events, and Lerner 
Newspapers will begin printing photos 
of missing children weekly in their 
neighborhood newspapers. Magic 104 
will also operate a 24-hour telephone 
hotline for information about missing 
children, using the special phone 
number K-l-D-L-O-S-T. 

CTA and the Chicago Police 
Department welcome the increased 
cooperation and support for the mis- 
sing children program. These efforts 
will make it easier to locate missing 
children, and they will inform parents 
of things that they can do to help in- 
sure the safety of their children. Ct3 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 







llhJ 



K 





Pleou*! 

"e'p us find 
our children fc 



A After fingerprinting. Kimberly Halbisch poses for 

polaroid photo taken by Ken Paulin of Magic 104 FM. 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 




Your Health 



Diabetes and the cost of Health 

Care : 
Safeguards you can take today 



r resumbaly, as life expectancy in- 
creases so have the number of post 
retirement years. This good fortune 
has a penalty, however, by placing a 
financial burden on years of fixed in- 
come. Similarly, as post retirement 
years increase, one must devote more 
time to measures that will safeguard 
health in the years to come . Of course , 
if we put off such measures, high 
technology may supply us with 
miraculous cures for an assortment of 
illnesses; or will it? 

No doubt technology has con- 
tributed to our prolonged survival. 
With the advent of intensive care 
units, we can have some chance of 
surviving heart attacks. To prevent a 
second heart attack, we can have 
bypass coronary surgery. With the 
technology of dialysis, we can even 
survive kidney failure from years of 
untreated hypertension. 

Technology has also increased our 
cost of living. These many and 
wonderful developments are heaped 
onto the cost of health insurance and 
dollar amounts paid by the consumer- 
patient. Thus, the blessings of 
technology are mixed, especially for 
those forced to live within a fixed in- 
come. Therefore, the answers for 
health care in the future must be 
technology, in part, and also preven- 
tive health care. 

Diabetes 

Of the greater than 250 million peo- 



ple in the U.S., approximately 12 
million are diabetic. Some take 
medication; some are treated with diet 
alone; and millions are unaware that 
they have diabetes. Most of these have 
few or no symptoms, and likely will 
only become aware of their diabetic 
status when they develop a complica- 
tion. Almost none of these complica- 
tions can be cured. 

Contrary to popular belief, most 
diabetics do not experience major 
weakness, weight loss, excessive thirst 
or urination. Instead, they may have 
vague nonspecific symptoms or, in 
fact, may feel quite well. 

Diabetics may be overweight, but 
are often only mildly so, and can be 
lean. Blurring of vision may be noted 
but more frequently is not a problem. 
Therefore, a lack of symptoms is no 
guarantee of wellness, especially 
wellness from diabetes. 

People usually seek attention and 
have diabetes diagnosed after a com- 
plication has developed — generally 
10 or more years after the fact. Pro- 
blems frequently encountered at this 
stage are: numbness or pain in a foot 
or leg, impotency, fluid retention, fail- 
ing vision, light-headedness on stan- 
ding, or gangrene of a foot. Occa- 
sionally earlier signs become apparent 
that can be helped, including fungal 
infections of the skin, recurrent yeast 
infections of the vagina and/or genital 
area, rapid weight loss, and infertility 
or repeated miscarriages. 



Hedging your bet 

Obviously, if there are no totally 
reliable early warning signs that will 
work for all of us, the question of 
when and how often to check with 
your doctor becomes a tough one. To 
help weigh the odds, there are certain 
risk factors we can evaluate. 

Most adult diabetics have a genetic 
influence, such as a family member 
who had diabetes. Thus, if you have 
one or more family members in direct 
line who are diabetic, your risks are 
greatly increased. 

Although obesity does not cause 
diabetes, it represents a stress to your 
body and may make hidden (or well- 
controlled) diabetes much worse. 
Steroids, certain types of water pills, 
and several other drugs also can com- 
plicate diabetes. 

Conclusion 

In the future, technology will likely 
yield a treatment that will compensate 
for basic deficiencies in the diabetic 
state, and will be a bargain at any 
price. The treatment of its complica- 
tions, however, will remain expensive 
and largely inadequate. As a result, 
the complications will be best treated 
by early detection and prevention. An 
effective effort to safeguard your 
health should be started today. 

Thomas L. Pitts, M.D. 



Diabetes testing is scheduled for November 



k ccording to the American Diabetes 
Association (ADA), about one in 
every 20 people have diabetes. Ap- 
proximately one million have insulin- 
dependent, or type one diabetes while 
11 million people have non-insulin- 
dependent, or type two diabetes. 

Unfortunately, an estimated five 
million people have type two diabetes 



and do not know it, reports ADA. The 
people most at risk for type two 
diabetes are over 40, overweight, and 
have a history of diabetes. Anyone 
with these characteristics should see a 
doctor perodically to be tested for the 
disease. 

Last year 13,000 Illinoisans par- 
ticipated in The American Diabetes 



Association's free screening program 
conducted at local hospital and clinics. 
The screening is scheduled again for 
November 1985, "National Diabetes 
Month." CTA employees, families and 
friends who may be interested in par- 
ticipating in this year's "Diabetes 
Detection" program should contact 
the Northern Illinois Affiliate of the 
ADA in October for details, 346-1805. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



North Park maintenance 
takes Roadeo, Fleet honors 



William Rafferty, a member of 
the 1984 Maintenance Roadeo first 
place team at Forest Glen garage, 
changed work locations and took his 
winning ways to the North Park 
maintenance garage where the 1985 
first place trophy is being awarded. 

Willie Wong, maintenance unit 
supervisor at Washington garage, and 
the 1985 maintenance Roadeo chair- 
man, said maintenance foreman Raf- 
ferty finished the course in four 
minutes and three seconds. The max- 
imum time allowed on the course is 
seven minutes. Contestants are 
penalized one point for every second 
over seven minutes. 

The North Park team garnered 650 
points to top six other teams including 
two PACE (RTA) teams. Rafferty's 
teammates were repairer Jose Guer- 
rero, and clerk Frank Fischer. 

The 69th street maintenance garage 
placed second with 632 points. The 
team included Taylor Kent and Roy 
Darner, both repairers, and Phillip 
Wells, clerk. Taking third place with 
626 points was Kedzie maintenance 
garage. Team members were repairers 
Phillip Murnane and John Mur- 
phy, and clerk Tom Smith. 

Servicer Robert Kaese and 
repairers Salvatore Furlin and John 
Kochopolus comprised the fourth 
place Forest Glen team with 615 
points. In fifth place was Limits with 
591 points. Team members were ser- 
vicer Dan Alvarado, repairer Tom 
Lyons and foreman John Musial. 

While bus and maintenance roadeo 
contestants drove the same course, 
they were not in competition with each 
other. Maintenance Roadeo con- 
testants also substituted a stop at the 
wash rack for the passenger stop made 
by Bus Roadeo contestants. 

The Maintenance Roadeo competi- 
tion included a safety mechanical quiz 
which required each team to take a 
written test, and a trouble-shooting 
phase in which problems with a vehi- 
cle had to be resolved in an allotted 
time. The top three scorers were 
selected as the top three teams. 




Betty Richman, quality 
control technician. Rail, 
checks the battery in this bus 
which was entered in the 
Fleet Maintenance competi- 
tion of the Maintenance 
Roadeo. Inspectors were 
concerned with items relat- 
ing to the operation, safety 
and appearance of buses. 



Meanwhile, maintenance crews on 
all shifts at North Park garage were 
treated to a catered lunch and mer- 
chandise gifts as winners of the first 
Fleet Maintenance competition which 
was conducted concurrently with the 
Maintenance Roadeo. 

In this contest, the larger garages 



entered two pre-selected buses for in- 
spection while the small garages each 
entered one bus. Inspection criteria 
consisted of 50 items relating to the 
operation, safety and appearance of 
the bus. Each item had a point value 
of two for a total of 100 possible 
points. eta 



Top performers 
named in contests 



CTA's top bus operators were 
selected for the 1985 Winning Circle 
20 following the June 2 and June 9 
garage level driving competition of the 
annual Bus Roadeo. 

Other top operating and station per- 
sonnel from the Third Rail Round-Up 
terminal level competition, and the 
Ticket Agent TieLIp section level com- 
petition have also been selected. 

Qualified trainmen participated in 
the terminal level competition at their 
respective home terminals April 28 
through May 5. This competition re- 
quired a practical demonstration of 
preparing a train for service, and clear- 
ing various troubleshooting problems 



The top nine motormen and top nine 
conductors systemwide were advanc- 
ed to the Roundhouse 18 final com- 
petition. 

The Ticket Agent TieLIp section 
level competition determined the top 
10 ticket agents or "Free Wheeling" 10 
in the system, following written and 
performance tests on standard 
operating procedures, rules and 
regulations, job duties, and respon- 
sibilities. The contest was held April 13 
- May 12. 

Photos of successful contestants 
named to the Winning Circle 20. 
Roundhouse 18. and the Free Wheel- 
ing 10 appear on pages 10-14. ^ 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 




CTA TRANSIT NEW 




'985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




; ?5 Vol. 38 — No. 7 



13 



IFip©® 




Ricca James 

Howard 



MMHH 




Syed Alimuddin 

O'Hare 



Elizabeth Manson 

95th Street 





Antonio Narvaez 

O'Hare 



Toy Kay Whiteurst 

Kimball 




Juanita Woodson 

Ashland 




Bryant Alexander 

Ashland 




Linda Woods 

Howard 




Pacita Ang 

Howard 




Angel Chapparo 

Kimball 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



9^ Top /> 



ENGINEERING AND MAINTENANCE/ 



QUALITY 
.CIRCLE. 





▲ Kedzie Garage Quality Circle members gathered for 
a round of discussion look to assistant leader Lon- 
zo Lyles as he lists concerns of the group on an 



easel. Seated around the table are (from left) 
repairmen Edwin Harding, Salvatore Alleruz- 
zo, David Maynard, and Milford Shelton. 



Quality Circle is maintenance 

workers' brain 
stormi 



JJL he best job in the world becomes a 
burden when there is no communica- 
tion between management and labor, 
regardless of skill. 

Japanese industrialists long ago 
recognized the importance of involv- 
ing the worker in management deci- 
sions as a way to bridge the com- 
munication gap and satisfy the worker, 
and increase productivity which in turn 
satisfies management. 

This concept, the "Quality Circle," 
is being introduced at Kedzie garage 
and Skokie Shops' Engineering and 
Maintenance areas. Brainstorming 
sessions are scheduled at both work 
locations each week with 10 
employees, including a group leader, 
coming together to discuss areas of 
concern which have an impact on pro- 
ductivity. The issues are then 
presented to a management steering 
committee for resolution. 

The committee includes George 
Millonas, deputy executive director, 
Engineering and Maintenance, ex of- 
ficio; Florence A. Salus, project 
manager, Quality Circle, director. Per- 
sonnel Services, Engineering and 
Maintenance; Richard M. 
Schneider, manager, Equipment, 
Engineering and Maintenance, and 
Thomas L. Wolgemuth, manager, 
Facilities, Engineering and 
Maintenance. 

Steering committee alternates are 
Terrance McGuigan, director. Bus 
Maintenance, and Frank Venezia, 
director, Rail Maintenance. Burt Van 
Wetering, business representative, 




Skokie Shops' J 

Qualify Circle 

thrashes out a 

problem at its 

weekly meeting. 

Participating in 

the round-table 

discussion are 

(top left) 

Rosario 

DiMarco, 

Larry 

Vanderhorst, 

Lou Valle, Jim 

Donnelly, 

discussion leader 

Raymond Hagerty 

(back to camera), 

Michael Carduff, Alamar 

Justo, Hercules Auza, 

Ralph Steven, and Bob Guarino. 



IBEW Local 134, Elcosie Gresham, 

president, Amalgamated Transit 
Union Local 241 and Elwood 
Flowers, president ATU 308 are 
union representatives to the Steering 
Committee. 

Ms Salus said the pilot program 
underway at Kedzie and Skokie could 
serve as a logical vehicle for expediting 
solutions for better communications 
and increasing productivity. 



The one-hour weekly brainstorming 
sessions tackle a variety of problems 
ranging from receiving parts, tools and 
other supplies, to safety and com- 
munications between workers and 
management. 

If these pilot programs are suc- 
cessful. Engineering and Maintenance 
plans to expand Quality Circle to other 
areas towards the end of the year. 

eta 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 



15 



Bernard J. Ford 




and Mary J. Boski 



A 



retire 




retirement reception was held on 
the evening of June 28 in the Mer- 
chants and Manufacturers Club of the 
Merchandise Mart honoring the July 1 
retirements of Bernard J. Ford, CTA 
Executive Director, and Mary J. 
Boski, Office Manager, Executive 
Director's Office. 

Former CTA Chairman James J. 
McDonough was master of 
ceremonies for the event, which was 
attended by employees and represen- 
tatives from CTA, RTA, state and city 
government, and transit related in- 
dustries and associations. 

Ford began his career with CTA in 
1956. He joined the Regional 



Transportation Authority in October, 
1975, became its general manager in 
May, 1979, and, on June 2, 1982, 
was appointed CTA executive director 
by the CTA Board. Ford also serves as 
president of the American Public 
Transportation Association, and upon 
retirement became the president of 
Baker Engineering in Chicago. 

Mary Boski held various clerical, 
secretarial, and managerial positions 
throughout her 34-year CTA career 
and directed office operations for CTA 
Executive Directors George 
Krambles, Theodore Schuster, 
and Bernard Ford. Ms. Boski accom- 
panied Ford to Baker Engineering, 



where she serves as his executive 
secretary. 

Expressing appreciation to his co- 
workers, Mr. Ford said: "Twenty-eight 
and a half years sounds like a long 
time. When you live it, it's the blink of 
an eye. You have made my career. I 
thank you for it. You will always have 
my affection and that of my wife." 

Reflecting on her career, Mary 
Boski said: "Thirty-four years ago, my 
dad said CTA would take good care of 
me, although I only planned to stay a 
couple of years. I'm grateful for my 
family and all the friends I have here. 
Thank you very much." 

eta 



Retiring CTA Executive Director Bernard J. Ford and retiring Office Manager Mary J. Boski display two of their most 
unusual retirement gifts presented by the Facilities Engineering & Maintenance Department. Ford received an antique rapid 
transit fare register, and Boski received a lamp made from a third rail shoe. 



76 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Bill Taylor, 70 

Bus controller retires 




Bill Taylor (cutting cake). 70-year 
old bus controller in the Operations 
Division's Control Center, ended his 
41-year CTA career June 28 at a cof- 
fee and cake reception in his honor in 
the Control Center. 

Harry Reddrick, Deputy Ex- 
ecutive Director, joined Taylor's 
friends and co-workers in wishing him 
well. Taylor received a cash gift as a 
farewell present. 

He and his wife, Helen, live on the 
Southwest Side. They have a 
daughter, Mrs. Doris Buffington. 

Taylor also is a master tailor and has 
constructed men's and women's 
clothing for many CTA employees 
during his career. He said he was 
ready to put aside the needle and 
thread and just do some chores 
around home that need to be done. 

"On second thought," Taylor said, 
"pull the thread on my quitting being a 
tailor. 1 might do it for a while longer, 




Cancer society needs 
volunteer drivers, 
schedulers 

1 he 



transportation between home and the 
treatment facility for ambulatory 
cancer patients living in the volunteer's 
general neighborhood and who are 
undergoing radiation therapy and 
other forms of outpatient cancer treat- 
ment. 

The theme of the Volunteer 
Transportation program, "Neighbors 
Helping Neighbors," is indicative of 
the program's ultimate goal which is to 
operate on a neighborhood level. In 
other words, with Chicago divided in- 
to 77 geographically-defined 
neighborhoods, the Volunteer 
Transportation program seeks to 
recruit a minimum of 10 drivers and 
one scheduler in each neighborhood 
with volunteers serving patients living 
in their particular neighborhood. 

Volunteers are asked only to make 
themselves and their vehicles available 
one or two mornings or afternoons a 
week to drive a cancer patient living in 
the same general neighborhood from 
the patient's home to a treatment 
facility and back home. 

Non-drivers may also participate in 
the Volunteer Transportation program 
as a neighborhood scheduler. By us- 
ing the telephone and working from 
home, a scheduler may arrange 
transportation for a neighborhood 
cancer patient from a list of 
Neighborhood Volunteer drivers. 

Any CTA employees or family 
members interested in volunteering as 
a driver or a scheduler are asked to call 



he Chicago unit of the American 
Cancer Society (ACS) is recruiting 
drivers and schedulers for its 



Volunteer Transportation program. 

Drivers, using their own vehicles, 
provide door-to-door rount-trip 




Lowell Young 

Volunteer Transportation 

Program Associate 

Coordinator, 

at 

372-0471, 
ext. 210 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 



17 



RETIRE/MENTS 




Retiree-elect John (Jack) Bowland, 

60, is flanked by four coworkers at his 
May 31 retirement party. They are, 



from left, Amy Diansan, Van 
Gosrisirkul, Mila Austria, and 
Stacy Heal. Bowland retired June 1 
as supervisor of property management 
& reporting, Finance Division after 42 
years of service. He and his wife, 
Lavern, live in Villa Park, and they 
plan to do some traveling during his 
retirement. They have four children. 
Bowland's family joined him at his par- 
ty in the CTA Board Room where his 
coworkers and friends presented him 
with a cash gift. 




John D. Schwartz, special projects 
coordinator, displays the cash gift he 
received from co-workers at his retire- 
ment bash held at the Merchandise 
Mart M&M Club June 28. Schwartz 
retired effective July 1 after 43 years of 
CTA service. He began his career on 
August 31, 1942 in Shops and Equip- 
ment as an inside mail bag handler 
and booth clerk. During World War II, 
Schwartz served in the U.S. armed 




forces from March 2, 1943 to October 
1, 1945 when he rejoined Shops and 
Equipment as a booth clerk. Roger 
Wood, manager. Management Ser- 
vices, said of Schwartz, "His job in- 
volved a wide variety of tasks from 
chasing down deliveries to straighten- 
ing out invoices and handling 
telephone orders. It required a lot of 
leg work, but I could always depend 
on John to get the job done . He will be 
missed." 



A cash gift 



Munyer retires, 
to San Diego 



David Munyer, cashier in the 
Treasury Department for the past 
seven years, ended his 33-year CTA 
career June 1. Before joining 
Treasury, Munyer worked in the 
Claims Department. 

About 100 of his friends and 
coworkers attended a May 29 farewell 
party honoring Munyer in the CTA 
Board Room. He was joined by his 
wife, Karen, and their daughter, 
Christa. His friends had presented him 
with a cash gift and a wrist watch. The 
Munyers have left their home in Park 
Ridge for a newly built home in San 
Diego, CA. 







David Munyer 

receives his retire- 
ment papers from 
William Buetow, 

Director, Treasury. 



18 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




AS REPORTED BY EMPLOYEES OF 
THE CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 

Meet Your Reporter 

Okay, Datacenter 
Operations, now you 
know you have a reporter 
in your midst. So help me 
out! Surely you have 
something of interest to 
contribute to this column. 
I'll tell you a little about 
myself. I've been involved 
in church activities, I'm a 
Sunday School teacher for 
three-year-olds, secretary 
of the Social Ministry Com- 
mittee, an aide-de-camp 
for the Lutheran Camp- 
grounds, a delegate to Lutheran Family Services, reader 
coordinator, and member of the Tape Ministry Committee. 
Is it true that if you need anything done, ask a busy person? 
Well, come see me. 

Management Information Systems 

OUTGOER: Rene Vargas, Production Control, has 
transferred to the South Shops. All of us would like to wish 
him the very best of luck in his new position... Bruce 
Weeks, Quality Assurance, recently announced that his 
wife. Joan, was eating for two, again. The new addition is 
due in March, 1986. They have a son, Jared, 4 years 
old... Bill Ehrler, Quality Assurance, received a letter from 
Governor Thompson in response to Bill's letter to save the 
Chicago Theater. The Governor seemed to be in favor of 




Bill's request. I guess those letters from the public do get 
read and answered by our politicians. Bill Smith, I/O 
Control, spent a relaxing week at Lake Geneva where he 
has a cottage. He says he just relaxes and thinks of anything 
but numbers. (He manages the tape library so numbers is his 
game (Linda Williams. I/O Control, and Andy Riz- 
zuto. Hardware, are still not smoking. Keep up the good 
work!.. I would like to thank everyone for their 
thoughtfulness when my father. William E. Frangello Sr., 
passed away on June 25. Fortunately, I had flown down to 
New Orleans upon learning of his serious illness the 
weekend before he died. We had not seen each other in 
nine years... We are all very sorry that John (Jack) P. Mar- 
ron passed away on July 14 at the age of 52. Jack worked 
in Systems Development for eight years. He was an avid 
book reader and loved to take pictures with his disc camera. 
Our condolences to his family. 

Patricia Glines 




Attention 



Cocd_ 

Volleyballers! 



Persons interested in Volleyball 
1985-86 should contact D. 
Caston, Ext. 4257. Mart, or send 
a Hst of team members and cap- 
tains names to D. Caston, Mer- 
chandise Mart, Room 754. You 
must have a minimum of three 
(3) women and three (3) men per 
team. 



Washington Garage 



Happy 50th Birthday to Tom Lenoir and Superinten- 
dent Herbert Williams. ..Howard Means took a REAL 
vacation---one whole month, from South Carolina to Atlan- 



SERVICE ANNIVERSARIES 



25 Years 

Clevelen Brogdon, Bus Dist. A 

Joseph Buscemi. Track & Roadway 

James Fichter, Rail Instruction 

Robert Hargrave, Body D 

John Jarecki Jr., Bus Service 

William Knudsen, Forest Glen 

Charles Laskowski, Signal, Phone & Radio 

Joseph Lazzara, Archer 

Joe Mack, Forest Park 

Edward McCutcheon Jr., Kedzie 

Mickey Reeder, Archer 

Edward Rich, 77th Street 

Henry Schumer, Track & Roadway 

Ronald Sorenson, Douglas/Congress 

John Ward, Support Serv.. Bus 



30 Years 



Samuel Adams Jr., North Park 
Earlie Bryant, North Avenue 
Hillard Derengowski, North Park 
Martin Dzincioloski, Kedzie 
James Heidewald, Archer 
Russell Lipari, Data Proc & Off Adm. 
Vincent Patellaro, Gen'l Maintenance 
Willie Pickett, Budget & Adm. 



35 Years 



Frenchie Ellis, Tech Services 
Stuart Maginnis, Quality Control-Bus 
Francis Mullen, Workers Compensation 
Phillip O'Connor, North Park 
Michael O'Toole, Elec. Dist 
Daniel Perk. I : r . 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 



19 



« mzM mm 



ta, Georgia, to Washington, D.C., to Brooklyn, New York, 
and back to Chicago! Totnmie Davis vacationed for two 
weeks in Chattanooga, Tenn., while Jonas Barnett went 
to Little Rock, Arkansas, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and then Kan- 
sas City for a 35th class reunion. Jackson, Mississippi, and 
the State of Florida were Nathaniel Masley's vacation 
spas. Six glorious weeks visiting Mackinaw City, Canada, 
and Wisconsin were Eugene Brudney's vacation escape. 
Mrs. Frances Johnson and hubby celebrated their 13th 
wedding anniversary vacationing in New Orleans. The Alan 
Glickmans vacationed in Louisville, Kentucky, attending a 
National Convention for the Blind. Irvin Perry vacationed 
in Marion, Alabama, for three weeks. C. A. Jimenez went 
to San Diego and San Francisco, California, and Albequer- 
que, New Mexico. Willie Robertson took one week in 
Decala, Alabama. Booker Henry vacationed for two 
weeks in Cleveland, Ohio, and attended the West Point, 
Mississippi High School reunion. And last but not least, 
Superintendent James Payne did something REALLY dif- 
ferent and exciting for a one-week vacation--he stayed at 
home. Wow! Was anyone here during the past month?? 
Remember, folks, give me your news before the first of the 
month. That way we make sure it gets into Transit News. 

Ruth Smith 

Materials Management 

Russell Lipari, file 
clerk, is proud of his 
24-year-old son, Peter. 
Peter started taking piano 
lessons when he could 
barely reach the pedals. 
After outgrowing several 
piano teachers, he took 
lessons with Iris Zahara. 
She knew his potential and 
knew how to get the most 
out of him. Peter attended 
Oak Forest High School 
and was conductor of the 
student band. During the 

summers, he was piano accompanist for the Confraternity 
of Christian Doctrine-sponsored musical, "Annie Get Your 
Gun." 

He was recipient of Illinois state scholarships and the 
Pullman Scholarship. Peter got his Bachelor of Science in 




Music Education from the University of Illinois. He was ac- 
tive in their concert band, too. 

While working for his Master of Music degree at North- 
western University, he was assistant conductor of 
"Vanessa." It was at Northwestern where he met the famous 
composer, Giancarlo Menotti (a familiar work of his is 
"Amahl and the Night Visitor") , who asked Peter to be assis- 
tant conductor at the Spoletto Festival of Music in 
Charleston, South Carolina. This was Peter's chance to go 
to Spoletto, Italy, for their festival. His performance was 
"extraordinaire ." He has just finished his second season with 
the Spoletto. 

Home about a month, Peter received a telephone call 
from Alexandria, Italy. They were looking for a young 
American composer. Off to Italy again! 

When Peter's not working abroad, he conducts the 
Chicago Heights Youth Symphony, a branch of the 
Chicago Heights Symphony. In his spare time he plays in a 
dance band, "After Hours." 

We wish Symphony Conductor Peter D. Lipari success. 
We know he will reach the heights in the field of music. 

Russ also wants us to know that he and his wife, Rosalie, 
have three other children, and they can write a story about 
each of them. That's one proud family! 

We extend our condolences to the families of Rod 
Daugherty, superintendent, Procurement Engineers, 
whose wife, Beatrice, passed away; to Helena Ward, 
receptionist, whose son, David, died, and to Larry Mur- 
phy, Affirmative Action, whose mother, Ollie Murphy, died 
in Lakewood, Colorado. Also, to the family of John P. 
O'Connor, retired director of Passenger Controls and 
Graphics, who died suddenly. All of them wish to thank you 
for your kind expressions of sympathy. To help us at times 
like these-"Life is made of volumes three, the Past, the Pre- 
sent and the Yet To Be; the Past is gone and laid away, the 
Present we are living day by day; and last of all is volume 
three: No one knows--God holds the key." 

Operations 

Colette (Szczepanek) Jackson, former executive 
secretary, Transportation department, paid us a surprise 
visit donning her western fashions. It was good seeing her 
again. To refresh your memory, "Cookie" left CTA seven 
years ago. She is happily married to Dr. James R. Jackson. 
They live in Paris, Texas. Colette is kept busy babysiUing for 
their two granddaughters, Alicia and Angela; keeping 
house; caring for her garden which is filled with vegetables; 



Pensioners 

STANLEY BARNAS, Shopman I, 

Rail Shops, Emp. 6-13-60 
MARY J. BOSKI, Office Manager, 

Executive, Emp. 12-26-50 
EDWARD W. BURNITZ, Bus Operator, 

Forest dlen, Emp. 1-19-56 
EUGENE CORKER, Bus & Truck Mech. 

South Shops, Emp. 2-5-51 
TYRONZA HANCOCK, Janitor, 

North Park, Emp. 7-19-54 
ADAM L. KNERR, Track Foreman, 

West Shops, Emp. 6-29-60 



CONSTANTINE J. LAMBROS, Ticket Agent, 

Kimball, Emp. 3-25-63 
SALVATORE F. MUSCARELLO, Bus Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 6-13-60 
DALE PETERS, Box Puller. 

North Park, Emp. 8-24-48 
JOHN D. SCHWARTZ, Spec Proj. Coord., 

Management Services, Emp. 8-31-42 
ALBERT SILINS, Cond./Motorman, 

North Section, Emp. 2-15-51 
WILLIAM A. TAYLOR, Bus Controller, 

Control Center, Emp. 2-28-44 
RAPHAEL WILSON, Collector, 

77th Street, Emp. 2-4-54 



FRANK J. WISCHLER, Bus Operator, 

Forest Glen, Emp. 6-25-59 
EDWARD C. ZAMIAR, Bus Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 9-28-67 

Disability Retirements 

VICTOR E. COLLINS, Bus Operator. 

77th Street, Emp. 3-13-61 
LAWRENCE C. RILEY, Bus Operator. 

69th Street, Emp. 6-6-66 
DEVIRGE WATT, Bus Operator, 

Kedzie, Emp. 10-31-68 
PEARLIE M. WILLIAMS, Bus Operator, 

North Park, Emp. 4-24-75 



20 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




CTA finalists for Superior Public Service Awards displaying their certificates of recognition are (from left) Mario Ochoa. Affir- 
mative Action; Fiore Adelizzi, Real Estate; Walter Lemons Jr. and Simeon Daigle, Operations Division. Supervisors 
joining in the celebration are Larry Murphy, Affirmative Action; Merritt Kotin, Real Estate; and William Thompson and 
Joe Vodvarka, Operations. Mrs. Geri Tapling, superintendent, Employment and Placement, was coordinator for CTA's 
SPSA nominations. 



ran MDii mws 

and sharing the work raising cattle on their farm, which is 
approximately 20 miles from home. While Colette was in 
town, she heard from Audrey Petersen, former executive 
secretary, Operations. Audrey and her husband, Howard, 
are enjoying their retirement. Colette also heard from 
Charles Keiser, retired Operations Manager, and his wife, 
Myra. All of them send best regards to their CTA friends. 

Retirees 

Enjoying dinner at a nearby restaurant recently were Al 
Lathouwers, retired supervisor. Payroll; Jim Touhy, 
retired contract clerk, Accounts Payable, and the newest 
retiree, Bob LaVoie, schedule maker. A! is busy working at 
golf tournaments; Bob enjoys traveling, and Jim is busier 
than ever. The three of them look great and say hello to 
their friends. 

Quality Assurance 

Ron Glaser Jr., the son 
of Ron Glaser Sr., 

superintendent, Quality 
Assurance, was awarded 
the 1985 AAU (Amateur 
Athletic Union) Teenage 
Mr. Illinois title for body 
building on Saturday, June 
1, 1985, in competition 
held in Wheaton, Illinois. 
He took first place in the 
19-year-old class, as well 
as being the overall contest 
winner. He received 
trophies for both cate- 
gories. Ron resides in Arlington Heights with his parents. He 
is a 1983 graduate of Prospect High School and this fall will 
enter his junior year at Illinois State University, where he has 
been on the Dean's List and is a member of Sigma Phi Ep- 
silon fraternity. Arlene Zittman 




North Section 

When the luxury cruise ship, S.S. Dolphin, sailed out of 
Miami Harbor, en route for the Bahamas, Sterling Battle, 
janitor, North Section, was aboard. Among their stops was 
Cove Island, Jamaica, and the aptly-named Paradise 
Island, where gambling is legal. The food was delicious, the 
nights were balmy, and although Sterling lost a "Crazy 
Legs" contest, he had a marvelous time ...Dr. Juan A. 
Asensio, son of Jose A. 
Asensio, rail maintenance 
at Madison/Wabash, has 
completed six and a half 
years of surgical residency 
at the Medical College of 
Ohio in Toledo. Juan, 32, 
a former summer 
employee for several 
years, will now begin 
special training as a 
Trauma Surgery and 
Critical Care Fellow at the 
University of Texas Health 
Science Center at Dallas/ 
Parkland Hospital. He will also join the faculty as an instruc- 
tor of surgery. He is a 1975 graduate of the University of Il- 
linois, and received the doctor of medicine degree in 1979 
from Chicago's Rush Medical College. Dr. Asensio received 
his surgical training at Northwestern University and the 
Medical College of Ohio where he was also clinical instructor 
of surgery and chief resident. 

Jo Anderson 

North Park 

Well, why not start off with our current students in train- 
ing, namely E. Ethiopia, H. Ethiopia (brothers!), D. 
Blue, R. Azeez, P. Alexander, A. Campbell, D. Per- 




1985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 



21 



rag mm m/§ 

son, W. Buckley, D. Clark, D. Cardenas, J. Pegues, 
K. Marshall, T. Herring, and oh yes, M. Alfred, A. 
Polk, M. Collins and T. Morrow, who were this reporter's 
students. Hmmm, by now they should be on the street hav- 
ing the time of their lives as they pull up to that sea of smiling 
faces at the bus stop. Have a SAFE summer, 
people... Former North Park operator Burt Schwartz, now 
at Archer, says he's never been happier and now works the 
extra board... Supervisor Willie Prince, B District, attend- 
ed the Hoinke Classic Bowling Tournament recently in Cin- 
cinatti, Ohio... Don't want to see her leave, but operator 
Madalline Martin says why not? After 6V2 years, she's in- 
terested in new fields... Pioneers like Daniel Boone and the 
settlers of the old West were hardy souls as they sometimes 
lived outdoors and cooked over their campfires. This 
reporter tried that lifestyle recently on vacation in Wisconsin, 
and admits outdoor living is different. But bringing along 
that electric blanket, portable tv, radio and golf clubs helps 
immensely... Getting closer to fame? Operator Leonard 
(Sheridan Road) Lloyd, with 14 other hopefuls, audition- 
ed at the Drake Hotel in a "Prince" Lookalike contest which 
in turn is part of a nationwide search being conducted by the 
Ron Smith Lookalike Agency of Los Angeles, California. 
Contestants in Chicago were featured on Channels 2 and 5, 
and were also given a segment on Channel 2's Bob Sirott 
Show. Finalists received one-year contracts and/or guest 
shots on a syndicated TV program. And yes, ladies, they're 
looking for "Madonna" lookalikes when they return to 
Chicago... Speaking of lookalikes, operator Vicki Nesbit 
visited THAT male dancer hotspot, the Sugar Shack, and 
came back with photos. Now the question is, why was 
everyone who saw the photos smiling?.. Instructor Willie 
McFall was probaly all smiles as he awaited the first of 12 
vaccinations required for his army reserve training in 
beautiful Cairo, Egypt, this year. 1st Sergeant McFall men- 
tions that volunteers able to qualify are more than welcome. 
So. . .Operator Angelo Rosario was last seen busily figuring 
out his retirement income when picking up his pension plan 
statement after realizing he's just reached his 12th year an- 
niversary... Hope you all attended the Bus Roadeo and gave 
a whistle and a cheer for our friends at North Park who 
qualified. Congratulations to the winners... Sure would be 
nice if a driver handed one of the box pullers a cold pop 
while he's emptying the farebox, wouldn't it? Of course, if 
you've never worked the vaults during the summer heat, 
you probably haven't had such a thought as this... or have 
you?. .A birthday greeting to box puller Louis 
Ferando...Well, it's time to say goodbye to three really nice 
people who this scribe and many other people have had the 



good fortune to know. Our credit union president, Dale 
Peters, is retiring with 37 years of service. Dale and his wife 
are heading for Nashville, Arkansas, and plan on being busy 
doing a little farming. Salvator "Sam" Muscarello, who 
with Dale has been out there working as a box puller in rain 
or shine, winter and summer, and always had a kind word 
for all of us, even if he was breaking in a new box puller 
truly) who couldn't get the hang of things. Sam somehow 
found himself a home here at North Park and says all of his 
25 years of service have been at this location. Boca Raton, 
Florida, is where you can address correspondence for Sam 
and the Mrs. And surely there's going to be one good card 
player missing from his usual seat when everyone else pulls 
up a chair. Tyronza "California" Hancock, our always- 
friendly janitor, will be completing 31 years and says he 
plans on remaining in Chicago. "California," as he is known 
among us, originally started at Archer garage and worked 
there for 21 years. For those of us who are curious about 
nicknames, Mr. Hancock's came about from his originally 
working the South California bus route. We wish these 
gentlemen a long and happy retirement in good health! 

Mike Flores 
Internal Audit 

Chairman 
Michael Car- 
dilli happily ac- 
cepted a baseball 
team shirt from 
James Fiorito, 
captain of the 
Capital Develop- 
ment baseball 
(left) and 
member 
Kur- 
(center), 
him 
team 




team 
team 
John 
tovich 

making 
honorary 

captain. Al Petska (not shown) is the team's third 
baseman. When asked how the team did for the season, 
Jim said, "The season is short, the games are long, and next 
season holds promise." Good luck to a real winning team, 
guys!.. Congratulations to Carol Musto on her move to 
Operations. She deserves only the best... Happy birthday 
wishes went to Kenneth Ford of Internal Audit on July 15. 
This department enjoyed cake his sister Natalie baked for 
the occasion... Welcome to Jerry Mroz who just joined the 
Internal Audit staff. Jerry is just what the state auditor 
ordered... Best wishes to Marv Miretzky on his promotion. 



NORMAN M. CLARK, 84, Kimball, 

Emp. 5-9-18, Died 5-13-85 
JOHN G. CORDA, 92, West Sect , 

Emp. 1-27-11, Died 5-3-85 
JOHN CORRIGAN, 88, South Shops, 

Emp. 5-5-42, Died 5-15-85 
THEODORE T. COWGILL, 82, Schedules, 

Emp. 4-15-29, Died 4-11-85 
EMIL O. CZECH, 85, West Sect , 

Emp. 4-30-18, Died 5-25-85 
JAMES J. DRAKE, 83, Beverly, 

Emp. 9-8-25, Died 5-10-85 



insr nvEEHvEORi^uvE 



RAYMOND F. EBEL. 81, North Avenue 

Emp. 5-12-43, Died 5-1-85 
FRANK J. FRIEDL Jr., 73, Stores, 

Emp. 5-1-41, Died 5-5-85 
HARRY R. GENNETT, 74, Archer, 

Emp. 10-24-33, Died 5-7-85 
EDWARD T. HAVLICEK, 83, Engineering, 

Emp. 9-19-42, Died 5-9-85 
FRANK J. HIGGINS, 84, West Sect., 

Emp. 12-13-40, Died 5-8-85 



SALVATORE SCIABICA, 84. Transportation, 

Emp. 6-9-36. Died 5-14-85 
ALBERT SIEGEL. 78, North Park. 

Emp. 8-8-42, Died 5-4-85 
ARTHUR A. SIM, 74, South Dist., 

Emp. 4-10-42, Died 5-16-85 
HAZE P. TROUTMAN, 81, West Sect , 

Emp. 3-19-04. Died 5-5-85 
EDWARD F. VON SPRECKEN, 83, North Sect. 

Emp. 4-9-23, Died 4-20-85 
GEORGE E. WAGNER, 74, Electrical, 

Emp. 5-16-29, Died 5-9-85 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




t- 






\ 








Officers of the CTA Senior Retirement Organization, Inc. met at the Venice Banquet Hall recently to discuss plans for the an- 
nual picnic set for August 31 in North Riverside Grove 2. Harold Burda, assistant secretary and editor, said CTA employees 
are cordially invited to attend the annual picnic where several prizes are being offered. Officers for 1985-86 are (from left) 
Jack Kalka, secretary; William Klecka, assistant treasurer; Pete Doudal, treasurer; Andy Kohlstedt, second vice presi- 
dent; Harold Burda, and Clarence Lind, president. Not present was Charles Wesley, first vice president. Any CTA 
retiree interested in joining the CTA Senior Retirement Organization should contact Jack Kalke at 484-6610. A $10 fee buys 
a life time membership. The organization is chartered by the State of Illinois and the National Council of Senior Citizens in 
Washington. It is also affiliated with the Greater Chicago Council of Senior Citizens. 



rag wmm mw§ 

We will all miss him...R. Andrzejewski of this department 
has been ill, but is now on the health come-back trail. Take it 
easy and hurry back... Chuck Karneffel went to San Fran- 
cisco on an Internal Audit Revenue Seminar sponsored by 
the American Public Transit Association (APTA). Chuck 
came back with new thoughts and ideas. Keep up the good 
work, Chuck. Joyce Petrich 

Control Center 

Laura Jean Rowbot- 
tom, daughter of CTA 
retiree Harold Rowbot- 

tom, former transit project 
representative, received 
the bachelor of journalism 
degree from the University 
of Missouri School of Jour- 
nalism. NBC White House 
Correspondent Sam 
Donaldson, the bac- 
calaureate speaker, pauses 
with the happy graduate 
...Education is a family af- 
fair in the Ronald and 
Tessa Gaines household. Gaines, a policeman, has just 
earned a master of science degree in criminal justice and 
corrections from Chicago State University. He returns to the 
classroom this fall to begin doctoral studies in public policy 
and analysis at Circle Campuus. Gaines' wife, Tessa, a CTA 
bus controller, is also a graduate student of CSU where she 




seeks an M.A. degree in 
business administration 
...Joan Cleary graduated 
from DePaul University. 
She will enter law school 
this September. Joan is the 
daughter of retiree Peter 
Cleary, formerly of Archer 
Repair. ..Congratulations 
to Ivan Travez Droira 
who graduated from Joliet 
Catholic High School 
where he's been an honor 
roll student since his 
freshman year. He is a 
recipient of the Interna- 
tional Foreign Language 
Award, listed in the Na- 
tional Honor Society, and 
was in Who's Who Among 
American High School 
Students. Ivan enjoys in- 
tramurals and drawing. He 
plans to study electrical 
engineering next year at 
Northwestern University. 
Ivan is the nephew of 
Marcelo Droira, Forest 
Glen. 

Carol Musto 




Joan Cleary 




Ivan Travez Droira 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 7 



23 



Sales coordinator's son 
pitches in Wrigley Field 



American Legion MVP pitcher Steve 
Culkar (left), Chicago Cubs general 
manager Dallas Green, and American 
Legion representative Leroy Leister were 
among guests at the Baseball Oldtimers 
Banquet where Culkar received the Heck- 
inger Youth Award. 





N. 



I ow that he's already had a taste of 
what it's like to hurl the sphere in the 
ole ball yard at Addison and Clark, 
could it be that 19-year old Steve 



^ Harper College pitcher Steve 
Culkar at Wrigley Field. 



Culkar, son of CTA sales coordinator 
Thorn Culkar, is dreaming about a 
place on the Cubs' roster one day? 
Culkar who just finished his 



- sophmore year at Harper College, was 
one of three Harper baseball stars 
representing the North Squad of the 
1985 National Junior College Athletic 
Association (NJCAA) Region Four 
All-Star doubleheader at Wrigley Field 
on May 15. 

The two seven-inning games 
showcased the finest junior college 
sophmores in the northern half of Il- 
linois, and attracted scores of college 
and pro scouts, including represen- 
tatives from all 26 major league clubs. 

The six-foot, 175 pound Culkar 
whose pitching earned him the 
American Legion's Most Valuable 
Player Award last year, started game 
two for the North, allowed just one hit 
in two innings, and struck out three 
batters with pitches clocked in the up- 
per 80s. 

In August, the broadcast journalism 
major begins his junior year at the 
University of Kentucky in Lexington 
which has offered him a full two-year 
scholarship. 

"I've waited for this day since I was 
eight years old. All of the extra effort 
put forth as I was growing up has paid 
off," he said. ^X!ia 



Pass for a hero 

CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 

(left) expresses his appreciation to 
32-year old Steven Edwards of 

Chicago, who went to the rescue of a 
woman passenger on a northbound 
Ashland avenue bus on May 15 after 
she was attacked by a man who 
robbed her of a gold chain. Edwards 
chased the man, retrieved the chain, 
and held the attacker until police ar- 
rived. A free monthly riding pass was 
presented to Edwards for coming to 
the woman's aid. "We sincerely ap- 
preciate your getting involved as you 
did," the Chairman told Edwards. 


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DOCUMENTS LIBRARIAN TN 
Govt. Publications Department 
Northwestern University Library- 
Evans ton, IL 60201 






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ifl Transit News 

Vol.38, No. 9, 1985/ For Chicago Transit Authority Employees and Retirees 
txLOU^o Ire*. ^S. c kr 




W/e have had 1,500,000 
customers in one year's time, so I think 
it's catching on. It's an economical and 
valuable service, and I think it will 
eventually break habits of grabbing a 
cab to the airport. ..It's an ongoing 
promotional thing, and I think that 
today certainly helped.' 



-£Zs 



WTi 



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JL '« 



M. 



ayor 



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Lisa Gose. winner of CTA's 1st 
O'Hare Anniversary Contest, is 
congratulated by CTA Chairman 
Michael A. Cardilli. 










And the winner is.., 

Shortly after 10 a.m. Thursday, 
September 9, 1985 at CTA's O'Hare 
rapid transit terminal, Chicago Mayor 
Harold Washington struck an antique 
Chinese ceremonial gong to officially 
begin CTA's 1st O'Hare Anniversary 
Celebration and Awards Presentation. 
CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli and 
other dignitaries from CTA and the City 
of Chicago, contest co-sponsors, and 
representatives from the news media 
awaited the Mayor's announcement of 
the contest winner. 

"Today's celebration of CTA's rapid 
transit service to O'Hare International Air- 
port represents one year of successful 
operation since its start on September 3, 
1984," said Washington. "Almost 
1,500,000 people have enjoyed this 
convenient and economical way to 
travel, just 35 minutes from downtown 
Chicago under Dearborn street to O'Hare 
with trains running every few minutes 24 
hours a day. This significant milestone 
also ushers in a focus upon the growing 
and developing expansion of the airport, 
which is already the largest in the world , 
and which in three years will be serving 
almost 80 million people. 

"To celebrate this milestone, CTA, 
Northwest Orient Airlines, the Hong 
Kong Tourist Association, the Hong 
Kong Hilton, and Concorde Travel, Inc., 
have awarded a 10-day all-expenses- 
paid vacation to Hong Kong for two peo- 
ple to Ms. Lisa Gose, winner of CTA's 
1st O'Hare Anniversary Contest." 

As Chairman Cardilli held a sign bear- 
ing CTA's car card advertisement for the 
contest and the magic number 
— 1,488,361 riders— Ms. Gose, whose 
winning entry was only 36 rides less than 
the total, approached the podium. 

"I just want to thank everybody who 
was involved with this, the Mayor, and 
Mr. Cardilli," said Ms. Gose. "I am so 
pleased, I'm numb! I don't know what to 
say!" 

"We thank you for using our service," 
Cardilli said. 

"I do," responded Ms. Gose. "I used it 
this morning." 

Ms. Gose then received congratula- 
tions from Ted Albrecht, president of 




Contest winner Lisa Gose shares a moment of joy with contest sponsors (left to right) Joan B. 
Phillips, director of sales, Asia/Australia, Hilton International; Michael A. Cardilli, CTA Chairman; Tom 
Rockney, district sales manager, Northwest Orient Airlines; Jenny Holaday, incentive and conference 
coordinator, Hong Kong Tourist Association, and Ted Albrecht, president, Concorde Travel, Inc. 



Concorde Travel in Arlington Heights, 
which provided the travel arrangements; 
Thomas Rockney, district sales manager 
for Northwest Orient Airlines, which pro- 
vided the air travel; Jenny Holaday, in- 
centive and conference coordinator for 
the Hong Kong Tourist Association, 
which provided a ground tour package; 
and Joan B. Phillips, director of sales, 
Asia/ Australia, for Hilton International. 
Hotel accommodations were provided by 
the Hong Kong Hilton . Chairman Cardilli 
also presented a certificate for a free CTA 
Monthly Pass to each of 10 runners-up in 
the contest. 

After the excitement died down, Ms. 
Gose, a stenographer who lives in Rogers 
Park and works for the Chicago Police 
Department, said that she had never won 
anything in the many different contests 
she has entered over the years, and en- 
joys the culture of the Orient, although 
her only traveling has been a Caribbean 
cruise. 

"I have a Chinese family as neighbors, 
and the grandmother, who doesn't speak 
English nor I Chinese, and I have 
become good friends because of our 
gardening. I'm interested in Mandarin 
cooking and the grandmother shares her 
veggies with me," said Ms. Gose. 

"I was pleased to hear of Mayor 
Washington visiting the Orient recently, 
and I hope to be able to go to some of the 
places he visited in Hong Kong," she 
added. 



As for whom she will take as a travel- 
ing companion on her Far East journey, 
Ms. Gose said she hadn't given it much 
thought, ". ..but I'm sure 111 have plenty of 
volunteers." 

A look... 

behind the scenes 

CTA's 1st O'Hare Anniversary Con- 
test was promoted through car card 
advertising on CTA buses and trains, and 
through radio advertising, which began 
early in August. Contest rules were at- 
tached to the car cards, and were also 
available upon request at rapid transit 
ticket agent booths. Riders submitted 
postcards bearing their guesses for the 
number of riders boarding at O'Hare Ter- 
minal during the first year. 

The contest was developed by Terry 
Hocin , CTA Promotional Services direc- 
tor, and staff members Helene Greiman 
and Joyce Shaw. Graphics for the con- 
test advertising were designed by Alexan- 
dra Eiva, and station decorations for the 
celebration were designed by Alan Grady 
and Jack Sowchin, director, all of the 
Publications Section. Arrangements for 
the awards ceremony were coordinated 
with the Mayor's Office of Special Events 
by Robert Gaines, CTA Communica- 
tions director. Valuable production 
assistance and technical advice were pro- 
vided by the Sign Shop at South Shops, 
carpenters from West Shops, and Rail 
Vehicle Maintenance, Skokie Shop. 



Transit News is published for employees and retirees of CTA • Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Department, Bill Baxa, Manager • Direc- 
tor of Publications: Jack Sowchin; Editor: Rick Willis • Graphic Designers: A. V. Eiva and Alan Grady • Contributing Writers: Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 

• Typesetting and printing provided by the Management Services Department • Distributed free of charge to all active and retired CTA employees 

• Annual subscription price to others, $5 • CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Merchandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, IL 60654. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



"Outreach" 




CTA 's Community Affairs Department staff members rehearse for openings of nine CTA 
Rider Information Centers. Staff members (from left) are: Dennis Redmond and Tom 
Chiampas, community relations coordinators; Elda Leal, Community Affairs Department 
superintendent; Bertram Mims, community relations coordinator; Betty B. Edwards, Com- 
munity Affairs Department manager, and Juan Puente (seated) bi-lingual community rela- 
tions coordinator. Puente is providing information materials to prospective visitors to the 
nine centers. 



Rider Information 
Centers "reach out' 
to community 

Cta opened the first of nine 
system- wide CTA community 
information centers August 19 in the 
Brickyard Shopping Center, Diversey 
and Narragansett avenues, to provide 
transit information to its riders. 

"This system-wide information ef- 
fort is part of our Community Affairs 
Department's community outreach 
program," said CTA Chairman 
Michael A. Cardilli. "Each center will 
be staffed with a Community Affairs 
Department representative who will 
provide maps, literature, and have 
forms for riders to express their views 
about CTA bus and rapid transit ser- 
vice." 

Each of the nine centers will be 
open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on 
designated days. 

The Brickyard CTA information 
center will be located near the en- 
trance to the Jewel Food store and will 
be open on the third Monday of each 
month. 

Another CTA information center 
will be at the northeast comer of 63rd 



and Halsted streets in the Englewood 
community starting Tuesday, 
September 3, and thereafter will be 
open on the first Tuesday of each 
month. 

A CTA community information 
center will be opened in the Ford City 
Shopping Center, 76th street and 
Cicero avenue on Monday, 
September 9, and thereafter will be 
open on the first Monday of each 
month. 

Other CTA information centers wiU 
be located in the following rapid transit 
stations on the days designated: 95th 
Street terminal on the Lake -Dan Ryan 
route - the fourth Friday of each 
month; Ravenswood terminal at Kim- 
ball and Lawrence avenues - the se- 
cond Wednesday of each month; 
Englewood terminal at 63rd street and 
Ashland avenue - the second Thurs- 
day of each month; 35th Street station 
on the Howard-Englewood-Jackson 
Park route - the first Friday of each 
month; Jefferson Park station on the 
O'Hare-Congress-Douglas route - the 
third Wednesday of each month, and 
the Howard terminal of the Howard- 
Englewood-Jackson Park route - the 
second Friday of each month. 

A Loop CTA rider information 
center is being planned. 



From the Chairman 



1,488,361 and counting 

Congratulations to Lisa Gose, a 
CTA rider and winner of our 1st 
O'Hare Anniversary Contest, who 
will enjoy a 10-day all-expenses-paid 
trip to Hong Kong. And congratula- 
tions to all CTA employees who 
have worked to make O'Hare rapid 
transit a success. We also appreciate 
the cooperation of Northwest Orient 
Airlines, the Hong Kong Hilton, the 
Hong Kong Tourist Association, and 
Concorde Travel, Inc.. all of whom 
generously provided the services that 
made the contest prize a truly en- 
joyable vacation package. 

Our O'Hare rapid transit service 
has met severe and unwarranted 
criticism, because ridership to the air- 
port has not immediately met projec- 
tions based on social and economic 
conditions of 10 or 15 years ago. 
Yet the entire O'Hare line provides 
valuable commuting service for the 
residents of the northwest area who 
work downtown, and residents of the 
entire city who work at O'Hare. Dur- 
ing heavy periods of airline arrivals 
and departures, there is heavy rider- 
ship at the O'Hare Transit Terminal. 
Also, boarding ridership at the O'Hare 
Transit Terminal has increased 
more than 30 per cent since we 
began actively promoting the O'Hare 
service through two contests, a direct 
mail promotion, and magazine and 
radio advertising. We will continue to 
promote the O'Hare service, monthly 
passes and tokens, and other 
valuable services that benefit out 
riders, and we are studying methods 
of making O'Hare service and con- 
nections more prominent in our 
public information signage. 

However, no promotional activity 
can be successful without the active 
cooperation and support of all CTA 
operating employees, especially 
through their knowledge of their own 
routes and connecting services, and 
their willingness to communicate that 
knowledge to the public. By showing 
concern for the needs of the public, 
and by helping our riders travel easily 
throughout our system, you provide 
the best possible service for 
Chicagoans and visitors alike 



■L^jLX^ 




1985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 




Dean Herman Bryant of 
Kennedy-King College and 
Mrs. Dorothy Harmon, CTA 
salvage control clerk, examin 
one of six CTA scrapped bus 
engines recently donated to 
the college's automotive 
technology section and its 
career and skills program. 
Bryant heads that program 
and is a former CTA bus 
engine repairer. 






CTA donates 
scrap bus 
engines to 
automotive 
repair classes 



he CTA has sent a dozen scrap bus engines to college to help make students smarter. 
The 12 General Motors Detroit diesel six cylinder engines, were donated to 
automotive repair classes at Triton College, River Forest, and Kennedy-King College, 6800 
S. Wentworth av. Both schools had requested CTA to make a donation of scrap bus 
engines and each college received six. 

Dean Herman Bryant of Kennedy-King's Career & Skills Programs is familiar with these 
bus engines -- he was a CTA bus engine repairer for three years at Limits garage and for 
eight years at Beverly garage while he was attending night classes to earn his academic 
degrees in automotive technology. 

Bryant told Mrs. Dorothy Harmon, CTA salvage control clerk, Materials Management 
department, the six were not the first scrap CTA bus engines to be donated to Kennedy- 
King. 

"In 1969 the CTA donated five General Motors diesel engines to Kennedy-King,and in 
1970 1 became an instructor in the Automotive Technology program and my class and I 
were assigned the task of rebuilding those five engines. This was a great challenge for me 
and my students. 

"By the end of the 16th week of work we had all five engines running like new again. 
Several of those students in my first class now are CTA garage maintenance 
superintendents. 

"Over the years those five engines were repeatedly torn down and taken apart, 
reassembled, and put back into running condition. Finally, they just wore out. All of our 
students here are adults working in automotive maintenance who want to expand their 
knowledge in a hands-on program. They include some current CTA engine maintenance 
personnel," Bryant told Mrs. Harmon, who was at Kennedy-King to make an informal 
presentation of the engines. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



NORTHEASTERN 
HONORS 



Bernard J. Ford was on hand for his 
last official act as CTA Executive 
Director as he congratulated Elonzo 
Hill, manager, Operations Train- 
ing/Instruction (holding plaque), and 
Harry Reddrick, deputy executive 
director, Operations, on being 
honored by Northeastern University, 
Boston. Hill received his com- 
memorative plaque for having served 
as class president for a two-part 1985 
mass transit seminar which was held at 
the university in February and May. 
Reddrick was honored with a similar 
award as Northeastern University's 
transit manager of the year. 




New Superintendents 




Twenty-eight new bus and rail superintendents I and two rail controllers were 
graduated on July 17, making it the largest class of management and profes- 
sionals in the history of CTA to receive diplomas. The graduates were assigned to 
various superintendent and controller pools. The new management and profes- 
sional group included Walter Frye, Leaile Hinton, Tessa Gaines, Karen Wilson, 
Martha Turner, and Esther McKelker, assigned to agent service; Bruno Romej, 
John Wallace, Otto Houston, Howard Freeman, Donald Reck, Willie Smith. 
Sterling Martin, Willie Harrington, Arthur Allen, Joseph Gonzales, and Melvin 
Jackson, bus service; James Daugherty, Willie Wells, Efrain Villarreal, Robert 
Graham, Fountaine Winston, rail service; Sy Motin, Juan Gonzalez, and Victor 
Martin, bus personnel. Others were Joseph Jones, Bernard Perry, and Joseph 
Martin, rail personnel; Ernest Young and Phillip Auriemma, rail controllers. 



VA announces 
Reserve, Guard 
education benefits 

CTA part-time soldiers, sailors, and 
airmen may be eligible for GI Bill educa- 
tion benefits, according to a recent an- 
nouncement by the Veterans Administra- 
tion. 

Grady Horton , director of the Chicago 
VA Regional Office, said the Selected 
Reserve Educational Assistance Program 
now provides up to 36 months of 
assistance for full or part-time 
undergraduate coflege or non-degree 
college programs for military reservists 
and National Guard members. However, 
application must be made before June 
30, 1988. 

The new GI Bill was created by the 
Veterans' Educational Assistance Act of 
1984 which became effective in July 
1985. Members of the Reserve and Na- 
tional Guard who have received their in- 
itial active duty for training and com- 
pleted 180 days of Reserve service are 
eligible to participate in this program. 

Horton said the educational benefits 
must be used before the members leave 
the Reserve or National Guard and 
within 10 years from the date the in- 
dividual first becomes eligible. 

CTA employees who are active in the 
Reserve or National Guard should con- 
tact their unit commanders for further in- 
formation, or call the Chicago Regional 
Office at 663-5510. 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



Commendation Corner \ 




Lee Robinson (Archer 
garage) is appreciated by 
Gregory Benson, of Oak 
Lawn, who was a daily 
passenger on his No. 162 
Pulaski-Stevenson Express 
bus. "He takes great pride 
in his profession, and has 
provided not only the ex- 
pected on-time schedule, 
but also the additional 
courtesies of a smile, a 
welcome and a goodbye. It 
is these small things, in 
combination with a clean 
vehicle, which caused me 
to switch to CTA from a 
commuter railroad. Mr. 
Robinson also indicates 
major stops by name, 
which was commonplace 
when I was a child, but is 
sorely missing now. I sup- 
port his quest to provide 
excellent service to his 
family of passengers. " 



Martin Mogk (Forest Glen garage) was praised by Marcia 
Sadlier, who works on South Dearborn Street, for helping 
to thwart a theft on his No. 152 Addison bus. "A 
pickpocket attempted to steal an elderly passenger's wallet 
as both were exiting the back door of the bus. When I 
brought this to the driver's attention, he immediately 
reported the act over the radio and closed the exit door. 
When the thief pulled the emergency cord and exited, the 
driver quickly pursued him and was able to retrieve the 
wallet. It was reassuring to myself and the rest of the riders 
that a driver was willing to deal with the situation responsi- 
bly and courageously." 

Harold Thompson (69th Street garage) earned the 
respect of Mary Sparkman, of South Laflin Street, for his 
"courtesy, promptness and dependability" as operator of a 
No. 45 Ashland/Archer bus. "There is always a 'Good 
morning' with a smile, and he's never late unless there are 
circumstances beyond his control. Also, he doesn't thrive 
on petty mishaps to keep him from making his complete 
run. One morning, there was a loud noise. The name and 
number display had fallen down. The driver didn't panic, 
but we all expected to have to take another bus. He merely 
pulled the bus to the curb, put the sign back in position, 
and took us on our way." 

Robert Randle (South Section) was the conductor of a 
Loop-bound Lake/Dan Ryan train ridden by Suzanne 
Woll, of Oak Park. "At one of the stops east of Laramie, a 
young man grabbed my gold necklace as he exited the 
train. Since the necklace had a diamond pendant attached 
to it, I chased the would-be thief from the train. Due to the 
quick observation and action of the conductor, both the 
necklace and diamond were recovered, with no one in- 
jured. Unfortunately, the thief escaped. I sincerely ap- 
preciate the actions and concern of the conductor, and 
believe that without his intervention, the incident would 
not have had a happy ending." 









> 9p 


>4 


w 

alp j 

J> /'■ 



Melvin Dukes, (North 
Avenue garage) was com- 
plimented by Eleanor Cash, 
of Argyle Street, for his 
courtesy on a No. 53 
Pulaski bus. "This driver 
not only called out each 
upcoming stop, but told 
everyone, 'Bus is in mo- 
tion, kindly hold on to hand 
rails when standing.' For 
disembarking passengers 
he said, 'Please watch your 
step when alighting, and 
have a good evening.' 
Twice between Diversey 
and Lawrence, where I 
alighted, he also said, 'It's 
Saturday night, so please 
watch your purses and 
pockets. ' I use your lines 
to go to work, and also for 
shopping and other errands. 
I felt you should know about 
this exceptionally courteous 
and considerate driver." 



Rogers Dean (Kedzie garage) was congratulated by Paul 
Brown, of Oak Park, who is a regular rider on Dean's No. 
12 Roosevelt bus. "This bus is often crowded, and this 
driver always keeps people moving to the rear of the bus, 
often injecting a little humor to accomplish this task. Along 
the route, if people are standing in the door, he politely 
asks them to move when others are getting off, and then 
tells them when they can come back on. His driving skill 
is also noteworthy. Overall, his enthusiasm and skill allow 
him to perform his job in a superior way that is a true asset 
to the CTA." 

Melinda Manoni (West Section) won the approval of 
Geordie Conoly, of San Francisco, for her helpfulness as 
ticket agent at the O'Hare station . "She proved to be most 
courteous and helpful in giving me information about your 
trains, buses and transfers. Your transfers are a wonderful 
way of saving money. I am so glad Agent No. 1505 was 
kind enough to thoroughly explain their usage. In addi- 
tion, she supplied information concerning various 
museums and shopping areas, all of which I enjoyed very 
much. You are fortunate to have such a pleasant, well- 
informed employee. She helped make my stay in Chicago 
a pleasant and memorable one." 

Michael Maines (Forest Glen garage) was thanked by 
Bessie Sumien, of Balmoral Avenue, for his assistance as 
operator of a No. 90 Harlem bus. "I got off his bus at 
Foster and crossed the street to wait for a No. 69 bus going 
west. He saw me lose my footing on the curb across the 
street, and came running to help me get up. He then had 
to call the paramedics, who came immediately and 
assisted me till I was able to get home on my own. I did 
have to see a doctor, and he assured me that everything 
would be fine in a few days. Without the help of Michael 
Maines, I don't know what I would have done. Please let 
him know how much I appreciate all his help." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



I 



dav 



in 



}- r r (\ recognizes 



heroes 



I 



THANKS for 

a job well done 




Motorman Leroy Crenshaw of 
Howard terminal (left) joins 
fellow "Day in CTA" 
honorees, bus operators John 
Paczkowski of Archer garage, 
and Donald Burson of Kedzie 
in the Control Center where 
they viewed procedures used 
by controllers to assist bus 
operators and train crews. Ex- 
plaining operations is power 
controller John Hightower. 
Not present for the occasion 
was rail conductor Jorge 
Pinares of Howard terminal. 



Two bus operators and a motorman were recent honorees on "A Day in CTA" 
in recognition of their extraordinary performance of duty. 

An alert bus operator, Donald Burson of Kedzie garage, prevented what 
could have been a tragic incident aboard his Jackson street bus route when a 
rider with a gun, upset because of a service delay, approached Burson and a 
supervisor. 

Burson distracted the man long enough to seize and wrestle him to the floor, 
and disarm and hold him until police arrived. The operator's prompt response to 
the situation may have prevented injury to other passengers. 

Meanwhile, Operator John Paczkowski of Archer garage was commended on 
"A Day in CTA" for giving aid to the victims of an automobile collision at Archer 
and Long avenues. 

Upon impact one of the vehicles was engulfed in smoke, and Paczkowski 
feared that flames would ensue. He notified the Control Center and secured his 
bus; then rushed to the scene where he removed a small child and a woman 
from the wreckage. 

In a similar incident, motorman Leroy Crenshaw, and conductor Jorge 
Pinares were commended for the swift action they took when their North/South 
train on run 809 had to be evacuated due to a spontaneous flash fire which 
threatened the safety of the passengers. 

Riders aboard the ill fated train noted that the crew performed admirably, with 
precision and teamwork under trying conditions, and brought about an orderly 
and safe evacuation. 



I Honorees 




Bus operators (from left) 
Elizabeth Duren, Rosa Irizarry, 
Ernest Hennecke, and seniori- 
ty clerk Walter Lemons, "Day 
in CTA" honorees, are briefed 
on procedures in the control 
center at the Merchandise 
Mart by bus controller Sterling 
Martin (right). Ms. Duren is 
assigned to North Avenue 
garage while Ms. Irizarry and 
Hennecke are located at 
Forest Glen and Beverly 
garages respectively. Lemons, 
a former bus operator, is 
assigned to the general office 
in the Mart. The four were 
given special recognition for 
distinguished service in con- 
nection with their jobs and 
service to the community. 



Samuel Adams Jr., North Park 
Edward Alexander Jr.. 77th Street 
Arthur Alpert, Howard Kimball 
Rogello Atrazola. North Park 

Ernest Barnes, Beverly 
Searcy Bamett. North Park 
Sarah Beaty. west Section 
Lynette Bolton. North Park 
Alvin Bond, North Avenue 
Charles Bright, H"u. t nd Kimball 
Steve Brooks. 77th Street 
Cornell Brown, 77th Street 
Otis Brown, North Avenue 
Joe Bullock. Limits 
Earl Burress. 69th Street 
Janet Burton, North Park 
Jean Cage, North Park 
Noel Castro. North Park 
John Chrlstner Jr., Forest Glen 

Barbara Dandrldge, 77th Street 
Donald Davis. JeTferson Park 
Rogers Dean, Kedzie 
Herman Duffln, Forest Glen 
Kenneth Fabian, Forest Glen 
James Forte, Douglas Congress 
Steven Furlet, Limits 

Gonzalo Garcia, North Park 
Tommle Gamer, North Park 
Lynne Garner, Limits 
Phillip Gary Jr.. 69th Street 
David Gaston. North Park 
Jeffrey Gilbert, Howard Kimball 

Luvenia Hare, North Section 
Eleanor Hasbrouck, West Section 
Brian Haynes, 77th Street 
Roderick Hudson, North Avenue 
Margaret Hunt. Forest Glen 

Donald James, 77th Street 
Willie James. North Park 
Charles Johnson, 69th Street 
Cedric Johnson, Kedzie 
George Johnson, Limits 
George Jones, 7/th Street 
George Jones, North Avenue 

Antoine Khoury, North Park 
Roland King, Jefferson Park 

Fred Labern. North Avenue 
Anthony Lag, Limits 
Paul Lane, Jefferson Park 
Dorothy Leverson, North Section 
Hipollto Liqulgan, Forest Glen 
William Lowery. 77th Street 
Mellnda Manoni, West Section 
William Markowski, Forest Glen 
Jesse McAdory. Forest Park 
Larry McDanlel, North Avenue 
John McDonnell, Limits 
Joe McWane Jr., Kedzie 
Hector Medina, Archer 
Maurice Miller, Limits 
Marceau Mitchell. 77th Street 
Robert Moskovitz, North Park 
Faye Murry, Limits 

George Neal, North Park 
Anthony Nicholson, North Section 
Hazel Owens, Limits 

Reginald Pace, North Park 
John Paczkowski, Archer 
Christos Papachristou. Forest Glen 
Van Penn Jr., North Avenue 
Frederick Pepke, Limits 
Flenard Porter, 69th Street 
Donald Prultt, North Avenue 
James Przybylskl. North Park 

Billy Ragsdale. 77th Street 
William Ramos. North Park 
Rochester Redmon. West Section 
Thomas Rhone. 77th Street 
Annie Rice. Limits 
Valerie Robinson, North Avenue 
Arturo Rodriguez, Forest Glen 
David Rossie. Archer 
Freddie Rychlock, 69th Street 
Burt Schwartz, Archer 
Lillian Shelton, Forest Glen 
Harold Shorts, Howard Kimball 
Edgar Singleton Jr., 69th Street 
Eugene Sparks Jr.. Howard Kimball 
David Sperling. Howard Kimball 
Vytautas Stukelis, Archer 

Wendell Talbert, North Park 
William Thompson. Archer 
Jerome Towns, North Park 
Willie Turner. 69th Street 
Clarence Van Mlddlesworth. North Park 
Jesus Vazquez, North Avenue 
Jimmle Walker, North Avenue 
Ricky Wetherspoon, North Park 
Willie Williams. 69th Street 
Roseaner Williams, North Avenue 
Patricia Williams. Howard Kimball 
Jacquelyn Williamson, Kedzie 

Linda Yates. Howard Kimball 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



Bryant Alexander, Ticket 
Agent Tieilp champion 
since 1984, takes care of 
business to the satisfac- 
tion of judges in the com- 
petition as demonstrated 
here. Observing the action 
are agent instructors Betty 
Morris, (left) and 
Karen Eden. 




other 198ii 
place foray 
third placet 
Mat as (rig{ 



COMPETITION 

INNERS 




Roadeo winner William Edgerton stands along side the banner 
bearing his image and displayed on the historical bus. Edgerton is 
accompanied by David James, Archer garage, third place winner, 
and Roadeo chairman William Thompson (right). 



Mary Curry, the first female motorman to qualify as a member of the Roundhouse 
18, was also Harlem terminal champion. Ms. Curry displays the terminal champion- 
ship trophy presented to her by (from left) A lex Johnson, manager, Operations Per- 
sonnel; Harry Reddrick, deputy executive director, Operations; Elonzo Hill, 
manager, Training/Instruction, and Ulysee Coley, superintendent III, Harlem. 

CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




tampion William Edgerton, Limits garage (3rd, left) and 
tpetitors show otf their trophies. Maintaining second 
IryearisJoe Rodenski of Forest Glen (left). Moving up to 
wvid James. North Avenue, while 1984 champion Michael 
fished fourth. 



Accepting well deserved honors are award recipients of the Third Rail Roundup. First 
place honorees cradling trophies are (from left) conductor Dennis Broderick. 54th street 
terminal, and motorman Leon Hedgewood, Howard terminal. Placing second were motor- 
man Donald Seay, Howard terminal, and conductor James Doorey, O'Hare terminal. 




ird street motorman Leon Hedgewood, Third Rail Roundup winner, enjoys a 
conversation about his success with Harry Reddrick, deputy executive 
tor, Operations. Others enjoying the moment are (from left) Etonzo Hill, 
ger, Training/Instruction; Alex Wilson, superintendent, Howard terminal, 
t/ex Johnson, manager, Operations Personnel. 



James McClain. superintendent, 63rd and Ashland terminal, accepts 
the 1985 Ticket Agent TieUp Chairman's Cup from 1985 champion 
Bryant Alexander, who is also the defending 1984 champion Sharing 
the moment is Ms. Anita Curtis, deputy executive director, Human 
Resources, and Harry Reddrick, deputy executive director, Opera- 
tions. 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



9 





® 






Special Services | 






pedal 
ervices 



Disabled 

community honors 
CTA Special 
Service staff 

Some 250 people were on hand at 
Washington garage August 23 to put 
on a farewell party in honor of the 
CTA Special Service staff. 

Mrs. Marian Butler, a special service 
user, and a former peer counselor for 
the Muscular Dystrophy Society, said 
users of the service simply wanted to 
show Superintendent Isaac Beal and 
his staff their appreciation. 




Isaac Beal, superintendent, Special Services, enjoys the company of these Special Ser- 
vices users (from left) Don Neilson, Ms. Mattie Porche, and Ms. Dorothy Youll. 



The farewell party was an idea con- 
ceived by Kerry Moore, another 
special service user, as he and others 
enjoyed a Special Service Culture bus 
tour in July. 

Moore, a food service handler for 
the Rehabilitation Institute, said ap- 
proximately $600 was donated by 
users of the service to cover the cost of 
the catered party. 




Elcosie Gresham, president, Amalgamated Transit Union 241, shares a few thoughts with 
Ms. Chris Matthew. At Greshsam's left is Ms. Dorothy Tolbert, spokesperson for the 
Disabled Community. 



"They have done so much for us. 
We feel like we are losing our family 
with the Special Service facility about 
to close," said Mrs. Butler who has 
been a rider on the service since its in- 
ception four years ago. 

"This service has given us the op- 
portunity to be independent and to get 
around as necessary. We have not 
been hurried by CTA Special Service 
operators, and this has been a bless- 
ing," Mrs. Butler added. 



Mrs. Dorothy Tolbert, a spokesper- 
son for Handicapped Independent 
People, expressed her organization's 
sentiments to Superintendent Beal as 
she said, "We of the disabled com- 
munity would like to commend all of 
you for your services. 

"We are aware of your tireless ef- 
forts in taking care of all our needs, 
and we want you to know that your 
consideration has not gone 
unrecognized. 



"A thank you is not nearly enough, 
but we hope you understand this 
thank you comes from the bottom of 
our hearts. Our lives have been 
enriched during the time that we have 
known all of you. Many people don't 
have the opportunity to run across 
such dedicated and caring individuals. 

"Since we have been dealing with 
CTA Special Services, all of you have 
unexpectedly become a big part of our 
family. We of the disabled community 
sincerely hope that this union will have 
a chance to flourish into something 
bigger. 

"We thank you for being you." 
(Editor's note: A recent arbitration 
decision allows CTA to implement its 
plan to contract out special services to 
four private carriers. CTA will be able 
to provide twice as many trips for its 
four million dollar budget.) 




Ms. Marian Butler, and Kerry Moore, 
organizers of the festive occasion at 
Washington garage, were pleased with 
the support received from other Special 
Services users. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




«jyi r# Cl ean 





Bob Ryan recalls"Mr.Clean"role 



Robert "Mr. Clean" Ryan stands at the ready 
with mop in hand to declare war on dirt with 
"more cleaning power. " The CTA special project 
coordinator was the original model for Proctor 
and Gamble's "Mr. Clean" liquid detergent. 



Remember "Mr. Clean," 
the Proctor and Gamble 
detergent for the home with 
"more cleaning power" which 
had its beginning more than 
25 years ago? 

Would it surprise you to 
learn that the product model 
for the muscular sailor on the 
"Mr. Clean" container is CTA 
special project coordinator 
Robert Ryan? 

Ryan explains it this way: 
"After P&G developed this li- 
quid detergent and decided to 
call it 'Mr. Clean,' they hired 
an ad agency to promote the 
product. The agency was 
tasked with finding a model 
who would portray the image 
best suited to the new P&G 
product. 



"The agency called on my 
friend, commercial 
photographer Ralph Cowan, 
who in turn asked me to be 
the model. I wore a fitted tee 
shirt and white pants, and a 
rubber skull cap to provide 
that bald 'Mr. Clean' image. 
The earring in the left ear was 
for added effect." 

P&G saw the black and 
white photographs which 
Cowan took, and used them 
as models for the cartoon 
character which has appeared 
on the product label for the 
last 25 years. 

Other commercials in which 
Ryan has appeared include 
the popular Kellogg's 
Breakfast cereals 
and Kingsmen's Toiletries. 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



11 



Retiree John F. Humiston 
is railfan par excellence 




CTA retiree John F. Humiston of 
Olympia Fields has combined his 
fascination for railroad travel and his 
enthusiasm for photography into a 
fun-filled pastime. 

The former Skokie Shops vehicle 
maintenance unit supervisor retired in 
1978, and has since devoted himself 
to seeing as much of North America by 
train as possible and putting it on film 
to share with other rail enthusiasts. 
"Geography and trains go together," 
Humiston says. "They tell me a lot 
more about geography than National 
Geographic," he adds. 

A railfan par excellence, Humiston 
is a member of the 20th Century 
Railroad Club which recently awarded 



him a free weekend trip of his choice, 
by train of course, for having logged 
the most train miles in 1984. 

Last year, the 71-year old Humiston 
traveled 23,140 miles. His travels in- 
cluded 14,143 miles over AMTRAK 
roads, 6,560 miles over the Canadian 
Railroad, and 2,347 miscellaneous 
rail miles. 

He has yet to collect his 20th Cen- 
tury Railroad Club free ticket, and 
doesn't know when he will. There isn't 
much time left after his many excur- 
sions for club outings. Besides, he still 
needs time to get into his darkroom to 
develop film and make a few prints. 
Over the years he has collected a ton 
of photographs. 



Although Humiston's travels for 
1985 have been somewhat curtailed, 
he has still managed to log 8,543 miles 
this year including 130 miles on the 
San Diego trolley, one of his favorite 
trips. In all, since his retirement, John 
Humiston has traveled more than 
60,000 miles by rail taking in the sights 
of the United States and Canada, and 
he's enthusiastic about seeing more via 
his favorite mode of travel. 

Besides the 20th Century Railroad 
Club, Humiston belongs to the Central 
Electric Railfans Association, Railroad 
Club of Chicago, National Railway 
Historical Society, Railway and 
Locomotive Historical Society, and 
the Canadian Railway Historical 
Association. 



Salvatore Perce retires 

Salvatore Perce, 65, assistant AM superinten- 
dent at Kedzie garage, slices the cake for guests 
which included members of his family, Kedzie 
garage, and other Operations Division person- 
nel. All were gathered in Perce's honor on his 
retirement after 31 years of CTA service. He 
began his CTA career as a bus operator on 
August 30, 1954. Perce and his family will 
move from their Bellwood home to spend 
retirement in Wisconsin. 




12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



AS REPORTED BY EMPLOYEES OF THE CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 





mm 




*0. | i^k 



Jacob Dallal 



North Park 

Hmmm. maybe our 
clerk, Menashe Dallal, is 

smiling with that extra bit of 
fatherly pride because his 
son, Jacob, not only was 
the youngest student to 
graduate with the highest 
grades from his grammar 
school, but also managed 
to finish in second place in 
a recent Bible contest 
which in turn enabled him 
to travel to New York to 
take part in a National Bi- 
ble contest held in that city. 



Congratulations, all ... A welcome-back-to-work goes to 
operator Madeline Martin (Sheridan Road) after her 
three-month leave of absence ... Talk about confidence 
in one's abilities! Clerk Syed Jafer wants everyone to 
know how great a clerk he is and that being chairman of 
either CTA and/or RTA is his goal ... Operator Jeff 
Moore drove to Jackson. Miss., recently to attend a 
family reunion . With 237 relatives attending, we can only 
wonder who volunteered to wash the dishes ... It takes 
time, so we're being patient awaiting that first look at the 
1937 Oldsmobile Coupe that Marcello Alonzo is work- 
ing on. We've seen his touch applied to the '56 Chevy 
and a v-e-r-y sharp '56 Ford Fairlane that he's spent plen- 
ty of long hours tinkering with . It's been his hobby for the 
past 10 years ... Next time Robert Williams (Sheridan 
Road) is standing in line waiting for the paymaster to give 
him his check, take a closer look at those custom-made 
trousers he wears ... Seems like everyone attending our 
recent retirement party for Pensioner (janitor) 



time and plenty of liquid 
but why, oh why does the 



"California" had a good 
refreshments at River Park, 
park district close those 
restrooms so-o-o early?.. 
Victor San Martin's 
daughter, Maria, age 17. 
has been nominated for 
Honorary Award recogni- 
tion. She will have her 
biography published in the 
1985 volume of Who's 
Who Among American 
High School Students. 
Miss San Martin also will be 
eligible to apply for a 
scholarship in the amount 
of $1000. Congratula- Maria San Martin 

tions, Maria ... Well, well, here are the newest full-time 
operators you and I will be working with these next 20 or 
30 years! Welcome to Diane McPeek, Julio Perez, 




Daniel Ryan, Robert Pitts, Joseph Butera, Halip- 
son Rivera, Jose Paez, and Amador Crespo ... In- 
structor W. J. Purnell, S/Sgt., Army Reserve, is getting 
ready for his weekend warrior training at Fort McCoy, 
Wisconsin ... Congratulations to those North Park 
operators who participated in this year's CTA Roadeo: 
Robert Richardson, Garage Champion ; Melvin Little 
Jr.; Jose Moreno; Robert Thomas; Leonard Lloyd; 
Oscar M. Repellin; Jesse Chin; Nilda Colorado; 
Francisco Rios; Robert Devitt; Louis Ward, and 
Daniel A. Dzyacky. ONE of us will get that Roadeo 
Champion Title yet ... Mr. Baxter, Superintendent: the 
name says it all . If you've gone in to see the boss with any 
problem, more than likely when you came out of his of- 
fice, you probably breathed a sigh of relief. That would be 
typical for the majority of us here at North Park. But now 
Mr. Baxter is working at North Avenue garage, and in a 
sense. North Avenue's gain is North Park's loss. This 
gentleman is surely going to be missed by a lot of us, but 
not for too long, we hope. We'd like OUR boss back. 

Mike Flores 

Materials Management 

Irene Peterson, utility clerk, lost her brother, 
Thomas Gushes, who died suddenly. She wishes to 
take this opportunity to thank all of you for your kind ex- 
pressions of sympathy ... Russ Lipari, file clerk, gave 
his daughter, Jodeen, in Holy Matrimony to Terrance 
Melbourne. The couple was wed at St. Damien's 
Church in Oak Forest, with a reception held at Sharkos' 
West ... Matthew Rago, material expeditor. Skokie 
Shops, is back to work after breaking his heel. Good to 
have you back at your post. Matthew . . . James Quails, 
order control clerk, and his wife, Ernestene, celebrated 
their 19th wedding anniversary on August 29. James and 
Ernestene have two children, Raquel and James. Con- 
gratulations, and many, many more years of happiness 
together . . . Nancy Sholdice and her husband. Bill, at- 
tended their first (but the second) "Sholdice Reunion," 
held in Ottawa, Canada. There were 380 Sholdices at 
the affair. A dinner was held at the University of 
Carleton. Twenty people were from the Northwest Ter- 
ritory and San Diego, with the remainder from Canada. 
Nancy and Bill are looking forward to their next reunion 
in five years and in the meantime will continue to delve 
into their genealogy ... Jim Madden, supervisor, 
Disbursements and Records, Insurance, lost his mother, 
Mary Madden, whodied after a brief illness ... While 
having dinner at a Maywood restaurant, this reporter met 
Jack Wexelberg, retired director of Internal Auditing, 
and Hank Luebeck, director, Program Implementation , 
Capital Development, and their wives. Jack has been 
retired eight years now and needless to say, looks great. 
Jack send his regards to all ... Visiting the Chicagoland 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



13 




rag w®m mwi 



area recently was Dorothy Wilhelm, former 
Stenographic employee and the sister of retiree Wil 
Lembachner, Claim Department. Dorothy and her hus- 
band, Harry, are enjoying retirement in Arizona ... 
Retiree Ray Hynes died in Largo, Florida. Ray headed 
up the Office Services Department some years ago. Our 
condolences to his family and to the family of retired 
Supervisor of Accident Statistics Mary E. Clarke, whose 
brother, James M. Clarke, died after an extended 
illness ... It's goodby to our summertime employees. 
Thanks for a job well done ... Congratulations to Rick 
Willis and his wife, Dorothy, who celebrated their 25th 
wedding anniversary. Rick is editor of Transit News. 

Arlene Zittman 

Forest Glen 

June , July and August have been busy months for our 
co-workers at Forest Glen garage. To our sick and shut- 
ins: Delores Carter, Phyllis McCoy, Will Borhm, 
Adolph Marth, Mrs. Williams, the wife of our Forest 
Glen Union Steward, to Phil Perricone, and everyone 
who needs them, we send our prayers and wishes for 
speedy recoveries ... Welcome back. Marty Del Conte! 
Glad to see you are feeling better ... The Hugh Master- 
son family had a grand time in Scotland ... Joe 
Slaughter and his dance teacher won first place in a 
dance contest ... Lincoln Eaton went on pension. 
Remember, keep active, Eaton!.. Kevin Farrell, who 
retired in March , sends his best wishes to all ... Hats off to 
the Forest Glen participants in the "Striving for Ex- 
cellence" awards dinner ... Happy parenthood to : Belin- 
da Hayes, a boy, July 26, 1985, 5 pounds 16 ounces, 
named Britian David Hayes; Rosie Starks, a girl, 
July 12, 1985, 8 pounds 10 ounces, named Tabitha 
Michelle Starks; Terry Sims, a boy, June 10, 1985, 9 
pounds 14 ounces, named Micah W. Sims; Mr. and 
Mrs. Antonyo Ramos, a girl, August 22, 1985, 8 
pounds 14 ounces, named Yomarie Ramos, born at 
Columbus Hospital ... The most celebrated driver for 
June and July is Art Whitfield. His birthday was June 
8, his wife's birthday was July 19, his fifth wedding an- 
niversary was June 28, and his step-daughter, Gabriel 
Siedler, had a baby girl, Jaclyn, born July 12, 1985, 10 
pounds 9 ounces ... Attention Everyone! Be careful of 
the bank automatic teller machines. Neville Keller got 
his hand stuck trying to complete his withdrawal transac- 
tion. On top of all this, the machine kept delivering $100 
bills and no way could he get his hand unstuck. Better 
luck next time; smile!.. A thought for October: "When 
you get where you are going, where will you be?" — slow 



down . 



Wallacene Good 



Internal Audit 

Transit New Editor Rick Willis and his wife, Dorothy 
enjoyed a seven -day Carribean cruise aboard the Italian 
liner MS Carla "C" in commemoration of their silver wed- 
ding anniversary. The sunny vacation included a day- 
long visit to Caracas, Venezuela, and was highlighted 
when Mr. and Mrs. Willis repeated their vows in a 
ceremony conducted by the ship's chaplain... Our con- 
dolences are extended to Jerry McManamon, North 
Avenue switchboard operator, in the loss of his uncle. 



Edward Joseph Rowland, who retired in 1965 after 45 
years of service. Mr. Rowland started with the CSL in 
1920. He is survived by his widow Nora. 

Joyce Petrich 
Ravenswood scene is 

painted in water color 




New York artist David E. Dallison, 21, currently studying art in 
Toronto, Canada, shows his water color of the Ravenswood 
"L" route's Chicago avenue station. 

David E. Dallison, 21, of New York City, visited the 
Chicago area this summer and took one look at the 
Ravenswood "L" route's Chicago avenue station and just 
had to paint it — in a water color. 

"I chose the perspective looking north because of the 
sense of inherent power in the scene. Not just the 
awesome power of the electric current in the third rail, but 
the station's dormant power to attract masses of people 
quickly and to propel them quickly on trains to distant 
points," Dallison explained. 

The young artist currently is living in Peterborough, 
Ontario, Canada, and is attending the Ontario College of 
Art in nearby Toronto. 

Why did he choose to depict the station without trains 
or people? 

"As an artist 1 especially like the linear perspective of 
the platform, its lighting fixtures, railings, and tracks. It all 
blends into a dormant power — like an electrified genie 
— waiting to be used." 

More June Graduates 





DONNA LYNN DANSBY 

Chicago Vocational H.S. 

Charles L. Dansby 

98th Street Shop 
Retiree 



HARVELL HORTON Jr. 

Fenger H.S. 
William Hill 

77th Street 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Service anniversaries 



AUGUST 
35 Years 

Raymond Bieniasz, Equip. Engr. & Maint 
Michael Connolly, Fac Engr & Maint 
Chester Majerowlc, Mech. Maint 
Raymond Mlchalski, Mech Maint. 

30 Years 

Bart Davis, Forest Glen 
Christopher Gilbert Jr., Forest Glen 
David Hlnman, Bus Pers. -South 
Raymond Jones, Ashland Terminal 
Jesse Jumper, Claims 
Raymond Lugiai, Bus Service 
Curley Russell, 77th Street 
Semial Siggers, Racine 
John Smith, Claims 
Thomas Staunton, Track & Roadway 

25 Years 

Michael Akai, Central Counting 
David Allen, Rail System 
Willie Brewster, Kedzie 
Hubert Burketh, District D 
McRayfield Caldwell, Oper's Control 
Tarleton Curry Jr., South Shops 
Joseph Daquilante, Oper's Control 
William Echols, 77th Street 
Walter Gaedtke, Power & Way 
Raymond Jackson, North Avenue 
David Johnson, 77th Street 
Thomas Kman Jr., South Shops 
Henry Krob, South Shops 
William Miller, Bus Pers North 
John O'Brien, North Park 
John O'Connor, Gen'l Maint 
John Pendleton, Beverly 
George Salamunec, District B 
Eugene Sherrod Jr., Civil Engr 
Jimmie Smith, Forest Glen 
Robert Tate, 77th Street 
Horst Tletz, Forest Glen 
George Tubbs Jr., 69th Street 
Bruno Vandervelde, Beverly 




SEPTEMBER 



40 Years 

John Newman, 

South Shops 



35 Years 

Henry Dickerson, Terminal-North 
Charles Ferrante, Utility 
Steve Kudelka Jr., Esc Mtce 
Gary Olsen, South Shops 
Leon Poe, South Shops 
Royal Reed, 77th Street 

30 Years 

John Anderson, 69th Street 

Fred Bassett, Kedzie 

Dennis Dobbyn, Sig Phone & Radio 

Bert Hukill, North Avenue 

Albert Porter, Claims 

Rosemary Roberson, Bus Pers -South 

Eddie Smith, Kedzie 

Theautry Snyder, West Section 

Theodore Williams, Rail System 

25 Years 

Mi Bride Anderson, 69th Street 
James Davis, North Avenue 
Martin Delconte, Forest Glen 
Leon Gaddy, 69th Street 
John Gassaway, South Shops 
John Gordon, Howard/Kimball 
Robert Janz, Transp Services 
Robert Long, 69th Street 
Dominick Marley, Linden 
Lewis Martin, Steel Fabr, Shop 
Emile Ousley, Elec Testing 
Nathaniel Payne, Training Center 
Burgess Peterson, Forest Glen 
Felix Robinson, 77th Street 
William Sears, Support Services 
Carence Shannon Jr., 77th Street 
Draco Slaughter, 77th Street 
Wyvem Thompson, Beverly 
Alton Williams. Rail Pers -South 
Dennis Winnick, Mech Maint 



iixr js&ttHJLOTm^ivL 



AUGUST 



CHESTER J B1EGANOWSKI. 65. 77th Street 

Emp 11-20-45. Died 7-8-85 
ALOIS H BRANDSTETTER. 74. Maintenance. 

Emp 5-19-47. Died 7-2-85 
WILLARD R CLAY. 82. Limits. 

Emp 10-31-27. Died 6-21-85 
PASQUALE COLOS1MO. 86. South Shops. 

Emp 2-22 44. Died 6-22 85 
GLENN L COOLEY. 81. Shops & Equip . 

Emp 3-29-27. Died 7 28-85 
STEFANO D ANNA. 81. Stores. 

Emp 5-9-36. Died 7-24-85 
ANTHONY J DeVAUX. 77. South Shops, 

Emp 5-8 47. Died 7-19-85 
ROY H ENGWALL. 81. Beverly. 

Emp 4-22 29. Died 7 29-85 
JOHN ESPOSITO. 81. Shops & Equip . 

Emp 1-8 24. Died 7-22-85 
EDWARD P HE1DENREICH. 73. North Ave . 

Emp 3-12-34. Died 7-2 85 



WILLIAM P HOOPER, 62. Kedzie. 

Emp 2-15-51. Died 7-31-85 
BERNARD KLATT. 68. South Shops. 

Emp 11-10-47. Died 7-30-85 
JOHN KULLOWITCH. 85. South Shops. 

Emp 9-12-22. Died 7-29-85 
PATRICK McGING. 64. West Shops. 

Emp 7-31-50. Died 7-10-85 
PETER MIRKOVICH. 95, Way & Structs.. 

Emp 8-23-18. Died 6-26 85 
OSCAR F POHL. 65. Stores. 

Emp 11-19-49. Died 7- 16-85 
ESTEBAN ROSARIO, 60. Madison Wabash. 

Emp 4 21-72, Died 7-4-85 
JACOB A RUSNAK. 74. North Park. 

Emp 2-3-36. Died 7-3 85 
RUTH M SOUTTER, 91. Transportation. 

Emp 4-4-21 Died 7-17-85 
FRANK P SPOLEC. 83. South Shops. 

Emp 12-27 22. Died 7-26 85 
SAMUEL W WILSON. 71. Beverly. 

Emp 8-14-41. Died 7-2-85 
WALTER J ZURAWSKI. 67. 77th Street. 

Emp 6-5-46. Died 7 2-85 



SEPTEMBER 



WILLIAM J BARNES. SO. South Shops 

Emp 4 17 34. Died 7 20-85 
WILLIAM F BLUME. 75, North Avenue. 

Emp 8 10-48. Died 8 14-85 
LAMBERT BRONS. 80, South Shops. 

Emp 6 8-26. Died 8-7-85 
EDWARD J COMAN. 78. Claim. 

Emp 1 11 47. Died 8 28 85 
DOMENICO DISTASIO. 90. Way & Slrucls 

Emp 11 20 19 Died 8 7 85 
WILLIAM T HANNA 93, Soutli Shops 

Emp 5-31 16, Died 8 31 85 
JAMES P HARTIGAN 73. West Section 

Emp 11 13-45. Died 8 25 85 
JOHN B HAYES 68 Kedzie 

Emp 3-1-46 Died 8 8 8 - 
RUDOLF HEROL1) 83 Stores 

Emp 10 b 2b. Die J 8 10-85 
JOHN F HOGAN. 79. 77th Slreei. 

Emp 2 19 36 Died 7 31 85 



PENSIONERS 

August 

EARL BARLEY Sr . Training Clerk. 

Limits Tmg Cntr . Emp 1-20 58 
LOUIS F BERRY. Bus Operator, 

North Avenue, Emp 4-19-56 
JOSEPH D CARL YON. Bus & Truck Mech , 

South Shops. Emp 1-27-59 
JOHNNIE L HENDERSON. Term Foreman, 

Kimball Shop, Emp 1 7-46 
WILLIAM B. HILLER. Ticket Agent. 

West Section. Emp 9-23-63 
PETER L JANKE. Chief Elect Tester, 

West Shops. Emp 9-18-39 
NICHOLAS T LAMBRAKOS. Bus Servicer. 

Archer. Emp 5-14-59 
JAMES E MARBLE Jr . Sr Sched Clerk, 

Operations Planning. Emp 9-20-56 
SALVADOR P PERCE. Ass't Supt -Bus. 

Kedzie, Emp 8-30-54 

Disability Retirement 

MILTON HILL. Bus Operator. 
Archer. Emp 8-10-70 

September 

ARNOLD BELER. Bus Operator. 

North Park. Emp 8-14-67 
OTWA CLEMONS, Bus Operator. 

69th Street, Emp 2-16-56 
LINCOLN L EATON, Bus Operator. 

Forest Glen, Emp. 1-5-59 
STEVE ECONOM. Bus Servicer. 

Archer. Emp 5-14-59 
LOUIS E FORD. Bus Operator. 

North Avenue. Emp 1-7-48 
JOSEPH P IRWIN. Carpenter. 

South Shops, Emp 8-10-49 
JOSEPH R JAROS. Elect Worker, 

South Shops, Emp 11-23-59 
CHARLES H LUEPKE. Tel Operator. 

North Avenue, Emp 10-9 45 
DONALD MCCARTHY. Bus & Truck Mech . 

South Shops, Emp 12-7-48 
GEORGE J SALAMUNEC, Supervisor. 

District B. Emp 8-4-60 
WILL TAYLOR. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 3-19-53 

Disability Retirements 

THOMAS M BUTLER, Plumber. 

West Shops, Emp. 10-23-74 
MICHAEL T CAFFREY. Blacksmith Wldr . 

Skokie Shop. Emp. 2-4-70 
MARY S WILLIAMS. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 6-30-75 



RAYMOND A HYNES. 81 Ollice Services 

Emp 9-1-46. Died - 
THOMAS M KACZYNSKI 7-' Limits 

Emp 1.' 28 45 Died 8 1385 
MICHAEL M KASMAN 71 Fi .rest Glen 

Emp 2-26-47. Died 813-85 
STANLEY J KAZAK. 71 North Park. 

Emp 5-21 42 Di< : - 18-8 
WILLIAM L MAC1.IN ' 

Emp 12 28 S3 Died K 21 
MORRIS R MADISON 65 West 

Emp 10-5-76. Died - 
CHARLES C PETERSON S3 Electrical. 

Emp 4 22 24 Died S I 
WILLIAM D QUIGl.t i - 

Emp 2-2 
JOSEPH SCARNATO 92 I 

Emp b 8 43. Died 8-1 85 
AlK.llsl I SHIMKtls 74 Dislnst A. 

Emp I < ■ 

ARTHUR J. SMITI 

Emp ( 16 59 Died 8-11-8 

( ,| i IR( ,1 '.', • Archer. 

Emp 2-1 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



15 



SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT TO EMPLOYEES WITH 3 OR MORE MONTHS SERVICE 

The Authority is constantly searching for plans that can benefit you. 

After careful research we have completed arrangements to make available a state-of-the-art Universal Life In- 
surance Program to all employees with three (3) or more months service. This program will supplement any and all in- 
vestment plans you may now have as well as offer a guaranteed protection opportunity for you and you family. 

Some of the plans advantages for you are: 

1) IT IS COMPLETELY VOLUNTARY. 

2) YOU ENJOY THE CONVENIENCE, SAFETY & RELIABILITY OF PAYROLL DEDUCTION 

3) YOU CAN OBTAIN LIFE INSURANCE AT TRULY AFFORDABLE RATES. 

4) YOU CHOOSE WHATEVER COMBINATIONS OF INDIVIDUAL PLANS AND RIDERS THAT ARE 
BEST FOR YOU AND YOUR FAMILY. 

5) THE PROGRAM BUILDS CASH VALUES WHICH REFLECT CURRENT MARKET INTEREST RATES 
(BUT IN NO EVENT LESS THAN 5V2%). 

6) YOUR PROGRAM IS SECURE. IT CANNOT BE CANCELED AS LONG AS CASH VALUE REMAINS 
- EVEN IF YOU TEMPORARILY SUSPEND PREMIUM PAYMENTS. 

7) THE PLAN IS YOURS AND YOU CAN TAKE IT WITH YOU AT NO INCREASE IN COST IF YOU 
LEAVE CTA EMPLOYMENT. 

8) THE PROGRAM BECOMES EFFECTIVE FOR YOU ON THE DATE YOU SIGN THE APPLICATION 
AND PAYROLL APPLICATION FORM. 

Representatives for this program will be at our various locations in the near future. We sincerely urge you to avail 
yourself of their hospitality, get to know them and learn of the benefits available to you under the Universal Life In- 
surance plan. 

We are pleased to make this program available to you. For all who decide to take advantage of the unusual oppor- 
tunities it offers, we will make the necessary arrangements to put it into effect and continue to provide the necessary 
administrative back-up that will keep it in effect as long as you like what it does for you. 



Sincerely 




i^-JLXL; 



Che 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555, Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT NO. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



DOCUMENTS LIBRARIAN TN 
Govt. Publications Department 
Northwestern University Library 
Evanston, IL 60201 



^jUcLc+x^e) i^ZZ^-^t^'T^^nrtSn^ 



xa 



Transit News 



— 



SjAfc 



Vol.38, No. 10,1985, For Chicago Tiansit Authority Employees and Retirees 



for 







Striving for Excellence— 



m 




ore than 700 friends and guests 
joined in paying homage to 880 Striv- 
ing for Excellence honorees at the 
Condesa del Mar in south suburban 
Alsip on September 14. 

It was the second annual event 
specifically arranged to award and 
recognize CTA bus operators, ticket 
agents, conductors, motormen, and 
other operations personnel whose 
work records and productivity of the 
previous year were of impeccable 
quality. 

Included among the 1985 honorees 
were 311 employees of the Engineer- 
ing and Maintenance Division who 
were equally outstanding and were ac- 
corded the same recognition. 



•4 Condesa del Mar's marquee proclaims 
CTA's finest as the second annual 
Striving for Excellence banquet is held 
at the popular supper club. 



A perfect work record reflects no oc- 
casions of tardiness, no chargeable in- 
juries on duty, no complaints, viola- 
tions, suspensions, accidents, correc- 
tive case interviews, or absences. 

CTA Chairman Michael A. Car- 
dilli told the honorees, "It's rewarding 
to see this gathering recognized and 
appreciated for the many efforts which 
you put forth everyday and which may 
seem to be thankless and appear to go 
unnoticed. I wish we could shelter you 
from the unwarranted criticism so 
often hurled your way." 

Board member Nick Ruggiero 
who also spoke to the honorees, prais- 
ed them as "--the best in the transit in- 
dustry. We're so very proud of you." 

Continued from page 7 




Florence Salus (left), and Linda 

Grysbeck, vice chairperson, and 
chairperson respectively, reflect the 
mood of the evening at Condesa del 
Mar as they stand ready to greet 
guests. Mrs. Salus is director. 
Engineering and Maintenance, Per- 
sonnel Services and Ms. Grysbeck is 
superintendent, Training Pro- 
grams/Procedures Development. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



)TA's best at testimonial dinner 



A toast to the honorees is led by 
Chief Administrative Officer Larry 
Pianto (center). Holding glasses high 
in recognition of Striving for Ex- 
cellence honorees are (from left) 
Richard Schneider, manager. 
Equipment Engineering and 
Maintenance; Elonzo Hill, manager. 
Operations Training Instruction; CTA 
Board Member Nick Ruggiero; Pian- 
to; Deputy Executive Directors. 
George Millonas, Equipment 
Engineering and Maintenance: Anita 
Curtis, Human Resources: Linda 
Grysbeck, superintendent. Training 
Programs/Procedures Development, 
and Deputy Executive Director Harry 
Reddrick, Operations. 



fa 



<TT' »"» V • ' ■ 






CTA Board Member Nick Ruggiero 

looks over the Striving for Excellence 
program along with Deputy Executive 
Director Harry Reddrick, Operations 
(left), and Elonzo Hill, manager. 
Operations Training/Instruction 
(right). 





Jamie Sandoval 




Leon Fields 



Dorcas Joslin 



A 
cross 

section 






m 



Philip 
Huggins 





Georgia 
Barnett 





Herbert Boyd, 17 years service- 
Central District supervisor--"Any job 
worth doing is worth doing well. I like 
to give myself plenty of time to do my 
job, and to think things through. It's a 
job I like very much." Boyd is a 
graduate of Control Data Institute and 
has an associate degree in electrical 
engineering. 

Georgia L. Barnett, 16 years 
service--money handler--"I have a job 
to do, and I do it according to the rules 
and regulations, which I find is the best 
way to avoid problems," the mother of 
two declared. 

Philip Huggins, 19 years service— 
towerman, Ashland termina!--A native 
New Yorker, Huggins said, "I'm 
always at work, and I do the best job 
possible when I'm working. It's really 
good to recognize the Striving for Ex- 
cellence honorees. It makes you feel 
good." 

Jamie Sandoval, 5 years service - 
bus operator, North Park--"I follow the 
rules and exercise good judgment. I 
also try to keep people on my side 
when I'm on the street and I try to pre- 
vent any abuse of the system concern- 
ing fares and service. Sandoval has an 
associate of arts degree in liberal arts. 



A Of 

honorees 



Herbert Boyd 



Rudolph Dillon 



Dorcas Joslin, 3 years service- 
repairer, 98th street terminal-"I have 
a job that gives me a sense of worth. It 
is challenging, has a lot of responsibili- 
ty and is one that I enjoy. It is a job that 
not a lot of women do ." Ms . Joslin is a 
1974 graduate of the University of 
Chicago and finished a four year ap- 
prenticeship at U.S. Steel. 

Leon Fields, 16 years service- 
foreman, 98th street terminal-"l put 
forth my best and then I don't worry 
about it. I try to deal with the people 
working for me the way I want others 
to deal with me, and that is I try to be 
fair, and stay with the rules. My people 
say that I'm fair. It's live and let live," 
said Fields who holds a bachelor of 
arts degree in business management 
from Chicago State University. 

Rudolph Dillon, 33 years service- 
rail supervisor, Kimball and 
Lawrence— "I believe in the team con- 
cept because the chain is no stronger 
than its weakest link. We try to accen- 
tuate the positive and eliminate the 
negative as we strive to give good ser- 
vice. Service is all we have to give the 
people. We try to keep a good outlook 
and do the best job that we can." 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Fermin Colon 



and 

their 

comments 



Fermin Colon, 11 years service-rail 
janitor foreman, Madison and 
Wabash--"I just try to be a good 
worker and do what has to be done. I 
like my job, and 1 work hard at it." 

Michael Carduff, 2 years service, 
electrical worker, South Shops-'The 
work is challenging and interesting, a 
little like a game. I enjoy what I do 
because I like the many different pro- 
blems which I encounter in this work. I 
do the very best job that I can," said 
the Navy veteran who has been an 
electrician for 13 years. 

John Perkins, 25 years service--bus 
instructor--"! have no problem with 
coming to work because I like what I 
do. It makes me feel good to see peo- 
ple I've trained move up in the 
Authority. The many employee incen- 
tive programs, are really good. Pro- 
grams such as Striving for Excellence, 
ESPP, Bus Roadeo, Ticket Agent 
TieUp and others have really boosted 
employee morale." 

S. L. Brooks, 28 years service-track 
maintenance--"I'm supporting a fami- 
ly, so I'm at work because it's a job that 
I have to do. When people depend on 
you it's important to be dependable. It 
means an awful lot because a man's 
word is about all he has. I try to make 
sure that I'm here to do my job." 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



Michael Carduff 





- 



John Perkins 




From the Chairman 

Giving 
the best 
in service 



Last month we celebrated the 
outstanding performances of 880 
remarkable CTA employees who we 
acclaimed the best in professional tran- 
sit personnel. 

These honored employees have 
dedicated their lives to striving for ex- 
cellence in performance, and ex- 
emplary service. Surely they are 
deserving of management's plaudits 
and the respect of their peers. Similar- 
ly, we doff our hats to those unsung 
heroes and heroines — the families of 
our dedicated employees; for without 
their support the stride for excellence 
may well have fallen short of the mark. 

Both Mayor Harold Washington 
and Governor James Thompson have 
accorded special recognition to CTA 
Striving for Excellence honorees as 
distinguished public servants. Mayor 
Washington and Governor Thompson 
have also heralded the CTA catagories 
of competition which stressed depen- 
dability, team work, employee and 
passenger safety, and an established 
record of outstanding achievement 
which has long been the CTA rule 
rather that the exception, and which 
has always had the unswerving sup- 
port of every CTA employee's family. 

There can be little doubt that the 
perseverance to strive for excellence is 
fostered by the personal improvement 
and job commitment which continues 
to reach new levels. The increased 
participation in job knowledge and 
skill development programs has 
strengthened our employees and 
created that level of achievement 
known only to those whose en- 
thusiasm is stimulated by a devotion to 
the best in service. 

Professionalism and dedication as 
demonstrated by the Striving for Ex- 
cellence honorees is put on the line 
every day and makes the difference in 
difficult times. I congratulate you and 
thank you for a job well done. 



-jCXt- 



S. L. Brooks 




Striving for Excellence- CTA's best 




... / 

* 








Althea Johnson, featured vocalist, 
kept the audience entertained with a 
variety of popular songs throughout 
the evening. Music was provided by 
the Grand Staff band. 







CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Striving for Exce 



I I W' 



Striving for 










Continued from page 2 

Chief Administrative Officer Larry 
Pianto said, "Each of you hold a 
special place in our hearts because you 
have made our lives easier through 
your dedication to service. You have 
maintained the fine tradition of 'people 
moving people' in a most professional 
manner." 

George Millonas, deputy ex- 
ecutive director. Engineering and 
Maintenance, also recognized the 
Striving for Excellence honoreesas the 
transit industry's best as he stated. 
"Our job is simple, we move people, 
and you do it better than anybody." 

Calling the honored CTA employ- 
ees the "true professionals." Harry 
Reddrick, deputy executive director. 
Operations, said, "You set the exam- 
ple that inspires your peers to improv- 
ed job performance. You keep CTA 
going in good times as well as in the 
not-so-good times, so be proud of 
your significant function and its impor- 
tance to the City of Chicago." 

Entertainment for the evening in- 
cluded music for dancing by the Grand 
Staff, bandleader and vocalist Mark 
Ingram, vocalist Althea Johnson, 
and the comedy team "Straight Up." 

eta 




98th terminal takes top 
honors in first rail 
maintenance roundup 



A three -member rail maintenance 
team representing 98th Street terminal 
took top honors in the first CTA rail 
maintenance roundup held August 25 
at Rosemont terminal. 

The winners were combination clerk 
Dorothy Ballard and repairers Lee 
Slay, and Dave Artis, team captain. 
As rewards for their success each 
member of the first place team was 
given the option of an all expenses 



paid weekend holiday, or a 19-inch 
color television. The first prize also in- 
cluded individual plaques as well as a 
traveling plaque for the 98th Street 
terminal, and theater and gift cer- 
tificates for each of the three winners, 
and matching jackets and caps. 

The roundup competition included 
a 45-minute written examination of 50 
questions, a parts identification test 
which required contestants to use the 



correct technical terms, and a three- 
part hands-on competition aboard a 
2600 series rail car. 

The hands-on included a 25-minute 
inspection, a window change with a 
maximum 10-minute time limit, and 
trouble-shooting a door problem. 
Maintenance roundup chairperson 
Betty Richman said the faster con- 
testants completed any phase of the 
hands-on competition, the more time 




Second place honors were awarded to repairer Fred Misllin (left), 
combination clerk Michael Keating, and repairer Michael Mallory. 



This proud team placed third in the Maintenance Roundup com- 
petition. They are combination clerk Michael Everett (left), 
foreman Joseph Labellarte, and repairer A.C. Willis. 







Combination clerk Dorothy 
Ballard is flanked by 
repairers Lee Slay (left), and 
team captain Dave Artis, all 
basking with success as 
top prize winners in the first 
CTA Rail Maintenance 
Roundup. 



they could devote to inspecting the 
car. 

Ballard, Slay and Artis tallied 344 
points to top 16 other maintenance 
terminal teams. The four runners-up 
teams were 54th Street terminal, se- 
cond place with 324 points; 
Desplaines, third place, 318; Harlem, 
fourth place, 302: and Rosemont, fifth 
place with 301 points. A second Rose- 
mont team was edged out of fifth place 
by two points. The maximum possible 
score in the competition was 400. 

Second place awards of a radio 
telephone combination, theater 
tickets, and gift certificates were 
awarded to 54th Street terminal 
repairers Fred Misflin, and Michael 
Mallory, and combination clerk 
Michael Keating. 

Third place awards of a travel bag, 
theater tickets and gift certificates went 
to foreman Joseph Labellarte, 
repairer A.C. Willis, and combina- 
tion clerk Michael Everett of 
Desplaines as third prize. Second and 
third place winners also received in- 
dividual plaques. 

Fourth place honors went to assis- 
tant foreman Gary Kemp, and 
repairer Ernest Link of Harlem. 
Members of the Rosemont fifth place 
team were assistant foreman Michael 
Lavelle, Jr., and repairer Oscar 
Flores. All contestants received 
distinctive caps, flashlights, pens, belt 
buckles, and screwdrivers. 

An awards dinner to fete 
maintenance roundup winners was 
planned for Chicago's Pressman Hall 
November 1. Cta 



1&2 



Assistant foreman Kevin Fin- 
negan (inside), and teammate 
Gary Johnson, 61st Street ter- 
minal, work against a 10-minute 
deadline to change a window on 
this 2600 series car. 

Car repairman Anthony Varga of 
Rosemont terminal inspects the 
coupler of this rail car during the 
25-minute hands-on inspection. 
The two man team also included 
54th street terminal car repairer 
Leonard Stryszak. 

Car repairman Rodrigo, 54th 
Street terminal, inspects this car 
for problems which could render 
it out of service. 




This Rosemont terminal team 
takes a crack at parts identifica- 
tion. The trio includes (from left) 
repairer William Nielsen, car ser- 
vicer Julia Velinske, and repairer 
John Josephitis, Jr. 



Repairers Dave Artis and Lee 
Slay, and combination clerk 
Dorothy Ballard meter the power 
as they trouble-shoot the door 
problem. 



«ica\ s«« att ?S 




resp onse 

^ Sa ° ChCZ ' *& 

earns honors 



M»* — - uo\ center vn ^ asyst ope J 

lttn9« 
Sanchez- 



^4-JetferV 

Retirement funds 
may be vested 

If you leave CTA employment 
before you are elfgible to retire, what 
can you do with your pension funds? 
You can request a refund of your con- 
tributions plus interest. Or -- if you 



10 



* uS tt nte N°" e °vSured. „ 
Sho^^tne^ Victor Jot** 
«*>**? ttansU con** * 

^ apl *s praised *° f evacuate 
Ptnates ** \ he \pin9 l ° tiain as 



Cart W»' „ eavW **f 

itom ^e _^ - 



Author 



have at least 10 years of service -- you 
can vest in the Retirement Plan. 

If you vest, you will be entitled to a 
monthly pension once you reach age 
65 even though you have quit working 
for the CTA. Your pension will be 
calculated using the formula in effect 
when you become separated from the 
Authority. 

Vesting may not be for everyone. 
An employee who is leaving the 



and 



...ority and eligible to vest should 
compare the lump sum refund with 
the monthly pension payments 
decide which is better. 

To help you decide, the Pension Of- 
fice will be happy to provide you with 
an estimate of what your pension and 
refund would be. 

Finally, if an employee chooses to 
vest but dies before the pension 
begins, his or her beneficiary will be 
entitled to the contributions and in- 
terest as of the date the employee 
became separated from the CTA. 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 




Corner 



Cleo Jackson (West Section) 
was praised lor her perfor- 
mance as conductor on an 
O'Hare-Congress train ridden 
one Sunday morning by Ellen 
Fitzgibbons, ol North Nagle 
Avenue. "She is the nicest 
conductor I have ever seen: 
very friendly, warm, gentle 
and reassuring. She speaks to 
passengers with a smile. She 
walks up and down the aisles 
to collect the necessary fares 
in a way that you can tell she 
puts herself wholeheartedly 
into her job. She is a cut 
above the average conductor. 
At one point we were delayed 
by track repairs. She would 
reassure those passengers 
who needed it. I felt that even 
if we had an emergency on 
that train, I would feel safe, 
and I never felt that way 
about anyone outside the 
medical profession." 



Atsia Fair (77th Street garage) was commended for 
her handling of a No. 29 State bus ridden by Joureene 
Pannier, of Fern Court. "She makes the ride delightful. 
She is not only courteous, but goes out of her way to be 
helpful. She makes sure that senior citizens are seated 
before pulling off. and she gives directions to questioning 
passengers in a clear, cheerful manner. When people 
leave her bus. they often turn and thank her for making 
the ride so pleasant. It's a pleasure to encounter someone 
who obviously takes her job seriously, and also enjoys it. I 
feel uplifted just for coming in contact with her. She 
makes me feel like a guest on her bus." 

Jerelean Pagan (North Avenue garage) was called 
"an extremely competent bus driver with a professional, 
courteous manner" by Fannie Winterfeld. of Waukegan, 
who was a rider on her No. 53 Pulaski bus. "She was 
quietly alert, without anger, at the foolish car drivers who 
could have caused accidents. Also alert to the teenaged, 
high-spirited passengers in the rear of the bus, as well as 
paying attention to leaving and boarding passengers. She 
was a joy to watch. I am a former Chicagoan riding public 
transportation since 1917 . Chicago has the best transpor- 
tation system I have ever seen in the United States, and I 
have been all over." 

Rosemary Hoskins (North Park garage) was ad- 
mired by Marguerite Backus, of North Michigan Avenue, 
who was a rider on her No. 151 Sheridan bus. "Here was 
this smiling lady saying. 'Good morning' and really mean- 
ing it. Every stop she greeted people the same. Around 
the 500 block of Michigan Avenue many visitors to our ci- 
ty got on . She greeted each one and was as gracious as if 
she were inviting them into her own home. All of the 
people noticed this driver, and everyone was commen- 
ting about her. She is a terrific asset to the CTA. and is 
gracious and real. She has a natural ability to project a 
better image of CTA because she believes in what she's 
doing." 



Wilfredo Soto {West Section) 
was complimented by Arthur 
Hansen, of Oak Park, tor his 
courtesy as a ticket agent at 
Ridgeland on the Lake-Dan 
Ryan route. "We had visitors 
from Wisconsin for the 
weekend, and we thought a 
trip on the El would be a good 
way to show them Chicago. 
The agent at this station went 
out of his way to help us. He 
was cheerful and helpful. He 
not only provided us with 
maps, but also took the time 
to explain how to find certain 
buildings in the Loop, and 
then how to transfer to the 
O'Hare train. He was tolerant 
of our unfamiliarity with the 
system of fares and transfers, 
and we got off to a grand 
start." 



Wilfredo Cuevas (Forest Glen garage) was the 
operator of a No. 5b Milwaukee bus ridden by Theodora 
Gorski. of North Ridgeway Avenue. "I left my bag on the 
bus. I called the CTA office and was told to call back 
about 7 p.m. I did and was told they had my bag at the 
Bryn Mawr (Forest Glen) station. 1 picked it up and found 
all the contents down to the last penny. It would not be 
pleasant to lose $10. but the loss of keys, credit cards and 
my checkbook would cause a lot of inconvenience and 
worry. This man should be praised for his honesty and 
thoughtfulness. In this present world, it lifts the spirits to 
know there are some good people out there." 

Moses Buchanan (77th Street garage) was thanked 
by Beatrice Fairfax, of South Hyde Park Boulevard, who 
was a rider on his No. 6 Jeffery Express bus. "1 am a 
senior citizen, and do have a problem traveling on public 
transportation. Everyone is always telling me 'Be careful.' 
So when I lost my wallet, it had a devastating effect on 
me because my ID cards are important to me. I also had 
two blank checks in the wallet and was afraid someone 
might use them. But lucky me, I received a phone call 
that evening. The bus driver had found the wallet and 
turned it in to the Lost and Found at 77th Street. This 
was a good deed above and beyond the call of duty." 

Three O'Hare route personnel were lauded for their 
help in retrieving a camera bag left on a train by Bruce 
Nesbitt, president of a firm on Northwest Highway. "I im- 
mediately went to the ticket booth at Jefferson Park and 
spoke with a young man (Antonio Narvaez Jr.) who 
asked me appropriate questions and then telephoned to 
get help. Within five minutes he assured me that the bag 
had been located and was in the possession of the train 
motorman. He then instructed me to go back to O'Hare 
to see supervisor Julio Diaz. Diaz even offered me a 
cup of coffee and some cake while I waited. When the 
train arrived, the motorman (Willie Akerson) calmly 
handed me the bag after I identified myself. I would like 
people to know that they are not without help when 
emergencies arise in your fine system." 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



11 



Nutrition and you 



by Elaine Moragne, R.D., M.S. 



Nutrition is something we often treat 
like the weather. We would like to 
have good nutrition, but we tend to 
think there's nothing we can do about 
it. 

That's where we're wrong. We can 
do plenty about it. 

Nutrition is a combination of pro- 
cesses by which food is utilized for 
energy, maintenance of body func- 
tions, growth and renewal. It can be 
good or bad for you, depending upon 
what you choose to eat. 

The major components of nutrition 
are fats, carbohydrates, and protein. 
All produce energy. 

But fats provide twice the calories of 
protein or carbohydrate. Anyone who 
is concerned about weight reduction 
should consider restricting his or her 
consumption of dietary fat from the 
current average of 40 percent to 30 
percent of total calorie intake. 

It is believed that a reduction in 
saturated fats (fats which are solid at 
room temperature) and an increase in 
polyunsaturated fats (fats that are soft 
or liquid at room temperature) can 
lower blood cholesterol levels and pre- 
vent coronary heart disease. 

Carbohydrates are thought to cause 
unwanted pounds. However, it's the 
kind of carbohydrate that matters. 

Complex carbohydrates, such as 



those found in grains, fruits and 
starchy vegetables, are desirable 
because they often contain vitamins 
and minerals. 

Simple refined carbohydrates, like 
sugar, candies and carbonated 
beverages provide calories with no 
nurtitional value. 

Many Americans do not consider 
fiber to be essential to their diets. But 
several protective characteristics have 
been attributed to fiber, which acts like 
a damp sponge by softening stool bulk 
and decreasing the time it takes for 
material to move through the colon. 

The use of fiber is thought to pre- 
vent diverticulitis by reducing the ex- 
posure of the colon to possible cancer- 
causing substances, and by lowering 
blood cholesterol. 

High fiber food include whole grain 
breads, cereals, pasta, brown rice, 
fruits and vegetables, dried beans and 
legumes, nuts and seeds. 

Protein is considered the first 
substance recognized as vital to living 
tissue, since it provides amino acids 
which are needed to make body 
tissue. 

The recommended daily allowance 
for the average adult 170-pound man 
is 62 grams of protein, and for the 
average 120-pound woman, 44 
grams. 




The minimum requirement of pro- 
tein for the adult male is met by eating 
three ounces of beef, a half cup of cot- 
tage cheese, and three ounces of tuna. 

For the adult woman, the suggested 
diet would consist of four ounces of 
broiled fish and three and a half 
ounces of chicken. 

To achieve a sound nutritional 
status, it is important to: 

Select a wide variety of food and 
strive for ideal body weight. 

Avoid foods that are high in 
saturated fat and cholesterol. 

Choose foods composed of com- 
plex carbohydrates and those that are 
high in fiber. 





Ron Catanzaro, superintendent. 
North Avenue garage, is flanked by 
Larry Pianto (left), CTA's chief ad- 
ministrative officer, and Safety 
Manager Tom Boyle as they present 
the north side garage the Interstation 
Safety Plaque for the second and third 
quarters of 1985. Honored 12 times 



for its safety record. North Avenue 
had the best second quarter passenger 
rate in the system and 29 accident-free 
days in the third quarter. Safety 
honors for the 10th time are also ac- 
corded Douglas Park terminal as 
Patrick O'Malley (right) accepts the 
second quarter Interstation Safety 



Plaque for the west side terminal 
which experienced only one accident 
during this recording period. O'Hare 
terminal was also a third quarter win- 
ner of the Public Safety honor. It was 
the 18th time O'Hare has received the 
award. 

eta 



12 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Body builder 




Westside motorman Quentin 
Michalczewski, a body builder, 
displays the trophies and medallion 
awarded him for his 1985 third place 
finish in the "Mr. Prairie State" 
Master Division Open at 
Wheaton/ Warren ville Middle School 
recently. Quentin placed fifth in the 
same contest a year ago. Quentin said 
he plans to participate in the 1987 
"Mr. America" competition. He has 
been a CTA employee since May 
1973. 



Finishing 
clerk 
earns 
degree 

in 
naprapathy 



CTA duplicating finishing clerk 
Olivia P. Thompson is now Dr. 
Olivia P. Thompson since com- 
pleting all requirements for a degree in 
the science of naprapathy. 

Her October 12 graduation from the 
Chicago National College of 
Naprapathy ends a five-year degree 
pursuit followed by a 12-month intern- 
ship which Mrs. Thompson served at 
the school's Milwaukee avenue clinic. 
Commencement exercises are set for 
the Bunker Hill Country Club in nor- 
thwest suburban Niles. 

Dr. Thompson's immediate plans 
call for working weekends and some 




evenings at her new practice, with a 
view towards setting her shingle out 
for a full time practice later. 

A 14-year CTA employee, she is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
P. Woods, whom she credits with the 
moral support needed for her 
endeavors, along with the support 
provided by her children. North Cen- 
tral College aeronautical engineering 
student and track star Gerald L. 
Thompson, Jr., and daughter, Hol- 
ly, a junior at Unity high school. 



TWUfor a job WELL DONE! 



Employees who have received 
Com mendations from the public. 



Shahid Abdullah, 77th Street 


Curtis Esters, North Park 


William Mandeldove Jr., 1 rest Glen 


Richard Sims. Howard Kimball 


Hasan Abed. Archer 




Albert Mangram, North Avenue 


Dexter Smith, Limils 


Maria Agnew, Limits 


William Finley Jr., North Avenue 


William Markowski, Forest Glen 


JoAnn Stallworth. North A 


Leftherry Andoniadis, North Park 


James Fitzgerald, Limits 


Charles Martin, Archer 


Billy Stanback. N rth Park 
Frank Slaszak. Ai 


Rogelio Arrazola. North Park 


Karl Fleming. 77th Street 


Camille Mathews. .Jefferson Park 


Hettie Atkins. North Park 




Calvin McCants. b9th Street 




Tommie Garner, North Park 


Vivian McDonald. 77th Street 


James Strickland. ' ' 


Rudolph Blakemore, North Avenue 


David Gaston. North Park 


David Metken, North Avenue 


Robert Surita. 77th Streel 


Vicki Bledsoe, Howard Kimball 


Jeffrey Gilbert. Howard Kimball 


Dana Mimms, 77th Street 


Thomas Szpekowski. \ 


Ramona Bolden, 77th Street 


Wallacene Good, Forest Glen 






James Boyd Jr.. North Park 


Louis Greene Jr.. 77th Street 


Antonio Narvaez Jr., West Sectioi 


Curtis Thompson Jr.. 77ll 


Delphine Brown, Limits 






Reginald Tolbert. North Park 


Medrick Bussie, Kedzie 


Donnie Hanna. Archer 


Araceli Olivier. North Park 


Blanca Torres, f rest Glen 




William Henderson Jr., North Park 


Pedro Orozco. N 


Barbara Tribble. Archer 


Angel Cabrera, North Park 


Peyton Hightower, 77th Street 




Rodney Trussell, North Avenue 


Jean Cage, North Park 


Roger Hudson, 77th Street 


John Paczkowski, An hei 


Willie Turner. 69tl Street 


Sergio Candelaria, Limits 




Walter Payne. 77th Street 




Eloise Carter, 77th Street 


Joseph Jackson, Limits 
Perry Jackson Jr.. 69th Street 


Willena Pierson, 69lh Street 


Frank Vazquez, f . 


llda Castellanos-Wadde, North Park 


Jackie Pritt. Rail D 




Felicia Clower. Limits 

Richard Corbett. Howard Kimball 


Lewis Johnson. 77th Street 
Cedric Johnson, K^d."«' 


Richard Ross. M 1 Kimball 


Elizabeth Washington. 77ll Stn i 
William Washington. 77th Streel 


Griz Craig, North Park 


Richard Jones, 77th Street 


Tanette Russell. West Section 


Patrick Werner. Howard Kimball 


Bernardino Juarez, Limits 




Ricky Wetherspoon. North Park 


Dorothy Davis, Kedzte 


Karie Kareem. North Park 


Willie Sandifer. 77tl Streel 


Walter White. B. 


Electra De Alba, North Avenue 




Frank Schulget Jr., West Section 


Henderson Willi.ims. 


Herman Duffin, Forest Glen 


Hollis Lewis Jr., North Avenue 


Roy Shores. 77tl 




John Durnell, Archer 


Jesus Limas, North Park 


Melbernlce Simmons. 


Alex Ybarra. Limits 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



13 




mm 




Internal Audit 

Special October birthday accolades 
for Marcelo Reyes, Chet 

Mangalik, and Joe Brzegowy of this 
department. . .Congratulations to 
John Kurtovich and Maureen 

Danaher of the Capital Development 
Department on their recent engage- 
ment. The happy couple have already 
set the wedding date for August 16, 
1986. Promotional Services Assistant 
Helene Greiman and Stu Evans 
were engaged on September 16. The 
wedding has been set for April 20, 
1986. This reporter's best wishes go to 
the happy couples. . .Vacationing in 



SERVICE 
ANNIVERSARIES 

35 Years 

Jake Reed Jr., Archer 
Thomas Spencer, 77th Street 

30 Years 

Alan Downing, Mech Maint. 
Charles Dunkins, Track & Roadway 
Anthony Espinosa, North Avenue 
Luther Lee, 77th Street 
Charles Spears, Ashland 

25 Years 



David Bowman, North Park 

Louis Dovichi, North Avenue 

John Doyle. South Shops 

Leo Flynn, Gen'l Maint. 

Robert Ford, 77th Street 

Karl Gaeger, Treasury 

Curtis Haskell, Sig. Phone & Radio 

Samy Jefferson, South Shops 

Frank Klekovitch, Ashland 

Robert Lewis, North Avenue 

George Lindsey, Howard/Kimball 

Albert Lowery, North Park 

Carl Lyday, Howard/Kimball 

Hugh Masterson, Bus Pers. -North 

Frank Montefalco, Esc Mtce 

Anthony Polich, South Shops 

Garland Rhines, North Park 

Carl Suddeth. North Park 

John Turner, 69th Street 

Early Watson Jr., Archer 

Laurance Weathersby Jr., 69th Street 

Gerald Wilson, Field Review 

Thomas Wilson, Instruction 



Hawaii was Tony Ambut of the Com- 
munications Section. He said he was 
gone "only two weeks," but in that two 
weeks he visited friends, toured three 
islands, and witnessed volcano activity 
on the Big Island. Sounds wonderful 
to this reporter, who stayed behind 
and answered his phones... This is the 
smile we got from seven-month old 
Tina Reene after she read her latest 







copy of Transit News with all the latest 
Inside News. Tina is the daughter of 
Thomas Izzo, a pipe fitter at West 
Shops, and the granddaughter of 
Herman Izzo, a CTA retiree who 
formerly worked in the Vehicle 
Maintenance Shops... The American 
Public Transportation Association 
(APTA) provided an interesting 
seminar to Jack Sowchin of the 
Publications Section, who attended. 
The "Adwheel" Jack's section put 
together won an Honorable Mention 
for CTA. After the seminar. Jack 
spent an additional week in California 
visiting relatives and seeing the 
sights. ..The beautiful paintings 
displayed throughout the Public Af- 
fairs Department are for sale by the ar- 
tist. See this reporter for details. 

Joyce Petrich 



Harlem Shop 

A spelling correction is in order for 
Shop Foreman Al Crawford, which 



was spelled Cranford in Vol. 38, Nos. 
5-6 issue of Transit News. Our 
apologies, AC. Speaking of Mr. 
Crawford, he has, since his capture of 
Harlem Shop as foreman, graduated 
from assistant foreman. John 
Chalmers went to Wilson Shop, and 
Gary Kemp to 54th Street Shop. 
A.C. is currently training a rookie. An- 
dre Brewster. ..Herman Swoope 
and your reporter, Mike McGuin- 
ness, have worked together as 
weekend repairmen for six years, and 
claim to be the best salt-and -pepper 
team in the system. No wonder the 
Lake-Dan Ryan line runs so 
smoothly... Repairers and families who 
enjoyed vacations outside the United 
States are: Wilson Mollfulleda in 
Puerto Rico; Thomas Warchol in 
Paris, France; Rich Plomin in 
Hawaii; Joe Andruk and Norm 
Hunt in Warsaw, Poland; Gary 
Kemp and wife, Debbie, two great 
weeks in West Germany. Nice to have 
money!.. Office Clerk Joey Nicosia's 
wife. Janice, gave birth to a beautiful 
baby girl, Kristen Elizabeth, on 
August 10, weighing 9 lbs. 9 oz. Look 
out, Joey and Janice!.. Everyone had 
a tremendous time at Frank Chiap- 
petta's retirement in June. Frank 




(left) is being congratulated by Rail 
Superintendent Richard Lorimer. 
Our thanks to W. J. Kincaid for the 
photo... Tom Togher celebrated 37 
years with CTA September 18. Keep 
going, Tom. ..Rich Urban is 
recuperating from a sprained wrist he 
got playing softball. Good luck. Rich! 
Mike McGuinnes 

North Avenue 

29 Years! And everyone of those 
years driving a bus from at North 
Avenue! That's what our recent retiree 
Louis Berry closes his career with as 
an operator. For those of us who at- 
tended Lou's retirement party at his 



14 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



home, it was quite an evening. Perfect 
weather, plenty of yard to walk and 
relax in , and definitely lots of food and 
spirits. Lou's wife, Phyllis, was the 
perfect hostess. Perhaps now that 
Lou's retired, his wife and he will be 
using more of that fancy 16-foot 
catamaran we noted sitting in the 
yard... Jim Davis probably made 
good of his CTA driving skills as he, 
his wife and their two children putt- 
putted in Cumberland Gap, Kentucky 
on a recent vacation. Jim mentions 
that he also celebrates his 25th year as 
an operator and hopes to join some 
special club for senior drivers. What 
club, Jim??. Martha Flores would like 
to express her appreciation for the 
many kindnesses and sincerities ex- 
tended to her during the loss of her 
young daughter. Martha, age 5. who 
had been ill with leukemia and yet, still 
gave her mother that little smile even 
when she wasn't feeling well... John 
Curran (Fullerton) recently overheard 
counting aloud that he has a mere 95 
more working days and then he'll be 
using that pensioner's riding card... A 
pat on the back and thank you's for all 
concerned on helping North Avenue 
win its Second Quarter Safety Award. 
Enjoy the refreshments being served 
operators. Let's try and repeat this 
again soon... Looking forward to his 
retirement after a total of 40 years ser- 
vice with CTA is our switchboard 
operator, Charles Luepke. Enjoy 
the coming years in good health. 
Charles... Congratulations to Operator 
David James, who managed to be in 
CTA's 1985 Bus Roadeo and came 
away with a third place showing. Who 
knows, this may be our future 1986 
champion!.. Well, what can you say to 



racetrack recently and will share in that 
jackpot of nearly $734,000. Curtis 
bought sweetrolls and coffee for the 
station, and we can only wonder did 
anyone bite into a sweetroll with a hid- 
den $1,000 bill? HAH!.. Our con- 
gratulations to the 1985 CTA Softball 
League champions: First Place, North 
Park Breezers. and Second Place. 
North Park Styx. Pictured in the first 




photo with the Second Place Trophy 
are David Washington (left). Union 
Representative, and Kevin Grayer, 

outfielder for Styx. In the second 
photo are the first place winners, the 




insr 3m:e3S/Io:r.i.a.:m: 



ROY C. BAIRD. 

I [. n . 4-8-44. Dii 
WILLIAM C. BRIGHT. 66, Howard 

Imp J 26 66 I lied 8-6-85 
DAVID R BRUMIRSKI. 59 69tl Streel 

I mp 9 9 46 Died 8 Zi 
WILLIAM C BUETOW. 78, North A 

l.mp 8-17-3 Died 9 .' B i 
ANTHONY CARR. 79 North Si 
i 10-10 Z9 Died 10-4-85 
JOHN FOLLY. 89 W>. & Slrucl 

I mp 1 1 . 12 I lie 1 9-2; 35 
RAYMOND HOROSZKO. 65 Nortl Ave 

Emp s 11 45 Died 9 14 8 > 
ALVIN HUBBARD. 65. Maintenance. 

I mp 11-3-49. Dii 
ERNEST A. HUCKSOLL. V North Park 

I mp 1 1 o I I Died 9 29 s : , 
PAUL D. JONES. Forest! Il< n 

Emp 11 28 42 Dii d 9-4-8 
ROSCOE P. JONES, 77. North Avenue, 

Emp l-2£ ; ! Dii 
THOMAS KALLAL. 93, Lawndale, 

Emp 9 18 17, Died 9-18 3 i 
ADOLPH A. KUTZ. 76 Electrical. 

Emp 1 7-29. Died 9-9-85 
RICHARD F. MACKIL. 84 69th Streel 

Emp 6 27 23. Died 'I 15 85 
DOMINICK F. NAPOLEON. 67 Forest Glen. 

Emp 10 22 41, Died 9 8 - i 
OLAFE. PETERSEN. 84. North Section 

Emp 9-5-46, Died 8 2 
STEPHEN M. PLASZCZEWSKI. 74. Skokie. 

Emp. 5-24 39 Die I 8-4-85 
CHARLES F. POSCH. 74. Beverly. 

Emp 11-22-46. Died 9-30 8 i 
LLOYD RAMSEY. 63. Limits. 

Emp b 20 57 Died 9-13 B5 
JOHN J. SLOVACEK. 87. Congress 

Emp 6 14 16. Died 9 8 85 
CHARLES M. SMITH. 85 Insura 

Emp 6-16-26. Died 9 25 - i 
DAVID SMITH. b4. South Shops. 

Emp. 3-6-51. Di< d 8-12-85 
LEROY SUTTON. 71 West Section. 

Emp 9-11-52. Died 8 9 3 i 



Pensioners 



Curtis Banks besides W-O-W!! 

Operator Banks, as you surely know Breezers' Claudis Toran (left) and 

by now, was one of two winners at the Jerome Towns, team captain. 

Mike Flores 


EARLIE L. BRYANT. Bus Operatoi 

North Avenue. Emp 7-11-55 
FRANCIS M. FLYNN. Bus Repairer, 

Beverly. Emp. 8-20-47 
ROBERT G. GAFENEY, Ticket Agent. 

Howard . Emp 1 6 58 
THEODORE GREGORY. Architect. 

Fac Eng & Maml . Emp 5-25-74 
SEYMOUR KANTOR. Bus Operator. 

69th Street. Emp 11-2-61 
GEORGE J. LAICA. Audit Clerk V. 

Opeis | ield Re\ 1 mp 11 23-45 
MYROSLAW NIMYLOWYCZ. Bus Operator. 

'. '■ ! : ; 9-15-58 
JESSE W. RICHARDSON. Motorman 

95th Stn el 1 mp 1 i 50 
DRACO E. SLAUGHTER. Bus Operatoi 

77th Stn . : l ,i ; 
DOROTHY V. WAYNER. Ticket Agent. 
Emp 1-11-67 


Begins medical training 

Dorothy M. Jones, 21, daughter 

of CTA West Shops carpenter Paul 
Jones, and payroll clerk Robbie 
Jones, Merchandise Mart, is a 
freshman medical student at the 
University of Illinois. 

Miss Jones is a 1985 graduate of the 
University of Chicago where she 
received a bachelor of arts degree in 
biological science. 





1985 Vol. 38 — No. 9 



15 




Investor Life 
representatives 

Members of this group of Investor Life representatives are visiting 
various CTA work locations for the next several months to discuss 
the new voluntary Universal Life Insurance program now being of- 
fered through payroll deduction. Seated are (from left) Irvin Burks, 
Lionel Abdul-Haqq, Cynthia Cooper, Bill Sauter, Lee Estus, 
and Wayne Gregory. Standing: Ray Adams, Bill Bettis, Bill 
Gannon, Morgan Carter, and Johnnie Campbell. Represen- 
tatives will continue to be available to CTA employees for account 
service following initial enrollment. Offices of Investor Life Service 
are located at 222 West Adams Street. For further information 
employees should call 263-0356/57. 



Front Cover Captions 

CTA Chairman Michael A. Cardilli 

greeting honorees and special guests, 
called the moment "rewarding" and 
expressed appreciation for the efforts 
CTA employees put forth each day. 



Striving for Excellence subcommittee 
chairpersons arrived early to handle 
last minute details. They are (from left) 
Bob Aldworth, Operations Planning, 
decorating/graphics; Bill Sholdice, 
Operations, publicity/program; 
Virginia McGraw, Engineering and 
Maintenance, and Paul Kadowaki, 
Operations, seating/hospitality; 
Florence Salus, Engineering and 
Maintenance, event vice chairperson; 
Linda Grysbeck, Operations, event 
chairperson; Tony Borcic, Opera- 
tions, administration; Mark Dun- 
dovich, Engineering and 
Maintenance, advertising sales/- 
promotions; Bob Bizar, Communica- 
tions, entertainment /audio -visual; 
Clark Carter, Operations, advertis- 
ing sales/promotions. 



Transit News is published for employees and retirees of CTA • Editorial and graphics by the Public Affairs Department, Bill Baxa, Manager • Direc- 
tor of Publications: JackSowchin; Editor Rick Willis • Graphic Designers: A. V. Eiva and Alan Grady • Contributing Writers: Jeff Stern, Don Yabush 

• Typesetting and printing provided by the Management Services Department • Distributed free of charge to all active and retired CTA employees 

• Annual subscription price to others, $5 • CTA TRANSIT NEWS, Room 734, Merchandise Mart Plaza, P.O. Box 3555, Chicago, IL 60654. 



CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY 
P. 0. Box 3555. Chicago, Illinois 60654 



BULK RATE 

Paid 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PERMIT NO. 8021 
CHICAGO. ILL. 



Kef Transit News 



Vol.38, No.11, #12,1985, For Chicago Transit Authority Employee: 



i n 



Tu 




a< 



OP6 SSce 




We, 



'elcoming in the New Year was 
more than a late-night celebration for 
CTA. It was the climax to a year that 
saw progress in a number of areas af- 
fecting both employee and rider 
satisfaction, as well as CTA's commit- 
ment to public service. 

The year ended, in fact, with a final 
example of concern for the public --the 
offer of free rides on CTA trains and 
buses from 8 p.m. on New Year's Eve 
until 6 a.m. New Year's Day -- to 
reduce the risk of accidents by revelers 



who might otherwise consider driving 
their own vehicles. 

Increased promotional activity was 
one of the most notable changes at 
CTA in 1985, raising public awareness 
of CTA not only as a provider of 
transportation, but also as an agency 
willing to become involved in public 
service issues. 

The Public Affairs Department's 
Promotional Services section, under 
the direction of Terry Hocin, made 
CTA the first transit agency in the na- 
tion to take part in the campaign to 
find missing children. Beginning in 



February, two missing children car 
cards, each showing two children, 
were made up each month for posting 
on buses and trains. Fully half of the 
38 children pictured were later 
located. 

A new full-color map appeared 
around Valentine's Day. featuring 
easier-to-read graphics, simplified 
route descriptions, and first and last 
trip departure times for routes that 
don't have 24-hour service. Still more 
improvements have been added to the 
1986 map. 

Perhaps the most welcome innova- 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



tion of the year was the introduction of 
new fareboxes for CTA buses. The 
fareboxes, which accept dollar bills in 
one slot and coins in another, elec- 
tronically register the value of the coins 
deposited. The bills are drawn 
lengthwise into the fareboxes in such a 
way that each one can be viewed by 
the operator. 

Substantial savings are expected 
from an end to such practices as inser- 
ting folded half or whole dollar bills in- 
to the old fareboxes, which jammed 
them, forcing buses out of service. Ex- 
tra expense was also needed to repair 
the jammed boxes, and to open and 
count the folded bills. 

Refitting of all older buses to provide 
windows that open was achieved in 
1985, finally providing a logical 
answer to the insurmountable problem 
of maintaining functional air- 
conditioning on the surface fleet. 

About two-thirds of an order for 362 
new buses arrived from the M.A.N. 
Truck and Bus Company of Charlotte, 
N.C., during the year. Besides having 
sliding and hopper windows for in- 
creased air circulation, these buses 
also feature digital electronic destina- 
tion signs that can be programmed for 
any route, thereby eliminating the 
need to change roller curtains when 
transferring vehicles from one garage 
to another. 

By year's end, CTA had received 
about three-fourths of its order for 600 
new (2600-series) rapid transit cars 
from Transit America Inc. (formerly 
known as the Budd Company) of 
Philadelphia. In addition, 45 older 
cars were put back into service on the 
Evanston and Skokie routes after be- 
ing completely rehabilitated. 

O'Hare Airport service was the 
focus of extensive promotional effort 
in 1985, and the results could be seen 
in ever-growing ridership. Prizes were 
awarded in a May ceremony honoring 
the one millionth rider to enter the 
O'Hare station terminal. In 
September, Mayor Harold 
Washington was on hand to announce 
the winner of a contest to guess the 
number of riders boarding at O'Hare 
during its first year of operation. 

Work was about half -finished, at 
year's end, on a new garage at 103rd 
and Stony Island Avenue that is 
scheduled for completion in the spring 
of next year. By this summer, work 
will begin on demolishing North 
Avenue garage in preparation for con- 



From the Chairman 



A banner year of 
community service 



Tis the season to be reflective. 

We can look back upon our 
numerous accomplishments of the 
past year with grateful acknowledg- 
ment and thanksgiving, and I would 
like to offer my sincere thanks to all 
CTA employees for your efforts and 
professionalism that made our ac- 
complishments possible. 

1985 was indeed a banner year. A 
record number of outstanding 
employees were honored at our 
"Striving for Excellence" celebration, 
and our operations and maintenance 
skill competitions attracted the 
highest level of employee participa- 
tion. 

Our fleet modernization has con- 
tinued to move ahead steadily. Dur- 
ing the year CTA took delivery of 
over 300 new buses, and our current 
order of 600 rapid transit cars is right 
on schedule with completion due by 
Spring, 1987. 

Although it appears that CTA has 
turned the corner, we must continue 
to remember that the riding public, 
who pay our salaries with their tax 
dollars, rightfully expect excellence 
in both the operation of our service 
and the cleanliness and maintenance 
of our vehicles. There is no one area 
at CTA that can be said to have ex- 
celled completely in serving the 
public. We must continue to strive 
toward this end. 

Capital improvements have again 
enabled us to plan ahead for our 
future needs. The Howard-Dan 



Ryan transit project, underway since 
November 14, will realign and link 
these two rapid transit lines, pairing 
transit lines with similar ridership 
levels. Increased track capacity will 
be provided, and yard facilities for 
the two lines will be expanded. 

Our increased promotional ac- 
tivities have benefited the community 
and CTA. More than half of the mis- 
sing children who appeared on car 
cards in CTA vehicles have been 
located, and, in cooperation with the 
Chicago Police Department, our 
Fingerprint Bus has provided 
thousands of fingerprint and photo 
portfolios for parents of young 
children. Ridership on our new rapid 
transit service to O'Hare Interna- 
tional Airport increased more than 
30% during 1985 as a direct result of 
promotional activities. 

As we look forward to 1986, we 
are proud to be moving ahead with 
an outstanding work force of CTA 
employees whose dedication to ser- 
vice made 1985 so successful. I am 
sure the same excellence and en- 
thusiasm will continue to make CTA 
a leader in the transit industry 
through the new year. 

Thank you for your outstanding 
performance in 1985. and best 
wishes for continued prosperity in 
the new year. 



4— Con- 




struction of a new facility on the same 
site. 

The year 1985 also witnessed the 
opening volley in CTA's new war on 
graffiti. The campaign included crea- 



tion of a program to educate Chicago 
students about the costs and effects of 
vandalism and graffiti. Apprehended 
vandals were put to work cleaning up 
their acts. 



1985 Vol. 38— No. 11 & 12 



National Safety Council 

lauds 

CTA's 
Tom Boyle 



Thomas D. Boyle, CTA manager 
of Safety, has received the National 
Safety Council's Distinguished Service 
to Safety Award. 

The award is the highest honor 
given to an individual by the Council 
in recognition of outstanding service in 
the field of safety. Boyle was selected 
by the Council's Motor Transportation 
Division for his contribution to safety in 
the nation's public transit field. 

He was cited for his part in develop- 
ing and implementing safety courses 
for the U.S. Urban Mass Transporta- 
tion Administration's Transportation 



Safety Institute in Oklahoma City, and 
recognized for his extensive work as 
chairman of the American Public 
Transit Association (APTA) Rail Safe- 
ty Committee. 

Boyle has served on the National 
Safety Council's board of directors and 
is past chairman of the Council's 
Motor Transportation Division and 
Transit Executive Committee. 




The award, in the form of a plaque, 
was presented to Boyle during the 
73rd Annual National Safety Council 
Congress and Exposition held in New 
Orleans, October 28-31. 



Clerk win$ at big buck$ bingo 






I^TA token clerk Miguel Manso col- 
lected $100 November 5 by playing 
"Big Bucks Bingo," which is broadcast 
over WC1U-TV, Channel 26, and pro- 
moted by CTA. 

Manso of the CTA treasury depart- 
ment has played the game since its 
October 28 premiere. Broadcast in 
both Spanish and English, the game is 
played Monday through Friday from 
6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. The grand prize 
for Big Bucks Bingo is $10,000 and a 
new car. 



Bingo winners must call in their win- 
ning card by 7:15 p.m. of the same 
evening, or mail the card to the station 
immediately to claim a prize. "I had no 
trouble getting them when 1 won ," said 
Manso who collected his money the 
next day. The November 5 jackpot of 
$200 was split with another winner, 
Manso said. 

Bingo cards are available at 15 
selected locations selling the CTA 
monthly pass, all Dominick super 
markets, and several other Chicago 
and suburban locations. 




CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Day 

in 

CTA 



Bus controller Anthony Berry 
(right), explains the bus con- 
troller's function in the CTA 
Operations control center to 
"Day in CTA" honorees (from 
left) James Sledge, "B" 
district; Clardy Wells, 
Howard terminal; Kenneth 
Johnson, "B" district; and 
Joseph Folken, O'Hare ter- 
minal. 





"Day in CTA" honorees get a look 
at rail control operations as Al 
Fleming (left) explains pro- 
cedures. Control center guests are 
Ronald Ricks, Eddie Iqbal, 
Frederick Smith, and Royster 
Lowery. 

J\. conductor and five motormen 
who responded to several unusual oc- 
currences on their respective rapid 
transit routes have received special 
recognition as Day in CTA honorees. 

Motorman Royster Lowery and 
conductor Ronald Ricks, both of 
Howard terminal, distinguished 
themselves when they assisted 
another train crew in the evacuation of 
riders following a spontaneous fire 
aboard the train. 

A passenger who wrote CTA regar- 
ding the incident said . "The conduct of 
CTA personnel on the burning train as 
well as on the rescue train definitely 
saved lives; they placed their own lives 
in jeopardy." 

Meanwhile, Howard motorman 
Clardy Wells distinguished himself 
by operating his North-South train 
safely after it developed faulty brakes. 
Wells notified the control center of his 
situation and was instructed to operate 
to Sheridan station. Operations 
management said Wells' job 
knowledge, attention to duty and abili- 



honors eight employees 



ty to follow instructions allowed him to 
operate the train without injury to 
riders or damage to property, or 
equipment. 

West-South motorman Frederick 
Smith of 61st Street received 
management's accolades for his alert 
response to an incident which lead to 
the arrest of a man who was threaten- 
ing another rider with a knife. 

In another rescue effort, O'Hare 
motorman Eddie Iqbal earned kudos 
when he stopped his West-Northwest 
train as it approached Western 
Avenue on the Congress route where 
Iqbal saw a man on the tracks. The 
man, a robbery victim, was removed 
from the tracks by the motorman after 
the third rail power was cut. A Fire 
Department ambulance arrived and 
transported the man to the hospital. 

Joseph Folken, another O'Hare 
motorman, also received special 
thanks as a Day in CTA honoree for 
his response to a situation in which a 
would-be pickpocket was attempting 
to rifle the pockets of a sleeping 
passenger who turned out to be an off- 
duty policeman 

Folken had berthed his train and 



was proceeding to the trainroom when 
he observed the attempted robbery in 
progress. He returned to the train 
through the emergency door and the 
man fled to another train only to be ar- 
rested by police. 

Bus supervisor James Sledge of 
District "B" exemplified service 
beyond the call of duty and earned 
special recognition when he 
volunteered his free time to assist 
other District "B" surface supervisors 
who were called upon to provide shut- 
tle service to accommodate riders of a 
derailed West-Northwest train at Cen- 
tral Park. 

A Day in CTA commendation was 
also earned by District "B" bus super- 
visor Kenneth Johnson who came 
to the rescue of a rider aboard a Jef- 
fery Express bus whose purse was 
grabbed by a man at Hyde Park and 
Lake Park Avenues. After a bystander 
notified him of the incident. Super- 
visor Johnson intervened and ap- 
prehended the purse snatcher who 
was attempting to exit the bus through 
the rear door. The offender was sur- 
rendered to police, and the rider's 
purse was returned to her. 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 11 & 12 




Corner 



Hasan Abed (Archer garage) 

was thanked for his concern as 

operator of a No. 62 Archer 

bus ridden by Sandy Barnes, 

of West 55th Street. ' 7 was 

sitting on the bus alone one 

evening, and as it began to 

empty out, two young men 

came from the back. One sat in 

the seat in front of me with his 

legs across the seat beside 

him, and the other sat next to 

me. I was uncomfortable, to 

say the least, as there were 

hardly any other passengers on 

the bus. A little while later, the 

driver stopped the bus, walked 

back to where we were silting, 

and told the men he would not 

move the bus until they moved 

away from me. He deserves 

recognition. " 



Antonio Acevedo (West Section) impressed Royal 
Corbin, of West Congress Parkway, with his courtesy 
and patience as ticket agent at Washington in the Dear- 
born subway. "It took me a while to find my transfer, and 
after I did locate it, and handed it to him, he told me it 
was no good because the time had run out on it. I 
became angry, yet he stayed calm, and it took me even 
longer to find a token and dime for my fare , causing a line 
to form behind me. Yet your employee even thanked me 
for my fare. Only upon reflection did I realize his 
courteous manner. If only more people had such calm in 
the midst of our city." 

Pauline Merriweather (69th Street garage) was ap- 
preciated for her courtesy as operator of a No. 8 Halsted 
bus by Christine Sullivan, of West 80th Street. "While 
I was coming up the ramp from the Congress 'L' station, 
this operator was picking up passengers heading south on 
Halsted Street. They had already boarded when I was still 
quite a ways down the ramp. But she waited for me! I just 
want to let you know that she is a very courteous and 
sensitive person, and a good driver as well. I wish all my 
rides on CTA vehicles were as enjoyable as the one with 
operator #13034." 



Jesse Howard (77th Street garage) was admired by 
Anita Rosenthal, of King Drive, who was a rider on his 
No. 3 King Drive bus. "I have never been on a bus where 
the driver was like him. Every stop was called loudly and 
clearly. Important transfer points for other routes were 
pointed out, our Art Institute was proudly called, and so 
on . Mr. Howard was kind and concerned about everyone 
getting on and off. I felt I must write and tell you about 
him. We certainly could use more drivers like Mr. 
Howard, and I hope I will be on his bus again soon. It was 
truly a great experience - and a surprise." 



Robert Harper (77th Street 
garage) was applauded by 
Gladys Reed, of Merrill Avenue, 
and three other riders on his 
No. 87 87th bus. "We the 
regular passengers on the 87th 
Street route feel it is our duty 
to tell you of our high regards 
for this driver. He is always on 
schedule, is courteous, and 
always has a nice warm smile 
and 'Hello '. He handles unruly 
passengers with tact and 
diplomacy. His consideration is 
most appreciated because he 
drives the next to the last bus 
going east at 1 a.m., when we 
are getting off from work, and 
he waits for us at the Dan Ryan 
'L' station even if our train is 
late getting in." 



Jerome Perdue (Limits garage) was the operator of a 
No. 151 Sheridan bus that Irene Miller, of North 
Sheridan Road, boarded at Water Tower Place. "Shortly 
after I boarded, I heard a woman's voice saying 
something about her wallet being stolen. In an instant, 
the driver stopped his bus and attempted to apprehend 
the pickpocket. I was unable to witness the final result, 
but driver #13208 did fully exercise his responsibility. 
One of the passengers said, 'Don't you think that this bus 
driver should be commended for his quick-acting 
response?' and almost all of us replied with a 'Yes' and 
even applause." 

Angel Mojica (North Park garage) was complimented 
by Howard Jaffe, of Sherwin Avenue, for his courtesy 
as operator of a No. 49B North Western bus. "I was walk- 
ing toward the bus stop at Chase when I saw a bus com- 
ing. 1 was some distance from the stop, and I stretched 
my arm out to alert the driver that I would like to board. 
Then I started jogging toward the bus stop, where 
nobody else was waiting. The bus driver slowed down, 
pulled over to the stop, and opened the doors, just to let 
me know he'd be waiting for me. I am a senior citizen, 
and thanked him for his consideration, which saved me 
at least a 12-minute wait." 

Vincent Dawson (Forest Glen garage) was saluted in 
poetry by Michelle Johnson, of West Lake Street, who 
was a rider on his No. 152 Addison bus. "For a trip that 
can't be beat, Driver 7699 is the dude to meet. I have to 
laugh, just because He cracks me up with the things he 
does. To find his bus is not a big feat. He drives by Schurz 
High on Addison St. 'Line Instructor 7699' his name I 
don't know. He can handle the bus like a pro. CTA 
should be thankful for a man like this. It's him the riders 
would surely miss. This complimentary rap I present to 
CTA. Thank you and 7699... You made my day!" 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



ESS-"" 




Photos, top left to bottom right: Rail 
tour host and Culture Bus coor- 
dinator Jeff Stern welcomed guests 
and provided commentary; Promo- 
tional Services representative 
Helene Greiman helped set up 
hors d' oeuvres on the train; 
hospitality industry guests included 
representatives of McCormick 
Place and the Knickerbocker 
Hotel; rapid transit cars in Skokie 
Shops formed a unique dinner set- 
ting that guests would long 
remember; wearing his vintage con- 
ductor's uniform. Public Information 
coordinator and co-host Ron 
Weslow checked tickets on the rail 
tour that he had organized. 




CTA's Culture Bus service in 1985 
recorded a five percent increase in 
ridership over the comparable period 
of the previous year. To show ap- 
preciation for the efforts of our 
volunteer commentators and provide 
a final promotional thrust for 1985, a 
rail tour-dinner was held December 6 
on CTA's historic cars, which had 
Skokie Shop as a destination. 



Other guests included hospitality in- 
dustry representatives, such as hotel 
management personnel, state and city 
tourism officials, and the directors of 
museums along the Culture Bus 
routes. All helped to promote CTA 
service in 1985, and we wanted to 
show our interest in their continuing 
cooperation in the years ahead. 



TWUior a job 
WELL DONE! 



Paul Alexander Jr , 
i alius An hlla, 
Rogello Arra/ola. N 
Delberl Ashfnrd. 
Lull Aviles. 
.lu.iii Aviles, ' 

I mi si Barnes, 
Jose Ban era, A 
Jacqueline Bern*. .V 

Shirley Beater, 

Arlle Border*, 69ll Street 

Bill Broun, 

Jean < aqe, 

John Cameron, A 
James I arson, \ . 
Denise Cherry. 
Jerry Conner. '■ 

Jesse ( i>\ 

Grl2 Craiu 
David Cur ley, R 

Robert Curley, I 
William Downs 

Raphael Emery, 

( urtla Esters, North Pari 

Dorothy Flournoy, 77th Streel 
Anselmo (un i.i 
Wallacene Good. I 
Raymond Gosha, 
Dorothy Graham. 
Richard Grout. 

William Hill. I m is 

Sanders Imgram 

William James 

Lewis Johnson. 77th Streel 

Robert Johnson. 
Anthony Jones. 
Lester Jones. North Park 
Kenneth Jones 

James Kolstad. Beverly 
Robert Kremer. 

Fred Labern. N 
Carl Lambert. . 
Charley Lane. I li 
Nathaniel Lee Jr., Ashland 
James Lewis, 69l 
Jesus Limas. '■ 
Ted Lingo. 77ll 
Alfonzo Luclous. 69l 

Michael Maines. I i TCSl Glen 
Kevin Majors. 77 5treel 
Louis Maravllla. ~ Streel 
William Marknuski. I rest I 
Cornelius Marshall. '■■ 
Daniel Martin. I 
Angel Martinez, 
James McDonald. K< 
Cleophus McGee. 
Pamela McKeel 
Larry McNulty. N« rth Park 
William Miles. 5p« 
Frederick Moore. North Park 
James Mott. Bui 
Timothy Mulvey. 
Ricky Munoz. 

David Nealis 

Ike Owens Jr 

Roberto Patron 
Javier Pineda. 
William Powell. 

Anastacio Reyes. Nortl 
Gladys Rice. 77) 
Tony Richardson 
Robert Riley. 
Rafael Rivera. I 
Charles Roberts, - 

Collins Scott. 
James Slmonson, Un 
Jimmie Singleton. I I 
Barry Smith, Foresl Glen 
Russell Stevens, 

Mlroljub Stojkovlc. North Ink 

Bertha Thomas. 
Lee Thompson. ■ 
David Thorps, 

Ronnie Walker. 

Lonnle Walker. 

Thomas Washington. 69th Streel 

Javid Wasson. N rth Park 

Fredrick White 

Robert Williams Jr . At h«l 

John Williams North 

Gary Williams 

Robert Williams, N rth Park 

Carol Williams, 

Theasler Winston. 69th Streel 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 11 & 12 




Beverly 
takes 
ZAP lead, 
four 

terminals 

also 

winners 



Congratulations were in order for Kimball terminal where a first place ZAP cer- 
tificate Was also earned. Making the presentation is unit supervisor Dave 
Kowalski. Accepting on behalf of the terminal's maintenance personnel is day 
foreman Felix Velinske. 



Beverly garage maintenance per- 
sonnel continues to pile up an enviable 
safety record with each quarterly Zero 
Accident Program. 

The Southside facility topped all 
other bus garages in the third quarter 
with the lowest accident frequency 
rate of the 10 areas in competition. 



Since the second quarter of 1984 
Beverly has taken six first place ZAP 
awards, including two special lunch- 
eons for having the lowest accident 
frequency in a six month period. Sec- 
ond place honors went to North 
Avenue garage, the only other bus 
facility to place in the third quarter 



ZAP recongition. 

Rail maintenance locations taking 
first place Zero Accident Program 
honors were 54th, Kimball, 
Harlem and 61 /Racine terminals. 

Personnel at 54th Street terminal 
have also had six ZAP victories since 
the second quarter of 1984, including 




Beverly garage day 
foreman James 
O'Brien (left), ac- 
cepts a first place 
Zero Accident Pro- 
gram certificate for 
the southside facility 
from Terrance 
McGuigan, director, 
Bus Maintenance. 



Steve Jackson, 54th 
Street terminal foreman, 
displays the terminal's 
first place award for 
ZAP as he is flanked by 
unit supervisor Leonard 
Davenport (left), and 
assistant foreman Gary 
Kemp. 





Unit supervisor Vito Collyard stands proudly with his crew at 61st Street ter- 
minal upon accepting the ZAP certificate. Standing to Collyard's immediate 
left is assistant day foreman Robert Basden. 



two luncheons for a six month 
accident-free period. Safety Super- 
visor James Dudley said the longest 
and most consistent string of victories 
in rail maintenance belongs to person- 
nel at 61 /Racine terminal where 21 
first place plaques have gone since 
1971. First place honors were earned 
at 61 /Racine in the first and third 
quarters of 1985. 

Accolades continue for Kimball 
personnel as they take a first place 
ZAP award. Kimball personnel earn- 
ed a catered luncheon during the 
previous 1985 quarters for the ter- 
minal's low frequency accident rate. 
Meanwhile. Harlem terminal is 
receiving its first top ZAP certificate of 
the year. 



// was a proud mo- 
ment for terminal 
foreman Alvin 
Crawford f left J, as he 
accepted Harlem/ 
Lake 's first place 
ZAP certificate being 
presented here by rail 
maintenance terminal 
superintendent 
Richard Lorimer. 



*7*Sf 




PENSIONERS 



HILARIO J. ROSAS, Bus Operator, 

Archer, Emp, 8-26-68 
WILLIAM C. SCOTT, Superintendent, 

South Shops, Emp. 10-2-42 
LOUIS C. THOMAS, Bus Operator. 

69th Street, Emp. 12-2-65 



LeROY E. AVERY, Bus Servicer. 

69th Street. Emp. 3-22-67 
TARIEK T. GAHIJI. Conductor, 

61st Street, Emp. 5-18-73 
ROBERT H. GRAHAM, Bus Operator, 

77th Street. Emp. 10-10-74 
VINCENT G. JOBSON, Bus Operator, 

69th Street, Emp 10-14-68 
ROBERT F. KREJCA, Ticket Agent, 

North Section, Emp. 10-6-67 
SHEILA L. WATKINS, Bus Operator, 

Kedzie, Emp. 12-9-74 



JAMES M. BENNETT, Ticket Agent, 

63rd/Ashland, Emp. 11-13-67 
RICHARDINE G. FOSTER. Ticket Agent, 

Kimball, Emp. 11-5-60 
JOHN A. MELUS, Motorman, 

Howard, Emp. 9-2-66 



•ROBERT BOLDON, Bus Operator 
North Avenue, Emp. 10-26-67 

ALVA H. ROBBINS, Bus Operator, 
North Park, Emp. 10-26-67 

ROBERT E. WALKER, Bus Operator, 
Archer, Emp. 8-27-70 

•Retroactive to 11-1-85 



Pensioners 
may change 
withholding 

Pensioners should know that they 
have the right to change the amount of 
tax withheld from their pension 
checks. If you don't have enough tax 
withheld, you may be responsible for 
the payment of estimated tax and tax 
penalties. 

If you wish to start, stop or change 
the amount of federal income tax be- 
ing withheld from your check, simply 
contact the Pension Office and the 
proper forms will be supplied to you, 
or you may fill out IRS Form W-4P 
which is obtainable from the IRS, and 
send it to the Harris Bank Pension 
Withholding - 5W, P.O. Box 755, 
Chicago, IL 60690. 



Social Security 

benefits 

explained 



M 



any people think of Social Securi- 
ty as just a retirement program, but it is 
important to remember that Social 
Security can also pay disability benefits 
to insured workers and survivors 
benefits to their families. 

It is important to know what Social 
Security benefits are available as you 
plan your family's future financial 
security. 

As of January 1986, the average 
monthly Social Security benefit being 
paid to a widowed mother with two 
children is $1,107. In the event of a 
worker's death, Social Security 
benefits may be paid to any unmarried 
children under age 18, and children 
up to age 19 provided they are still in 
secondary school. 

Other beneficiaries may include 
disabled children over age 18 who 
were disabled before age 22, a widow 
or widower caring for a disabled child 
of any age who needs physical care. 

A widow or widower age 60 or 
older may also receive Social Security 
survivor benefits (reduced benefits at 
age 60, and full benefits at age 65). A 
disabled widow or widower who is bet- 
ween the ages of 50 and 60 years old 
may also receive benefits (reduced). 
All benefits are contingent upon the 
worker having acquired enough work 
credit under Social Security. 

If either the widow, widower, or 
children worked while receiving Social 
Security benefits, and earned in excess 
of the annual exempt amount for that 
particular year, their Social Security 
benefits would be reduced for that 
year by one dollar for each two dollars 
earned. 

According to the Department of 
Health and Human Services, Social 




Security benefits never run out. For 
example, the two surviving children, 
ages six and eight years old, of a 
32-year old man, would be able to 
receive survivor's benefits until they 
reach age 18, or 19 if they are still in 
secondary school. 

On the other hand, the man's 
30-year old widow could receive 
benefits until the youngest child is 16 
years old. The widow could again col- 
lect as early as age 60 for reduced 
widow's benefits, or at age 65 for full 
widow's benefits. If she were to 
become disabled, she could receive 
disabled widow's benefits as early as 
age 50. 

If one of the children became disabl- 
ed before age 22, the child could 
receive benefits until the disability end- 
ed, or for life should there be no 
recovery. 

Retirees between 65 and 70 years 
old may now earn up to $7,800 an- 
nually and still receive all of their 
Social Security benefits. Retirees 
under age 65 may earn up to $5,760 
and retain their benefits. Persons at 
least 70 years old retain all of their 
Social Security benefits regardless of 
other earnings. 

Social Security beneficiaries who 
work are required to file an annual 
report of earnings with the Social 
Security Administration by April 15 of 
each year following a year in which 
they have earnings. This report 
enables SSA to ensure correct 
payments were made during the 
previous year. 

The Social Security Administration 
advises beneficiaries who still have 
earned income to report any change in 
earnings immediately to avoid over- 
payment of Social Security benefits. 



10 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Free life insurance 

ends 

with 
retirement 




%_Jpon retirement your life insurance 
coverage paid for by CTA ends. It may 
be converted to an individual policy at 
your expense during the month before 
you retire . 

However, the retirement plan pro- 
vides similar coverage called a death 
benefit. If you are retired at your 
death, this benefit will be paid to your 



designated beneficiary. 

The payment amount will depend 
on your age and years of service at 
retirement. The maximum payment is 
currently $4,000. There is no policy 
issued for the death benefit; rather it is 
a part of the Retirement Plan docu- 
ment. Death Benefits are paid as 
follows: 





Age at 


Years of 






Retirement 


Service 


Death Benefit 


Any 


25 or more 


$4,000.00 




65 


20 or more 


4,000.00 




60 thru 64 


20 or more but 
less than 25 


3,000.00 




55 thru 59 


20 or more but 
less than 25 


2,500.00 




55 thru 65 


Less than 20 


1,000.00 




Under 55 


Less than 25 


1,000.00 


■■I^B^H 



Death Benefits are paid to the 
primary beneficiary as listed by the 
retired employee on the designation of 
beneficiary form. If more than one 
primary beneficiary is named, they will 
share equally. Further, secondary 
beneficiaries are paid only when no 
primary beneficiary is living. 

After you retire you must keep your 
choice of beneficiary up to date. You 
may change your beneficiary at any 
time by filing a new designation of 
beneficiary form with the Office of the 
Secretary of the Retirement Allowance 



Committee at 440 North Wells Street, 
Suite 600. Chicago, Illinois 60610. A 
notice to this effect was mailed to all 
retired employees with their 
September 1985 checks. 

Please note that you must name 
your beneficiary. Your spouse or 
children do not automatically become 
beneficiaries of the Death Benefit. 

Finally, the Office of the Secretary 
of the Retirement Allowance Commit- 
tee must be immediately notified of the 
death of any retired employee. To 
report a death, call (312) 670-0361. 



SERVICE 
ANNIVERSARIES 



40 Years 



George Christensen 
Signa I Radio 

John Friedman 
Escalatm Malntei 



35 Years 



Frank Brady, Employmenl Placement 

Melvin Link. Instruction 

Arthur Loman. Ashl,nid Terminal 

John Mitchell, Ashland Terminal 

Adele Monson, Forms. Records & Procedures 

William Suddeth, Racine Mtce 

Charles Gage, Utility 

Joan Georgeson, Law 

Homer Harris. Schedules 

Arthur Paige. Archer 

Ervin Schultz, North Park 

Joseph V. Tunzi, Operations/Administration 

30 Years 

Harold Bober, Forest Glen 

Sidney Edwards Jr., Utility 

Thomas McCue, Claims 

Elvin Carey. Bus Service 
James Moore, Utility 

25 Years 

Robert Adler, Jefferson Park 

Arthur Battle, North Avenue 

James Braun. Forest Glen 

George Dimitsas, Terminals-North 

Patrick Griffin. Elec Dist. 

Robert Julun Jr.. Bus Personnel -South 

Francis Leak. Forest Glen 

John Murphy. I lee. Dist 

Raul Navarrete. Archer 

Edward Poche. District B 

Carl Schmook II, General Mice. 

Paul Stahulak. Signal. Phone & Radio 

Edward Steed, Forest Glen 

William Uhl. Claims 

John Ware, South Shops 

Lynn Wilkerson, North Park 

Clarence Baker. 77th Street 

Ernest Feltz. Adm & Budget 

Richardine Foster, North Section 

John Gillespie. Field Review 

David Greig. Signal. Phone & Radio 

Alonzo Hooper, Mice Training 

John Koepke Jr., Signal. Phone & Radio 

Arthur Lupescu, Signal. Phone & Radio 

Padraig Lynch, Rail System 

Salvatore Marsico, Forest Glen 

Eleson Murphy. Schedules 

Levell Nichols, General Mice 

Jasper Pollizze. General Mtce 



1985 Vol. 38 — No. 11 & 12 



11 





uv 




LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION 



3 



\v* 




JL - 10 P.M. on Saturday, October; 
23. 1985 and a Ravenswood train 
pulls away from the Merchandise Mart 
station in the midst of a raging blizzard. 
You may have missed the October 
blizzard or torrential rains which fell 
upon a single city block. Such oddities 
are part of the magical world of movie- 
making. Gone are the days of filming 
exclusively on back lots in Los 
Angeles. Chicago has gone 
Hollywood! 

In recent months the City of 
Chicago and the CTA have benefited 
from a push by state and local film of- 
ficials to bring more production com- 
panies to Chicago. In 1984 Chicago 
earned $25 million by playing host to 
the film industry. Predictions for 1985 
indicate that the revenues will be even 
higher. 

Several of Chicago's major attrac- 
tions are the unique location shots 
provided by CTA's rapid transit 
elevated and subway trains, which 
allow scenic views of the city's magnifi- 
cent skyline and lakefront. CTA buses 
are often used not only for ambiance 
but also for transportation to site selec- 
tions as well as keeping extras warm 
during winter filming. 

Bob Ryan is the CTA's Public Af- 
fairs Special Projects Coordinator and 
serves as liaison to the film industry. 
Bob coordinates the scheduling for 
filming done on CTA property and 
assists in checking that the film com- 
panies have proper insurance 
coverages. CTA staff from various 
departments, including management 
and bus and rail operating personnel, 
play integral roles in the filming pro- 
cess. CTA personnel strive to 
cooperate with the production com- 
panies and familiarize them with the 



inauaM* r3i 




many services that the transit system 
has to offer. 

Featured here are a few of the many 
stars caught shining in the 
Windy City. 

LADY BLUE, the ABC series starr- 
ing Jamie Rose as Katie Moriarity. a 
member of the Chicago police force, is 
based in Chicago. 

The series MARY, portraying Mary 
Tyler Moore as a local newspaper col- 
umnist, also originates in Chicago. 

NOTHING IN COMMON, with 
Jackie Gleason and Tom Hanks, utiliz- 
ed CTA buses in September. 

SEXUAL PERVERSITY IN 
CHICAGO, based on the local play 
by the same title, features Rob Lowe 
and Jim Belushi. The movie's produc- 
tion crew created a snow storm at the 
Merchandise Mart in October. 



Photography by Bob Ryan 



> 






41 




Lady Blue: 

CTA Supervisor Sidney Edwards, 

coordinates train operations with Lady 
Blue director John Floria. 

It is hard to believe that Jamie Rose 
portrays Chicago's toughest crime 
fighter in Lady Blue. 

Mary: 

Mary Tyler Moore has the look of a 
stylish executive heading for a lunch 
date at the Merchandise Mart 

Nothing In Common: 
Jackie Gleason, who portrayed a 
bus operator in the famous Honey- 
mooners TV. show, returns to the 
transit world in Nothing In Common. 



5 
6 

7 
8 



Sexual Perversity In Chicago: 

Teen idol Rob Lowe is made up and 
ready to go aboard a would-be 
Ravenswood local. 

Chicago's own Jim Belushi, gets 
caught in the act at LaSalle and Van 
Buren. 

An artificial October blizzard falls on 
the Mart platform with help from the 
technicians on the roof. 

Cotton was planked between the 
tracks to create the look of fallen 
snow. 



NEWS 

INSIDE 

NEWS 



Pardon our tardiness, but we were 
simply overwhelmed with a backlog of 
Inside News. As we go to press with 
the final issue of Transit News for 1985 
however, we're wiping the slate clean 
of everything we've had on hold. 

As we launch a brand new start we 
hope you will continue to keep us sup- 
plied with all those interesting tidbits of 
information for TN readers in 1986. 
Rick Willis/Editor 



North Avenue 

Yes, better late than never... Our con- 
gratulations to three of our North 
Avenue operators who were among 
the CTA Bus Roadeo "Winning 
Circle" contestants. Willie Stewart, 
Salvador Flores, and David 
James. Now, if you've read the com- 
mendation column carefully, you pro- 
bably already have noticed these three 
gentlemen's names have appeared 
more than once so again, our con- 
gratulations... Seen voting in the union 
election at Forest Glen recently was 
former North Avenuer Adonis Ber- 
rios. Adonis now has a wife. 
Theresa, and remarked that they 
took advantage of an airline package 
deal, flew to Southern California and 
did all the tourist fun things while they 
enjoyed their month long honey- 
moon... Instructor Joe Valtierra who 
is at Limits training center, visited 
North Park recently and was 
overheard commenting that he and his 
wife, Rachael, will be reaching their 
21st year of marriage soon. With all of 
those stores near Limits, Joe, you 
won't have any excuse for not finding 
her a gift will you?. .Remember that 
near whale that was caught by a 
member of the Charles Strockis 
family we reported to you a while 
back? Well, seems that Charles finally, 
finally managed to produce this photo 




of his son, Brian, age 7 and the IOV2 
pound coho they caught. Maybe the 
rest of you can't see it, but is that one 
of those "flying fish" we see in the pic- 
ture above Brian's head?..Y-A-W-N. 
Talked to Jacques Yezeguielian at 
the union office at 5 A.M. where he 
was checking in as an election clerk, 
and learned a little more interesting in- 
fo on our co-worker. Jacques flies a 
twin engine Beechcraft plane and has 
been a pilot for over 20 years. In the 
many years he's been a pilot, he has 
flown around the globe three times 
and met Hawaiian singer entertainer 
Don Ho and former French President 
Georges Pompidou. H-m-m. 
wouldn't it be nice if some of us could 
get together next vacation, charter a 
plane and let Jacques do the 
"driving?".. Nice to see once again was 
Harvey Jones now a pool instruction 
superintendent. Mr. Jones was atten- 
ding one of the "ESPP" meetings at 
North Park recently and looks like his 
usual cheerful self... Wondering? Well, 
we saw operators and some of the 
"rail" personnel from Kimball and 
North Park locations when they were 
getting ready for that 26-mile Chicago 
Marathon held recently but did we 
overlook anyone here from North 
Avenue? C'mon now people, we can't 
let them get all the publicity can 
we?.. Don't we all look so natural hav- 
ing our picture taken? It's really nice to 
see someone we know and not have 
to guess their identity when it comes to 
being recognized by our bosses. 
Operator Robert Dickens received a 
Special Recognition Certificate, a look 



at the control center operations, along 
with his photo published describing his 
actions while working. Well done, 
Robert... Stepping up, up, up! Look 
who from North Avenue received their 
certificates of graduation as super- 
visors Lawrence Chatman, Joe 
Ellis, Carlos Davila and yes. 
Thelma Young. See what a little 
motivation will do for us, people? Best 
wishes, all. ..Just some of our 
operators who received commenda- 
tions lately: Tyrone Malloy, 
Abraham Morgan, Robert Patter- 
son, Veronica Rowell, Charles 
Tabb and Diego Santos-Rios 
...Hoping everyone attending has a 
good time and fond memories after we 
close with this year's North Avenue 
Annual Christmas Party. With a magi- 
cian doing his bit, two bands providing 
musical entertainment and $500.00 in 
prizes, it should be something to enjoy 
and talk about. Just in case you 
haven't notice, Gail Calloway is one 
of our hard working organizers of this 
event Clifford Vandervest, 




formerly of Forest Park, and a retired 
CTA rapid transit worker, sends best 
wishes to his Chicago area friends as 
he pauses in comfort on the patio of 
his Bemidji, Minnesota home. 

Mike Flores 



Archer Garage 

Congratulations to bus operator, 
Claude S. Brown, Jr., and his wife. 

Norma, of NCB Production. Once 
again, they have succeeded in produc- 
ing a fabulous fashion show with din- 
ner and entertainment. With the help 



U 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



of Norma's mannequins, who did a 
wonderful job modeling Norma's latest 
designs: the Munchkins, who modeled 
and performed; and the spectacular 
commentator, Willie Ray, the 
fashion show was a success. Entertain- 
ing was by Squeeze Band; vocalist 
Diana Wilson, and our own Board 
Member Local "241, Tom Collins, 
D.J. Photographers from Archer 
garage were operators Ray Hamb, 
Bobby Townsend, Isaiah William, 
and Otis Clay of 77th garage. Prin- 
ting for the show was done by Archer 
Supervisor, William Jones. Each 
year Claude and Norma Brown work 
hard to put this event together. They 
started this show in 1977 at the 
Roberts 500 room. Later they 
discovered that the 500 room was not 
large enough to accommodate their 
audience; so they moved to the Con- 
dessa Del Mar in 1978. A year later 
they had a packed audience again 
which led them to their present loca- 
tion, the Sabre Room in Hickory Hills, 
IL. The unique thing about these 
fashion shows is that Norma custom 




makes all the clothes in the show. The 
models include her husband, Claude 
and son, Kevin. Throughout the 
years Claude and Norma have had 
various supporters to contribute to 
their success. Some of them are: Blue 
Cross/Blue Shield, Illinois Bell, 
Chicago Board of Education, etc. But 
most of all , a lot of their support comes 
from the CTA operators. Next year, if 
all goes well, Claude and Norma will 
be celebrating their 10th anniversary. 
Seats go on sale starting June, 1986 
through October, 1986. So keep up 
the good work Mr. and Mrs. Claude S. 
Brown, Jr. and we'll see you next 
year... On December 20, 1985. Ar- 



cher's Christmas Committee held their 
annual Christmas party... Welcome 
back operator Lena Jackson. Vaca- 
tion one week in Alabama. And 
operator Willie Young. Vacation 
one week in Jackson, 

Mississippi. . .Congratulations to 
operator Steven Branch, who was 
married recently... We extend our con- 
dolences to the families of: Clerk Ruth 
Adkins, whose husband passed 
away; operator Percy Anderson, 
whose wife died; and operator 
Chester Robertson, whose father 
passed away. . .Please send news items 




to me before the first of the month for 
the Transit News. 

Ollie Hoskins 



North Avenue 

Well, hello, hello, and welcome to 
North avenue. Our newest operators 
joining us are: Jesus Santos, David 
Metken, Edgar Moya, William 
Garcia, Pablo Gonzalez, and Elias 
Valdovinos...Bet you didn't know 
our janitor, John McGarvey, is one 
of those well-traveled folks among us. 
John recently ventured to Sydney, 
Australia, while on vacation and en- 
joyed himself immensely. Though he 
says, "Everyone there drives on the 
wrong side of the road." John started 
at the Lawndale garage as an operator 
and mentions he has about 10 more 
years before retirement. Daniel 
Rios (North Avenue) is looking good 
and says he's feeling mucho better 
after losing all those extra pounds from 
the waistline... Former North Avenue 
operator Dorothy O'Neal is now 
working the extra board at Limits 
garage and looking like she's mighty 
happy. Or maybe it's because she's 
thinking of her last vacation in Las 
Vegas, Nevada, along with her current 



\NS\Dt 

NEWS 

vacation coming up that she's plan 
ning on spending in Nassau, 
Bahamas... Welcome to our new 
superintendent, John Baxter, 
formerly of North Park garage. By the 
way, we hear he's quite a chef in the 
barbequed ribs department!.. Nice to 
see former Fullerton operator 
Lawrence Chatman working as a 
supervisor on the street recently. Larry 
will be reaching his 20th-year anniver- 
sary with CTA in January, 1986. Be- 
ing married and the parent, of two 
teenaged boys gives him the oppor- 
tunity to find more uses for his home 
computer, as well as probably explain- 
ing to his sons how it works. Or is it the 
other way around?. Supervisor 
Rafael Perez, C District, and his wife. 
Lucy, attended their daughter 
Lourdes' graduation from DePaul 
University. Now that Lourdes has 
passed the examination for CPA (Cer- 
tified Public Accountant) and works 
downtown, just the thought of no 
more college tuition will keep Mr. 
Perez smiling as he works his post this 
winter at North Avenue and Damen. 
right Rafael?.. Former North Avenuer 
Bob Charney went on vacation to the 
Wisconsin Dells with his wife. Cathy, 
and said it was O.K. Bob is now work- 
ing at Forest Glen garage and says 
working on Irving Park is O.K., too. 
H-m-m, well, O.K. ..Seems like Forest 
Glen received some of our best 
operators as witness to James White 
who left North Avenue nearly five 
years ago and works the Central 
Avenue line now. James used to be 
on North Avenue's "Saints" basketball 
team and now says he's going to come 
back to get back on the team... Isaac 
Dean had the opportunity to make 
use of his line instructor abilities when 
he had his two students in training 
recently... Steve Nicpon used to 
work the night car on Fullerton for 
nearly twelve years until he got restless 
and went to Forest Glen where he's 
doing the same night work on Irving 
Park. Few of us were aware that Steve 
is a licensed general contractor and 
built his family an eight-room home. 
Steve and his wife JoAnn are the 
parents of a son, Mark, who will 
graduate in December, 1985 with a 
degree in Public Accounting from Nor- 
thern Illinois University. The Mr. and 
Mrs. also have a daughter, Kathy, 
who is a member of the U S . Air Force 
and is training to become a helicopter 



7985 Vol. 38— No. 11 & 12 



15 



INSIDE 

NEWS 

pilot. Kathy's not making any collect 
calls home to mom and dad from Kun- 
sun, Korea, where she's now station- 
ed, is she Steve?.. One of our super 
nice operators, Earl Hobson had to 
travel to Jackson, Mississippi for the 
funeral of his beloved mother Sally- 
Ear! wants to thank everyone for their 
thoughtfulness and kindness. 

Mike Flores 

Public Affairs 

Dan Kane, Supt., Customer 
Assistance visited the old sod and con- 
tinued to learn more about his family 
genealogy. He's already looking for- 
ward to his next European 
vacation.. .Ed Cummings was in 
town visiting his friends. Boy, he really 
looks great!. .Congratulations to 
newlyweds Jeff Branecki, procure- 
ment engineer, Materials Manage- 
ment, and Mary DeRose, confiden- 
tial office assistant, Chief Ad- 
ministrative Officer's office... Bob Mc- 
Carthy, supervisor, Procurement 
Operations, has a new addition! It's a 
puppy. Tanner is half Golden 
Retriever and half "Heinz 57." Tanner 
loves his new home and Bob is finding 
out that he likes to eat a lot... Allen 
Pfeiffer, sales representative. 
Treasury, vacationed in Europe this 
summer making stops in London, 
Scandinavia, and New York. Hope 
you had a great time in the land of the 
Midnight Sun... Helping Kay Cor- 
coran, executive secretary. Treasury, 
celebrate her birthday were two former 
CTA employees. Do you remember 
Lillian Skora? She is former 
secretary to retired Supt. of Real 
Estate George Seiler, who by the 
way, will be celebrating his 85th birth- 
day this year. Lill is the sister of 
Chester Skora, superintendent. 
Stores (deceased). Lill is married to 
Don Dattilo... Alice Dungan, con- 
fidential office assistant. Equipment 
Engineering and Maintenance, recent- 
ly returned from a European vacation. 
She had a great time and has a lot of 
interesting stories to tell you... Con- 
gratulations to Kathy Sloyan, 
Revenue Accounting, who got mar- 
ried while visiting in Ireland. "Mise Le 
Meas," Kathy!.. Goodbye wishes went 
to Maria Lopez, utility clerk. 
Treasury, who resigned and moved to 
Mexico. We miss her happy smile in 
the cashier's office. A luncheon was 



held at Martini's Restaurant in Maria's 
honor. Many of her co-workers as well 
as friends from Job Classification 
attended. 

Arlene Zittman 



General Office 

Avis Davis, the daughter of Bar- 
bara Neeland, Claims/Law Depart- 
ment, and her family are relocating to 
Muncie, Indiana. Her son-in-law, 
David, has joined the staff at Ball 
State University as Director of Minority 
Enrollment. Avis, an Illinois 
Registered Pharmacist, is preparing for 
the Indiana State Boards. Barbara's 




10-year old grandson. Brian, started 
his modeling career in 1982. He has 
modeled for Sears, Montgomery 
Wards, Marshall Fields and, in 1983 
with Bill Cosby for Texas In- 
struments. He has also been in Crest 
and McDonalds commercials. He's 
done voice-overs for radio and 
televison and is presently registered 
with The Screen Actor's Guild... Proud 
dad Joe Lazzara of Capital Develop- 
ment told this reporter his daughter. 
Lori Ann Lazzara, was named to the 
Deans List of the College of Engineer- 
ing at Marquette University, 
Milwaukee for outstanding academic 
achievement. Also due to her 
achievements, she was pledged to the 
AEMB and TAU BETA PI societies at 
Marquette. Accolades to Lori on a job 
well done! 



Operations Planning 

A farewell "Coffee And" was held 
for John Gaul, who left CTA for an 
opportunity with the New York Transit 
Authority. Goodbye and good luck to 
John and his wife on their new ven- 
ture. 

Public Affairs 

We're glad to see Jeff Stern back at 
his typewriter after a brief absence. 
Hope you're feeling better. 



North Park 

Congratulations to Supervisor Juan 
Gonzalez, D District, upon his 
graduating in the Superintendent's 
class of 1985. ..Proud father Mahlon 
C. Mims is so busy playing daddy that 
he's forgotten to give us the photo of 
newborn daughter, Maria, born 
September 19, weighing 6 pounds, 4 
ounces; oh yes, helping in this event is 
his wife, Linda, and her little helper is 
their other daughter. Jala, age 
5... Can you imagine the conversation 
between Eula Jarrett (Devon) and 
husband, Virgil, (Kedzie Garage 
operator) as they're driving down to 
Brownsville, Tennessee to pick up 
their son, Tramaine, who's spent the 
summer with his grandparents? 
"Watch that truck, use your turn 
signals." HA!.. Superintendent Kenny 
Czachowski mentioning how great it 
felt to be back behind the wheel of a 
bus, or in this case, one of those 15 
passenger vans. Sitting alongside our 
boss was his wife, Pat, their children, 
Kim and Brian, Mr. Czachowski's 
parents and his sister. Barbara. En- 
joying his vacation in Orlando, 
Florida, WE can only wonder if he 
watched that right side mirror when 
making those right turns? Honk! 
..Speaking of right turns. Frank Von 
Schwedler notes that his VFW 
(Veterans of Foreign Wars) post in 
Park Ridge, IL will be presenting their 
annual Merit Awards to a number of 
outstanding policemen and firemen in 
ceremonies soon. Frank has been a 
member of the VFW for 40 years while 
his son Frank Junior claims his 
membership at the 17-year mark. 
Frank says his post is the second largest 
in Illinois but didn't say which post is 
THE largest, your turn Frank... H-m- 
m, Hollywood Hopeful Department? 
Well. Marton Reeder is a Star, sort 



16 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



of. While scenes were being filmed 
here in Chicago recently for "the 
GREAT ONE Jackie Gleason's 

newest film. Marton's bus was used at 
the Morse and Ashland location while 
one of the regular actors portraying 
the CTA driver wore Mr. Reeders 
badge. Oh well. twinkle, 
twinkle... Oscar DeSoto, (Lincoln 
Avenue) has been a licensed pilot for 




nearly 15 years now and OWNS a 
Piper Cherokee Aircraft which he 
keeps at nearby Palwaukee Airport. 
Mr. DeSoto has given some of our 
operators a chance to go for a plane 
ride. It does make for interesting con- 
versation when you're w-a-y up there 
looking w-a-y down and you run into 
some of that air turbulence... Passing 
thoughts which may not be too soon. 
How about those of us here at North 
Park getting TOGETHER and organiz- 
ing a Spring 1986 picnic? Might be a 
nice way for those of us interested to 
have a nice day outside barbequing 
along with some softball. volleyball, 
and a chance to let the kids run wild. 
Who knows, you might even meet 
that person you've wanted to get a 
chance to talk to... Probably sitting at 
home and watching TV; operator 
Comelio Soto, Sheridan Road. 
Operator Soto recently broke his hand 
and painful as that may have been, 
we're sure his wife, Coky, will find 
some job around the house for him to 
do. Hope you're feeling better 
Amigo... Harry "Butch" Ott, now at 
Beverly garage, and wife, Cathy, are 
the proud parents of their newborn 
son, Mark Henry Ott, who weighed 
in at 8 pounds, 3 ounces, measured 
20V2 inches and to whom you may 
mail future birthday cards remember- 
ing he was born on September 20. 
1985... Another familiar face: Instruc- 
tor Efrain Malave now at Limits is 
coming to work here at North Park. 



Since one of Efrain's hobbies is using 
his portable video camera, maybe he 
can show us films of how he found 
parking space at Limits!. Enrique 
Carrillo is looking forward to spen- 
ding two weeks in his native country of 
Colombia. "Ricky" plans to attend his 
sister, Estella's, graduation 
ceremony when she receives her 
degree as a Doctor of Medicine from 
the National University of Colombia, 
and to see the rest of his family whom 
he hasn't seen in seven years. Enjoy 
your time with the family, Ricky, have 
a safe trip and bring back some pic- 
tures, O.K.? 

Mike Flores 

North Park 

Arturo Valdez will get his chance 
to play Santa Claus this year twice 
when his daughter. Martha, brings 
along his granddaughter, Claudia 
Alejandra, to visit for a month. After 
enjoying Chicago's winter season Ar- 
turo, wife Rosa, daughter and grand- 
daughter will then watch the miles 
pass as they drive to Monterey, Mex- 
ico to visit his mother, Pilita... Leav- 
ing North Park on our system pick are: 



INSIDE 

NEWS 

John Crespo (who always seems to 
have that upbeat attitude). John says 
he's going to Kedzie Garage, but we 
expect to see him back here next time 
around. ..Pat Cobb (who never 
seems to be in a hurry for anything). 
Patricia laughingly says she's going 
back home to 69th Street Garage 
...Not to forget but "Granny" 
Georgia Harris is also waving good- 
bye to all of us. We make mention of 
her new title Granny because recently 
her daughter, Robin, presented her a 
3 pound, 6 ounce newborn grand- 
daughter named Cot'e LeShawn Ed- 
wards. We're certain that Georgia will 
pick day runs at her new station 
"Limits" which should leave her plenty 
of time evenings to change 
pampers... Did Robert Moscovitz 
mention where he spent all of those 
vacation days recently? It must have 
been somewhere exclusive because, 
upon his return, we spotted him at the 
station looking very stylish wearing a 
suit... Speaking of stylish, can anyone, 
just anyone, remember ever seeing 
our chief clerk Jerry coming to work 
less than impeccable? Seems like he 
should have some sign of wrinkle in 




Fun 

in the 

Sun 

(city that is!) 



CTA retirees in Sun City, Arizona got 
together recently during a visit by 
Chicagoan Anthony M. DeMayo 
who retired from Forest Glen garage. 
The group includes (from left-back 
row) Henry Ziolkowski, Dan Gor- 
ski, and Tony DeMayo. Seated are 
(from left) Mrs. Jacque Tchelebian, 
Jean and Pete Norris, and Ted and 
Irene Wodarski. 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 11 & 12 



17 



INSIDE 

NEWS 




Pin 
Busters 



Displaying the plaques they earned for 
the 1984-85 bowling season are 
members of the "Pin Busters," the 
77th Street Operators Bowling 
League. The awards were presented 
at the team's banquet by garage 
superintendent David Hinman 



(center) at the T. J. Mulligan 
Restaurant. The honorees are (from 
left) C. V. Johnson, Wilson 
Washington, Luther Lee, team cap- 
tain; Superintendent Hinman, 
Howard McMillan, Rufus Meeks, 
and Bob Kendricks. 



clothing sooner or later, wouldn't you 
think?. .Nickname notes: Imelda 
Brown says her mother just started 
calling her Cookie. ..Joining the ranks 
of future operators who'll be retiring in 
the year of 2015 are Rocco 
Delaguila who in the past has work- 
ed as a runner for the mercantile ex- 
change and as a wine salesman. Con- 
sidering Chicago's winters that last 
position might help you make it thru 
till spring Rocco, HA!.. Alongside, we 
have Hugo Echeverria who has 
studied law enforcement in college 
and, probably a B-I-G plus, has driven 
the highways as an eighteen wheeler 
C.B. "talkin" driver for eight years. 
Hugo is married and mentions his 
wife, Carol, looks after their two 



boys, Rocky and Vincent while he 
starts his career with CTA...And let's 
not forget Hank Jakobi who's a 
graduate of Chicago Teachers Col- 
lege, former citywide baseball instruc- 
tor working with two other gentlemen 
in that position and, look at this, he's 
also played for our Chicago White Sox 
as pitcher during the mid 1960's! 
..Next time you see him smiling, it 
may have to do with thoughts of his 
daughter. Supervisor Allen Lichter, 
"D" District, will be one of those proud 
fathers when his daughter, Marci, 
graduates from Washington Universi- 
ty, St. Louis, Missouri, class of 1986. 
Marci will receive her Bachelor of 
Science degree and has thoughts of 
then attending Law school... Con- 



gratulations on their election efforts 
thus making them winners in our re- 
cent union elections. Our station clerk 
Dorothy Smith, captured the Elec- 
tion commissioner position while 
George Dalmas of 77th station won 
the first Vice President 
spot... Holly wood Hopeful Dept. Next 
time you are in the local book store 
and spot a familiar name and face on a 
book jacket, you may recognize it as 
belonging to operator Eric Kyles. 
Seems that Mr. Kyles has been 
devoting the past year to writing about 
his army days in Viet Nam and now is 
looking forward to having it published 
in mid-1986.. This November, 1985 
also marks the closing of 25 years ser- 
vice for supervisor Hubert Burketh. 



BARBARA ANTHON, 76, Treasury. 

Emp. 4-1-68, Died 10-3-85 
CHARLES F. BELASICH, 86, Const & Maint.. 

Emp. 11-25-18. Died 10-18-85 
DANIEL J. CALLAHAN, 72. Forest Glen. 

Emp. 9-19-47. Died 10-9-85 
JOSEPHINE COLEMAN, 56, Fac. Engr. & Maint 

Emp. 10-28-56. Died 10-2-85 
LESTER J. CUMMINGS, 88. Shops & Equip., 

Emp 4-7-44. Died 10-18-85 
ARTHUR C. HANSEN, 83. Shops & Equip.. 

Emp. 7-9-37. Died 10-16-85 
MATHEW P. HORAN, 73, Forest Glen. 

Emp. 2-9-37. Died 9-29-85 
EDWARD W. JASEK, 71, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 8-27-45, Died 10-30-85 



IN nVCE3nVCOR.I^.]VI 



JAMES H. JOHNSON. 64. 77th Street. 

Emp. 7-24-47, Died 10-10-85 
RAYMOND P. KULCZAK, 70, Forest Glen, 

Emp. 7-17-46, Died 10-6-85 
MILTON A. LaCHOCHE, 80. Stores. 

Emp 11-2-36. Died 10-5-85 
FRANCIS J. LITTAU, 78, North Park, 

Emp. 12-14-40. Died 9-1-85 
THOMAS J. McHUGH, 91, Shops & Equip 

Emp. 6-6-43. Died 10-25-85 
EDWIN J. McINTOSH. 88. Logan Square. 

Emp. 10-2-15. Died 10-13-85 
VALENTINE J. NESSINGER. 80, Law. 

Emp. 7-23-34, Died 10-21-85 



EDWARD W. ODAY, 70, Howard, 

Emp 1-30-52. Died 10-22-85 
ELSIE V. OLSON, 66. North Section. 

Emp. 3-29-67. Died 10-28-85 
TIMOTHY RIORDAN, 77. Shops & Equip . 

Emp. 9-13-27, Died 10-11-85 
JOHN C. ROBINSON, 78, 69th Street. 

Emp 10-22-53. Died 10-31-85 
EDWARD J. ROWLAND, 85. Shops & Equip 

Emp 10-29-20. Died 10-6-85 
EDWARD H. SCOTT. 65, Fac Maint . 

Emp. 1-24-57, Died 10-31-85 
HAROLD C. STROM, 72. Engineering. 

Emp. 3-6-72, Died 10-4-85 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



18 



Most of the operators only know Mr. 
Burketh by his last name, but even if 
you didn't you could always spot him 
wearing those trademark "red socks" 
of his. Hubert and his wife. Lucille, 
will be retiring to Cleveland, Ohio in 
case you want to keep in 
touch... Supervisor Christine Jones, 
"D" District may not have to haul 
those large Christmas gifts in the 
crowds this season after all. Her son, 
Semaj, plays the flute quite well, we 
hear, and has been since starting at the 
age of 10. Young Semaj has played 
for the Chicago Flute Society, so 
maybe mom will be able to fit his gift 
this year in her purse... Do you get it? 
One of our operators was overheard 
asking Gerri Cox where he had gone 
on vacation recently. Upon which 
Gerri replied with a straight face; "Oh, 
I went and spent some time at 
Plywood, Minnesota." F-u-n-n-y. 
Gerri... We'll bet few of you realize 
how much work was involved in plan- 
ning and finalizing all of the details for 
North Park's yearly Christmas Party. 
Those people on the committee were 
working for YOU. 

Mike Flore s 



Materials Management 

Another soon to be retired 
employee from Materials Management 
is Russell Lipari, file clerk. Records 
Center. An Open House was held for 
Russ and needless to say we all en- 
joyed the homemade refreshments 
furnished by his coworkers... A retire- 
ment luncheon at the M & M Club was 
held for Jean O'Neill, executive 
secretary. Many of her fellow 
coworkers attended this fine affair. We 
especially thank Linda Lundberg for 
her never ending talent of handling the 
arrangements for this luncheon and 
the many others she has arranged 
throughout the years... Coffee and 
cake was had for Marie Albano, 
Claim Department, who retired after 
31 years of service... Congratulations 
to all of our new retirees ...Zalika 
Williams, daughter of Sharon 
Williams, Micrographics, enjoys her 
monthly visits to the Express-Ways 
Children's Museum located on the 4th 
floor at The Chicago Public Library 
Cultural Center. Her favorite exhibit, 
of course, is wheeling the "38 CTA 
bus by obeying the traffic signal light 




mounted in front of the display. Other 
exhibits include a medical office, a 
grocery store, a postal office, orchestra 
instruments, building construction 
blocks, a telescope, the history of 
Chicago, and much more. The cost is 
free Richard Pytlewicz, Safety 
Department, along with his wife, spent 
their vacation in sunny California 
visiting Rich's sister. Joanne and her 
family. Joanne worked in Steno- 
graphic Services years ago . . .Seen at a 
Fraternal dinner were CTA retirees: 



INSIDE 

NEWS 

Don and Vivian Riess, Bill and 
Dorothy Unwin, the Russ Gunder- 
sons, and the Ken Mikotas. All of 

them send their regards to their CTA 
friends. We missed another CTA 
retiree at this affair and that was Bill 
Ashley and his wife. Lydia. (Maybe 
next year). ..Get well wishes to retired 
Director of Employee Relations. Bill 
Piatt, who recently underwent heart 
surgery. Bob McCarthy, Super 
visor, Procurement Operations, 
Materials Management, and his wife, 
Betty, spent Thanksgiving in Ontario. 
California, visiting their daughter. 
Mary Beth, and her husband. Mike. 
The main reason for this trip, 
however, was to see their newest 
grandchild. Brian Edward Norman, 
who is one month old. Bob and Betty 
now have two grandchildren to spoil. 
Their son. Robert, Jr. and daughter- 
in-law. Sue, have a daughter named 
Kelly. Grandma and Grandpa are so 




Golden 
anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Pelikan 

observed their 50th wedding anniver- 
sary June 29 with a party at Chicago's 
Golden Flame. The couple's children, 
grandchildren, and great- 
grandchildren were on hand for the 
special observance. Pelikan who was a 
bus operator at North Avenue, joined 
the ranks of CTA retirees on February 
1 . 1984 after 43 years of service. 



7985 Vol. 38 — No. 11 & 12 



19 



INSIDE 

NEWS 

proud of their clan . . . AI Pfeiffer, sales 
dept. flew (by plane) to Houston, 
Texas, to have Thanksgiving dinner 
with his niece and her family. 

Arlene Zittman 

Materials Management 

Best wishes for a Happy Retirement 
to Executive Secretary Jean O'Neill. 

Jean, now you'll have the time to do 
all those things you've been putting 
off... In an article I read in Crain's 
Chicago Business, author Howard 
Shanks, said, "A person retiring needs 
to take a fresh, in-depth look at 
himself. He needs to re-examine his 
values and his priorities. He needs to 
re-define the word "Important." He 



told me he moved his family to Seat- 
tle, Washington. Fred said all of his 
family has adjusted well to the new 
surroundings and clean environment 
...John Schwartz, retired Special 
Projects Coordinator, Management 
Services, recently returned from a tour 
of the New England States. John said 
the autumn colors were magnifi- 
cent... Visiting the Mart recently was 
Jerry McManamon. Jerry looks 
great and is busy working as a 
telephone operator at North Avenue 
garage... Angela Pacella, daughter 
of Carmen Pacella, Equipment 
Engineering and Maintenance, South 
Shops, won an academic scholarship 
to Lake Forest College from the Sons 
of Italy. Congratulations, Angela 



Finance department. They enjoyed 
their drive very much, especially 
visiting the Grand Hotel on Mackinac 
Island... Ruth Beutler, Library, and 
Adele Monson, Forms Design, vaca- 
tioned in Disneyworld, taking their 
children and grandchildren with them. 
It was 5-year-old Nikki's first flight 
and upon takeoff, Nikki said to Adele, 
"When are we going to blast 
off?"... Congratulations are in order-- 
Jim Saviano, Administrative Ser- 
vices, became the proud uncle of twin 
girls-Deanna and Dominique. 
Jim's sister-in-law and brother were 
only expecting one Corrine 
Camasta, COA, Methods and Stan- 
dards, Rail Maintenance, Skokie, 
recently returned to work after 




Ulysses Jones (right), 77th Street 
garage, makes his final relief on Run 
343, 28-Stony Island route, before en- 
ding a CTA career of 38 years and 
eight months. Jones, whose service 



began aboard street cars on Stony 
Island, said to end on the same route 
that gave him his career start is a hap- 
py coincidence. Accepting the relief is 
Operator Phillip Stokes. 
"So long, it's been good to know ya" 



waves Ulysses Jones as he and his 

wife Helen enjoy his retirement party 
which was held at the American 
Legion Hall on Chicago's south side. 
The couple plans to continue residing 
in their south suburban Robbins home. 



needs to consider very seriously this 
best piece of advice: Retire from your 
job--but don't retire from work. "...Our 
condolences to the family of executive 
secretary Martha Hallock, Stores 
section, whose mother passed 
away... As the year draws to an end, 
Materials Management department 
has many people celebrating 
birthdays. You know who you are and 
we wish you all a very happy birthday 
and a happy and healthy new 
year... Fred King, retired Deputy Ex- 
ecutive Director, Human Resources, 
stopped by this reporter's office. He 



...Our sympathy is extended to the 
families of Deputy Executive Director, 
Finance, Dan Perk on the loss of his 
mother, Millie Perkovich. Bill 
Buetow, Manager, Treasury, in the 
loss of his father, William C. 
Buetow, Sr., and to the family of 
Thomas Hall, warehouse worker, 
Washington garage, whose mother 
passed away recently. They thank all 
of you for your kind expressions of 
sympathy... Vacationing around Lake 
Michigan together were Edna 
Southworth, Materials Management, 
and her good friend. Rita Deakin, 



surgery. Glad to have you back, we all 
missed you. While Corrine was home 
recuperating, she became an auntie 
for the first time. Corrine's brother. 
Joe, and his wife, Lydia, welcomed a 
new little boy. Congratulations to 
all... The annual CTA golf outing was 
attended by several members of the 
Materials Management department. It 
was a beautiful Saturday in 
September. A good time was had by 
all... Fran Calpin and her mother just 
moved into their new condo. No more 
snow to shovel or grass to cut! 

Arlene Zittman 



20 



CTA TRANSIT NEWS 



Appreciation plaque 



INSIDE 

NEWS 





Triton Community College expressed 
appreciation to CTA Materials 
Management for the recent donation 
of six Detroit Diesel engines now being 
used by Triton automotive repair 
students. The plaque was presented 



by Dr. David Kozlowski (left), 
associate vice president. Economic 
Development. Accepting on behalf of 
CTA is Edward W. Tobin, manager. 
Materials Management/Purchasing 



Agent. Others present for th< 

were Mrs. Dorothy Harmon. CTA 

salvage control clerk who pres 

the engines to the college, and 

William C. Roman, director of 

Stores. 



69th Street Garage 

Dear Fellow Co-workers. Let me 
start off by saying OLD news is better 
than NO news, and a reminder to get 
in touch with any information you care 
to share. I took a small break in a few 
series of Transit News due to illness, 
but I'm back now... Super